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  1.    #1  
    Is it really easy to port an iphone app to webos? Or is it just for the games? My thoughts...if it is easy to port over ANY iphone app, contact the the iphone app developers (especially for some of the smaller apps that maybe lost in the iphone app catalog) that you would like to see with webos and suggest they port it over to webos. It maybe worth their time if it's simple enough, and they maybe more successful with webos (like selfaware games). Just a thought...

    Another way to help webos succeed is by supporting the official paid apps...this entices developers to come to webos, while helping palm as well. Of course, you as the consumer get the benefit of using that app that you were thinking about buying anyway! As always, it is up to you whether you think you'll find that app useful and I am not in anyway recommending you buy apps that are completely useless to you...
  2. KarlD89's Avatar
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    #2  
    i have contacted multiple developers about porting their games, and most do not believe it is possible to develop for webOS in coding similar to the iphone, as they do not know about the pdk,

    others say they will look into it, but do not promise anything (once i have told them about the pdk)

    and others say no because they are afraid apple will remove their apps from the app store, because the app is no longer exclusive to the apple app store
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by KarlD89 View Post
    i have contacted multiple developers about porting their games, and most do not believe it is possible to develop for webOS in coding similar to the iphone, as they do not know about the pdk,

    others say they will look into it, but do not promise anything (once i have told them about the pdk)

    and others say no because they are afraid apple will remove their apps from the app store, because the app is no longer exclusive to the apple app store
    that's unfortunate...have others had the same experience?
  4. #4  
    As difficult as it is to get into Apple's App Store in the first place, especially for small-time developers, I doubt anybody would risk losing a larger customer base just to port to another OS with a much smaller opportunity. I'd be giving it a long, hard think before even mentioning doing an app port away from Apple.

    Larger companies, sure. As long as they can see a potential profit, they'd probably do it.
  5. spare's Avatar
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    #5  
    others say no because they are afraid apple will remove their apps from the app store, because the app is no longer exclusive to the apple app store
    surely that is against anti-trust laws? Very anti-competitive action
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by spare View Post
    surely that is against anti-trust laws? Very anti-competitive action
    Nope. Apple isn't preventing you from selling your app anywhere you like, they're just telling you that they're not going to carry your app if you do choose to release it elsewhere as well. Quite typical for retail. Plenty of businesses can't carry a product simply because another store within a set radius is selling the same thing.
  7. spare's Avatar
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    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by fussnfeathers View Post
    Nope. Apple isn't preventing you from selling your app anywhere you like, they're just telling you that they're not going to carry your app if you do choose to release it elsewhere as well. Quite typical for retail. Plenty of businesses can't carry a product simply because another store within a set radius is selling the same thing.
    example? I'm trying to think of a walmart one but people usually don't hear about how they work with the little guy.
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by spare View Post
    example? I'm trying to think of a walmart one but people usually don't hear about how they work with the little guy.
    My experience? I work in, and have owned (one) music stores. It's not so bad out here, since the state is so sparsely populated, but back in Milwaukee, I couldn't carry Fender or Gibson, two of the biggest names in the industry. Why? Uncle Bob's had them. Fender is all for sales, and they do encourage competition to an extent, but if they gave me the same product line as three other stores within 20 miles or so of each other, everybody loses. We'd all be in ****ing matches lowering prices to get the sales, and in all likelyhood would wind up unable to restock, we'd have cut our margins too low. No good for Fender, obviously. Part of that, too, is most manufacturers limit HOW you sell. Taylor guitars, for example, or Peavey, I had to choose. Sell in store, or sell through mail order (or web sales, now). I couldn't do both. That's somewhat based on contract, though. Now, you can sell Fender on both fronts, but not within the same product range. I can, for example, sell Squier and Fender Mexican Strats online, but I can't sell American series, Custom Shops, Vintage reissues, or Relic series guitars that way. Those are in-store only. Wal Mart is actually the same, if you bother to look. I can buy Starter cheapie sneakers both in-store and off the website, but not the same models. If I want a particular shoe, I have to get it where it's available.

    Cars are the same as well. Notice that you never see one Ford dealership within a certain distance of another. They won't allow it.

    About the only small retailer example I can think of in my experience that's different is Mesa Boogie. They'll allow multiple dealers within an area........the dealers don't set the price. Boogie does. Pro pricing setup, it doesn't matter what store you go to, anywhere in the country, the price is going to be the same everywhere. What makes the sale there is your knowledge and skill with their product.
    Last edited by fussnfeathers; 03/25/2010 at 10:20 PM.
  9. spare's Avatar
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    #9  
    thanks. I guess lowes and home depot pull the same thing. They'll just end up selling similar things by different manufacturers (which would be developers in the software world)
  10.    #10  
    well, theoretically the developers of free iphone apps could port over without the fear of much to lose at least...
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by fussnfeathers View Post
    Nope. Apple isn't preventing you from selling your app anywhere you like, they're just telling you that they're not going to carry your app if you do choose to release it elsewhere as well. Quite typical for retail. Plenty of businesses can't carry a product simply because another store within a set radius is selling the same thing.
    The problem I'm seeing with this explanation, and the examples below it, is that it's the manufacturer (i.e. developer) telling the store that it can't sell their product because they decide this is good business practice. In this case, with Apple, it's the store telling the manufacturer. Kinda backwards, but just my take on things.
  12.    #12  
    it still doesn't hurt to contact the developer and ask...the more requests we get from pre users, the more likely the developer will consider it...
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by braindeadracefan View Post
    The problem I'm seeing with this explanation, and the examples below it, is that it's the manufacturer (i.e. developer) telling the store that it can't sell their product because they decide this is good business practice. In this case, with Apple, it's the store telling the manufacturer. Kinda backwards, but just my take on things.
    No, I think the real problem with this whole scenario is Apple isn't preventing developers from writing applications for other platforms.

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