Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1.    #1  
    I just noticed that Mozilla/Firefox has an add-on that syncs your bookmarks, passwords, history, tabs etc. to different PCs and also to mobile phones.

    Has anyone tried this? Does it work with the PRE? Are you concerned about security/privacy?

    Thanks!
  2. #2  
    If you are talking about X-marks, it isn't supported for webOS yet.
  3. #3  
    I think he's talking about Firefox Sync, formerly known as Weave: https://addons.mozilla.org/de/firefox/addon/10868/

    It's like Xmarks, but specific to firefox (no Opera etc support) and with fewer features.

    The big advantage is, that you can set up a sync-server yourself and don't have to put your data (passwords!) on some vendor servers. I care a lot about security and this is a big plus for me (hosting my own SSL sync server).

    So i'd like to see Firefox Sync on the Pre, too, but i doubt that we'll get it as it is really specific to firefox.
  4. #4  
    There's no Firefox on the Pre, so there's no Firefox sync.
    Pet Peave: When people use photographs of themselves as Avatars. There's something unsettling about their big faces staring back at me in the forums. . . . Maybe I'm just paranoid.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by canderoc View Post
    There's no Firefox on the Pre, so there's no Firefox sync.
    There's no Firefox on the iPhone. but there's a Firefox Sync app for iOS.

    That's because it's just a syncing client.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by WalterH View Post
    The big advantage is, that you can set up a sync-server yourself and don't have to put your data (passwords!) on some vendor servers. I care a lot about security and this is a big plus for me (hosting my own SSL sync server).
    Just curious, if you care so much about security, why are you letting ANY browser store your passwords? Really just curious because I don't let any browser store any passwords (I do have a handful of forums that I allow to keep me logged in via cookies, but these are low security worry forums for me).
  7. #7  
    nappy's right. Someone still has to code it though. The firefox programmers won't do that, it has to be a Pre community member - and that's why i doubt that we'll get a Pre version soon.

    Here are specs, API and storage format: https://wiki.mozilla.org/Services/Sync/Specs/

    Here's the firefox plugin source and build instructions: https://wiki.mozilla.org/Labs/Weave/Building

    So if any C++ programmer feels bored and wants to spread some happiness around...

    Unfortunately (or fortunately??) i never learned C++ and wrote my last C programs about 12 years ago... *cough* *cough*
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by OldSkoolVWLover View Post
    Just curious, if you care so much about security, why are you letting ANY browser store your passwords?
    OT, but since you ask:

    It's a security risk, i'll grant you that. I'd rather not, but for practical reasons i store passwords in firefox: I'm the type of person that doesn't trust the password handling in _any_ website and therefore i use different passwords for every site i visit to minimize potential abuse. You can't remember all the passwords of course, so you have to store them _somewhere_. The most convenient place is the browser. An encrypted password store would be better (i use "keepass" for this, e.g. for ssh passwords), but all the constant copy and paste for website logins is a pain.

    But i think i minimized the risk:

    The sensitive partitions of ALL my computers are encrypted. Full harddisk encryption with LUKS on Linux at home and on my servers, Truecrypt and native /home encryption on the Mac at work. I don't use Windows at all.

    The firefox sync server is in my basement (encrypted) and i only access it via SSL.

    I use firefox as my main browser and disabled all dynamic content and most cookies via NoScript and restrictive preferences. The whitelist is very short, mostly sites with dynamic content that i need regularily and that are comparatively trustworthy. But normally, if i can't see a page in firefox, it can't be that important and i just skip it. Oh, and i blacklisted lots of domains with AdBlock Plus of course.

    If a site with dynamic content really IS important ( ) i view it with konqueror or safari and i don't store passwords in these browsers. If a site looks cheesy to me i use alternative browsers, too.

    Call me paranoid - i assure you that i can live with it. Quite a few people call me just that.
    Last edited by WalterH; 09/09/2010 at 06:04 PM.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by WalterH View Post
    OT, but since you ask:

    It's a security risk, i'll grant you that. I'd rather not, but for practical reasons i store passwords in firefox: I'm the type of person that doesn't trust the password handling in _any_ website and therefore i use different passwords for every site i visit to minimize potential abuse. You can't remember all the passwords of course, so you have to store them _somewhere_. The most convenient place is the browser. An encrypted password store would be better (i use "keepass" for this, e.g. for ssh passwords), but all the constant copy and paste for website logins is a pain.

    But i think i minimized the risk:

    The sensitive partitions of ALL my computers are encrypted. Full harddisk encryption with LUKS on Linux at home and on my servers, Truecrypt and native /home encryption on the Mac at work. I don't use Windows at all.

    The firefox sync server is in my basement (encrypted) and i only access it via SSL.

    I use firefox as my main browser and disabled all dynamic content and most cookies via NoScript and restrictive preferences. The whitelist is very short, mostly sites with dynamic content that i need regularily and that are comparatively trustworthy. But normally, if i can't see a page in firefox, it can't be that important and i just skip it. Oh, and i blacklisted lots of domains with AdBlock Plus of course.

    If a site with dynamic content really IS important ( ) i view it with konqueror or safari and i don't store passwords in these browsers. If a site looks cheesy to me i use alternative browsers, too.

    Call me paranoid - i assure you that i can live with it. Quite a few people call me just that.
    Good info!

    You see the lifehacker article on easy to remember passwords (but still making em different for every site)? Not as secure as what you are doing, since it still contains some form of base password and a certain algorithm. Funny thing to me was it is an article that won't get to the people that should read it, and the people that do read it should already know...
  10.    #10  
    I googled "Lifehacker article passwords" and got an article on the "Lastpass" program which was highly recommended.

    I normally get worried enough about security to go this far, but it is free.

    Is this the article you mentioned? Does anyone know much about "Lastpass"?
  11. #11  
    FWIW, you can use your own server for Xmarks. Look on the "Advanced" tab in the settings dialog box.
  12. #12  
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by chodaboy View Post
    FWIW, you can use your own server for Xmarks. Look on the "Advanced" tab in the settings dialog box.
    Been a while since i tested Xmarks. The version i tested didn't have that feature. Thanks for the info. I stand corrected. Maybe i have to give it another try.
  14. #14  
    FYI on Xmarks - The company appears to be closing.

    Xmarks Blog End of the Road for Xmarks
  15. #15  
    Well it does work on prefox...it did twice..as prefox is still far from a main use browser theres no point using it just for this, but it worked pretty well
  16. #16  
    So saddened on the loss of Xmarks. Frankly, the alternatives are limited to one specific browser only and thus worthless to everyone who has to use different browsers. Firefox and Chrome need to step it up and offer a way to access your bookmarks and open tabs from across mulitple platforms and browsers.

Posting Permissions