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  1.    #1  
    I did this while bored - thought some might be interested. The first image is, of course, the default pre background. The red square shows the approximate area enlarged in the next photo. The next photos are 8x magnifications and 35x magnifications. Note the distinct red, blue and green on the 35x that go to make every color on every single image you see. Stick them close enough together and to your eye they blend into lots of other colors.
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  2.    #2  
    Just for clarification, this was done by placing the pre on a digital dissecting microscope with 8-35x variable magnification. No external lighting was used. The individual colored dots that make up images are easily seen and, I think, very cool. These images are reduced from much larger ones.
  3. #3  
    Wow, this is really cool. You must have been REALLY bored, but I'm glad you were... I'm pretty sure you have the first-ever microscope photography of a Pre. Can you also photograph oreo? LOL. Well done!!!
  4. #4  
    Ok... that was cool! I felt like I was a fly with a compound eye looking at that flower.
    Very cool post
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by intron View Post
    I did this while bored - thought some might be interested. The first image is, of course, the default pre background. The red square shows the approximate area enlarged in the next photo. The next photos are 8x magnifications and 35x magnifications. Note the distinct red, blue and green on the 35x that go to make every color on every single image you see. Stick them close enough together and to your eye they blend into lots of other colors.
    intron, you just didn't go far enough. If you focus your microscope in on one of those squares and go to 350x, here is what you see.

    You see that it is a fractal, continually repeating itself. ;-)
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  6.    #6  
    glad you guys like it. I have to say, since I have never magnified a screen of anything before I didn't know what to expect. So when I saw sets of 3 little itty bitty lights that are simply turned to various shades and brightnesses of rgb, I thought it was pretty spiffy. I wonder if I can squeeze my pc's lcd screen under there
  7.    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey47 View Post
    intron, you just didn't go far enough. If you focus your microscope in on one of those squares and go to 350x, here is what you see.

    You see that it is a fractal, continually repeating itself. ;-)
    ahhh...see, goes to show that you learn something everyday.
  8. #8  
    This is fascinating. What's interesting is how the pixels have space between them on the left and the right, but not the top and the bottom (as oriented in these pictures). I wonder why.
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  9. #9  
    Wow... that's really cool. I'd never thought to look that closely. haha
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  10.    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by mu7efcer View Post
    This is fascinating. What's interesting is how the pixels have space between them on the left and the right, but not the top and the bottom (as oriented in these pictures). I wonder why.
    Good question and I have no idea.

    I probably should have re-oriented the pics to portrait orientation but I took the pics with the pre in landscape orientation so I was lazy and it was easier to just rotate the default wallpaper

    It is crazy to me that basically 3 different colored lights can make all the different things we see. I mean, I know that is how things work (RGB monitors are called that for a reason), and I know that you can choose html colors using RGB specifications, but seeing it this close is really a rather different thing.
  11. #11  
    cool!
  12. #12  
    Very Cool!
    "Patience, use the force, think." Obi-Wan


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  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by mu7efcer View Post
    This is fascinating. What's interesting is how the pixels have space between them on the left and the right, but not the top and the bottom (as oriented in these pictures). I wonder why.
    I was curious about this myself, the answer is that each pixel is a 3x3 (with three diodes of the three colors). The images above just happened to only have 2 of the 3 diodes on.

    I took some photos of my pre with all the diodes on.

    edit: Only one row is really bright because I keep my pre's brightness at about 30%
    Last edited by runtimmyc; 06/03/2010 at 02:29 PM.
  14. #14  
    Very interesting images.
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  15. #15  
    Actually, they aren't diodes, they are liquid crystals. There are 3 color filters which allow light only through the crystals they are assigned to. The color and intensity of each color, are tweaked by the amount of light the crystal allows through from each color. The crystals twist under the piezoelectric effect. So the black spaces are the areas where the color filters are opaque and the electrical lines are run through there. Each pixel will be made up of a group of red, blue, and green sub-pixels (the individual squares - crystals - that you see).

    My company makes avionics, some of which include LCD color displays, and we have to test for stuff like pixels stuck on, or half-stuck, so many sub-pixels stuck off, etc...
  16.    #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by falconrap View Post
    Actually, they aren't diodes, they are liquid crystals. There are 3 color filters which allow light only through the crystals they are assigned to. The color and intensity of each color, are tweaked by the amount of light the crystal allows through from each color. The crystals twist under the piezoelectric effect. So the black spaces are the areas where the color filters are opaque and the electrical lines are run through there. Each pixel will be made up of a group of red, blue, and green sub-pixels (the individual squares - crystals - that you see).

    My company makes avionics, some of which include LCD color displays, and we have to test for stuff like pixels stuck on, or half-stuck, so many sub-pixels stuck off, etc...
    Cool... that makes sense. Thanks a lot for the clarification.
  17. #17  
    No problem.

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