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  1. #21  
    Let me say that based on the 'perception' test the ultimate scaler app has signif drained my battery. I was running the 800 ipk with the paid ultimate cpu scaler version set to the max. I just disabled the app, uninstalled the 800 then reinstalled the 800. Will see how it is perceived....
  2. #22  
    Well if you are looking for an overclocked Kernel, I would look to WebOS internals Uberkernel. It is a scalable kernel up to 800MHz. The MAJOR difference between it and SuperKernel is that it IS AUTOUPDATE SAFE. Which means you don't have to remove it when you get a new WebOS update.

    Now a couple of observations on scalers. WebOS internals is developing a one stop shop app called Govnah, that in time will handle all kernel management functions. Right now it monitors processor temp, current frequency and displays current governor (scaling) settings. It has a drop down to select a different one, but I haven't tried that yet. I have been using the paid version of CPU Scaler Ultimate.

    I have noticed that with any scaling enabled my pre runs significantly hotter and despite having significant time in the lower frequencies when idle, my battery time life has been less. When I switched back to steady 800 MHz it immediately ran cooler especially when charging on my TS and my battery lasted longer.

    So for now, I won't be scaling.

    NOTE.... Uberkernal runs at a default 500 MHz, so you will need some type of kernel management app to change the frequency.

    EDIT... I am now running the new version of Super Pre Kernel and am loving it. It seems quite solid, very fast and super easy to install and uninstall prior to an OTA update.
    Last edited by pastorrich1; 04/27/2010 at 10:39 PM. Reason: new info
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by mu7efcer View Post
    CPU usage is a lot more complicated than just what frequency it's running at. Consider this: LessWatts.org - Saving Power on Intel systems with Linux

    In the case of the Pre, it may very well be that taking the device out of idle into 250MHz and then scaling up to 800MHz is more power hungry than taking it out of idle directly into 800MHz.

    I don't know the answer to this riddle. But I would love other people to try to replicate or repudiate the results. Anyone can install Battery Monitor and repeat the experiment. I'd love for others to do so and share their findings.

    So, according to the link, a device can, locked at 800Mhz, improve battery performance by getting the job done and then going to idle. Why is there NO mention of this "idle" mode in any previous discussions of the Pre? Only that being locked at 500Mhz with no scaling to reduce power where possible, and no capability to peak at 600Mhz, lead to the device being both sluggish at times, and low on battery life.

    Is the here-to-fore un-discussed concept of "idle mode" the key element? Does it really exist? Does a device processor, essentially go to rest when not currently working on something? If so, what do we need scaling for? There really is no reason for the processor to slide up and down the frequency scale, "as needed". Just do the jobs in little bursts of speed and then go to sleep.

    Assuming this concept is correct to a point, is the flaw, that any extended processes, i.e., long phone calls, listening to music or watching video, or gaming that MIGHT not require a full 800Mhz worth of power, going to eat battery life because the user is dictating the length of processing time? In this case, do we then get back to the idea that CPU scaling is, in fact, the better solution?

    That said, I have read folks having luck with a variety of combinations, with the 500-800Mhz range being a good one. Why isn't 125-800Mhz the best? Why does it seem to lead to more spontaneous device turn-offs (shut downs would imply some process of actually shutting down) and overheats? Just this morning, I was playing with CPU scaling. If you use the scaling app to turn off scaling while in the category of the lower speeds, it sets the device base at 500Mhz, with a max of 600Mhz and a min of 125Mhz. If you go into Uber Speeds, and turn off scaling, it sets the speed at 500 with a max of 800 and a min of 125. At these levels, with scaling turned off, it seems to work well, stay cool, and preserve battery. BUT, when I actually choose the 125-800Mhz range (which, again, seems to be the base at Uber speeds with scaling turned off), the device heats up immediately. Mine jumped 7 degrees in just a few minutes.

    What would be really good is a primer. Basic ranges that work well for different things. Like, doing basic calling, text, email etc, one level. Video and gaming another, BT headset while on the car charger, another etc. Just a range of general usage that affects battery life, speed, and device temperature, and how to manage those issuers.

    Too much?
    "If you can't view and manage multiple apps, via multiple open windows, side-by-side, it's not multi-tasking, PERIOD." - Me
  4. #24  
    Interesting posts pelikan3 & pastorrich1, I've been having random lock outs with cpu scaling enabled. It however only seems to happen in low signal areas and charging. I'm going to try the no cpu scaling tomorrow to see if things improve.

    Hopefully at some point we'll have a definitive guide of what cpu scaling, overclocking will do to your battery and what works best.

    Also I've never had a problem with my battery getting too hot. Instead it only seems to be the screen half of the phone that gets very warm. This is particularly the case when the phone randomly locks up.
    Last edited by novakry; 04/25/2010 at 03:53 PM.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by pelikan3 View Post
    What would be really good is a primer. Basic ranges that work well for different things. Like, doing basic calling, text, email etc, one level. Video and gaming another, BT headset while on the car charger, another etc. Just a range of general usage that affects battery life, speed, and device temperature, and how to manage those issuers.

    Too much?
    I agree with this. And that's why I ran an experiment and posted my results. If there's a way that we're going to learn the best cpu settings for a given use case apart from experimentation, I don't know it.
    Twitter: dullgeek
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    #26  
    So, if you have Govnah, you don't need CPUScalingUltimate? Should I install CPUScalingUltimate?
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by delao13 View Post
    So, if you have Govnah, you don't need CPUScalingUltimate? Should I install CPUScalingUltimate?
    Govnah allows you to set the specs of the governor that's in use much more fine grained than does CPUScalingUltimate. CPUScalingUltimate takes the experience of the authors as for what's best and uses those settings. Govnah lets you set everything yourself.

    OTOH, Govnah does not currently have any mechanism to persist those settings across a reboot, where CPUScalingUltimate can. If you want your settings to persist across a reboot w/Govnah, you have to login to the Linux command line and add a file to /etc/event.d that contains the settings you want.
    Twitter: dullgeek
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