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  1.    #1  
    I live in cali and I noticed that Best buy and radio shack don't have working/live pres. Actually all phones are dummy phones. However there's always a working iphone at Best buy. I wonder if this contributes to a lack of sales. I know going into the store what I'm getting. But the regular folk or Palm commercials for Mom how can they make an informed decision off of a dumby phone.
  2. #2  
    I logged in just to say that my entire REGION'S dummy phone for Sprint is the Pre. Hell, my district has sold 50 of them in the past week. It just depends on the area.
  3.    #3  
    It seems like a weird strategy. I doubt people would by a computer if it was a dummy model. Same thing with HDTVs. Heck that goes for the majority of appliances sold in store.
  4. #4  
    Well, on average, we stock 36-50 different cellphones over three carriers. To have a working model of each phone, we'd need 50 demo lines* per store. It's not cost-effective. Corporate picks one a quarter. Q1 was the Pre.

    *provided that you have one line per SKU. AT&T/T-Mobile phones could just switch the SIMs out, but one would still need one demo line per Sprint phone, so you're looking around 15 demos, which is still crazy.
  5. IanMcB's Avatar
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    #5  
    When my wife bought her Pre we went to a Sprint store to play around with it (and give her the chance to look at other phones) then went and bought it at RS.
  6. #6  
    i've never seen a working phone at radio shack. i've only see two working phones at any best buy, an iphone at every best buy and coincidently, a Palm Pre at launch day in Southern California. There, however is not a live one there now.

    interestingly at pre launch day there was both an AT&T rep and some guy working their walking around with a working pre. Personally i'd only buy the phone after playing with it. So i don't get the strategy.

    I also think Apple was smarter then the other phone makers and when they contracted to sell the iphone at Best Buy they wrote into the contract that display models have to be actual phones. I also think their contract says they have have seperate location from other phones but i'm not sure. just a guess cause i've noticed iphones are often not lumped in with the other phones.

    me i went to a sprint store and used the phone. Then bought later online.
  7. Rockser2g's Avatar
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    #7  
    I just went to radio shack and the portly sales woman that the samsung moment was a far better phone than the palm pre. When I asked her why she asked me if I was familiar with the android market. She said that all android apps are free and that the pre only had palm apps. I was not very happy. She also told me that therey are phasing the pre and pixi out, and there isn't any available in the district. Which sucked cause I wanted to get my girlfrien one for free.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rockser2g View Post
    I just went to radio shack and the portly sales woman that the samsung moment was a far better phone than the palm pre. When I asked her why she asked me if I was familiar with the android market. She said that all android apps are free and that the pre only had palm apps. I was not very happy. She also told me that therey are phasing the pre and pixi out, and there isn't any available in the district. Which sucked cause I wanted to get my girlfrien one for free.
    Samsung Moment ??? Oh God gimme a break! As far as I know that phone does not even have a capacitative touchsreen. It's resistive, meaning you have to press hard to get things done. And that woman at radioshack should be fired for not knowing anything and misleading customers. Android DOES have paid apps... Proof ? Android Market

    Not to mention I read nothing but complaints on Samsung Moment on Sprint's Facebook.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rockser2g View Post
    I just went to radio shack and the portly sales woman that the samsung moment was a far better phone than the palm pre. When I asked her why she asked me if I was familiar with the android market. She said that all android apps are free and that the pre only had palm apps. I was not very happy. She also told me that therey are phasing the pre and pixi out, and there isn't any available in the district. Which sucked cause I wanted to get my girlfrien one for free.
    Anyone on Precentral work @ the Shack? If so, can you explain why the hell every Shack I go to try to sell me a "moment". Do you get spiffs for selling this phone? Or any other phone that's not a Pre.
    I live in Hawaii and the 3 Shacks I went to all recommended the same phone.
    Sales pitch...
    1)android apps are way better...BS!
    2)we sell more moments' then Pre...wonder why
    3)android OS is better...BS imo.
    *** Radio Shack?
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by rigatoni1374 View Post
    Anyone on Precentral work @ the Shack? If so, can you explain why the hell every Shack I go to try to sell me a "moment". Do you get spiffs for selling this phone? Or any other phone that's not a Pre.
    I live in Hawaii and the 3 Shacks I went to all recommended the same phone.
    Sales pitch...
    1)android apps are way better...BS!
    2)we sell more moments' then Pre...wonder why
    3)android OS is better...BS imo.
    *** Radio Shack?
    We get spiffs for selling ANY phone. The associate is just biased.
  11. #11  
    I manage a RS and yes the associate helping you was biased. I own a pre and highly recommend it but has only started to sell really well because it is free. Too late because the shack isn't carrying it anymore.
  12. #12  
    I don't personally like the idea of dummy display products, but I can understand why they're used. Those fake pieces are either free, or provided at a small cost to the retailer. If some shoplifter decides to steal it without verifying it's a real product, the store loses $5 or so, and has to order another. They can be played with (they're weighted to simulate the real heft of the product), buttons can be tested for feel, scratched, dented, whatever. Nobody cares much. Real, working small electronics cost the store more, can't be sold in most cases, and are kindof a pain when they do get stolen, which happens more than you think. You know what your phone looks like after a year of use, imagine what that poor thing would look like after just a few months of wear and tear as a display model. They need to be replaced every now and again, that starts to add up when you have 30+ models of phones on display, if not more. Circuit City used to do dummy products, and yeah, it sucked when I wanted to check out the new Palm PDA, and I couldn't actually use the OS to see how it responded with the new hardware. I dunno. I guess Best Buy is more concerned about losing ten sales that day than losing one display unit once in awhile, which is how I look at it.
  13. pawdog's Avatar
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    #13  
    I don't think the general public knows enough about any smart phone to get anything out of playing with the phone in the store for a few minutes. These things are more complicated, (capable) than just about any consumer mass use electronic thing on the market right now. And what other thing has more makes and models? To my thinking automobiles come to mind. But you can get a car salesman to spend an hour with you just to get you to take his business card. Try that in a cell phone store.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by pawdog View Post
    I don't think the general public knows enough about any smart phone to get anything out of playing with the phone in the store for a few minutes.
    i very much disagree with that. I think most consumers prefer to test out stuff before they buy. I don't remotely think it's too complicated. It's just a phone. They've seen them before. And a cell phone is hardly more complicated then the average laptop which these people probably have.

    Regardless, take Best Buy, their tvs are on, cameras, gps, all the computers, video game systems, music instruments are all usable and plugged in. I think they consider actually using a product in a store a good way to sell product in most circumstances.

    obviously not all as we discussed with cell phones but also washing machines and microwaves. I guess they assume it's either not feasible, economical or needed in some cases.

    And i think the biggest example of the success of this idea is Apple. Apple's recent products are all about the feel you get from actually using the phone. They want you to touch it and feel it. Jobs is always talking all breathlessly about "just look at it. Just touch it. It's so easy." And notice every apple store has most apple brand electronic products set out on usable displays. And unlike most stores Apple stores have expensive bose headsets where as even most other places that sell ipods and such dont' even have headphones attached. Their computers are loaded with software in the stores. It seems quite clear that their strategy is to get consumers to actually use their products. And i think it's a large part of their success. And by all means they are a massively successful company. like them or not they sell devices. They now what appeals to consumers and replicate that over and over.

    I don't see how you can sell a user interface as the primary selling point of a product but not give a potential consumer the chance to use that interface. Or at least make it hard for them to. i said the same thing to a a store employee about android and he totally agreed but was like, "Dude i get 9 bucks and hour, they don't listen to me."
  15. pawdog's Avatar
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    #15  
    I'm not saying that it's not a good idea for stores to provide a tactile shopping experience. I'm saying that people don't know what they are touching and whether it is as good as another product or worse. I'm talking first time smart phone buyers. The feature set of smart phones are far more comprehensive (instead of complicated) than that of anything people are buying right now.

    Maybe the people you run across are much smarter shoppers than the the ones I run across. These efforts would largely be wasted on them.

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