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  1.    #1  
    while in usb mode, I ran a defrag on Windows 7. It said 20% defrag so I let it continue. Now that its at zero my Pre runs with more snap. Its good. Might help you guys, too.
  2. #2  
    This is called the placebo effect. Your Pre uses solid state memory, so it wont have the data seek issues a spinning disk such as your hard drive would have. The idea behind defrag is to move scattered related data to a single place on the disk so the magnetic arm doesnt have to seek all around the disk to read related data.

    Wish it were true, but defrag should not have helped your solid state drive even in the least bit.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by jamesrdorn View Post
    This is called the placebo effect. Your Pre uses solid state memory, so it wont have the data seek issues a spinning disk such as your hard drive would have. The idea behind defrag is to move scattered related data to a single place on the disk so the magnetic arm doesnt have to seek all around the disk to read related data.

    Wish it were true, but defrag should not have helped your solid state drive even in the least bit.
    good first post
  4. #4  
    man i love how theres always more snap to this thing, lol
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    #5  
    Actually, I've never tried it but MyDefrag has special scripts to handle flash drives.

    Of course, if we were using real filesystems fragmentation wouldn't be a problem. ;P
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by angiest View Post
    Of course, if we were using real filesystems fragmentation wouldn't be a problem. ;P
    That also brings up an interesting point, the ext file system should be self-defragging, however apps are stored on a FAT file system for USB access. Does the linux kernel automatically defrag this file system?
  7.    #7  
    could be. I feel it helped though. *shrug*
  8. #8  
    From what I understand, a person wouldn't want to defrag a memory card anyways. I believe each spot has a limited lifetime, so the logic purposely scatters data so no one spot wears out faster then the rest. That's what I've heard anyways.
  9. #9  
    I will have to see...
  10. #10  
    Taken from BlackBerry Forums: Tip - Defrag your Memory Cards

    Defrag still helps flash:

    Flash memory is optimized to read sequentially faster, and also flash access of small files (and small fragments) are somewhat inefficient. Although seek speed is the same from one non-contiguous block to the next (and seek doesn't increase the further apart blocks are, like for hard disks), it's still faster to read contiguous flash blocks. Defragmentation makes all these files sequential reads, making things faster.

    Another performance factor... if the filesystem block size (cluster size) is smaller than the flash block size (the amount of reading that the controller has to do), there could be additional advantage to defragmentation, when the memory card controller is forced to read a larger flash block in order to access a single small cluster. So this leads to unecessary extra reads. Cluster size should be properly optimized for the particular flash card.

    Don't defrag a flash card often, though. Repeated writes can wear down flash eventually. Wear-levelling algorithms will spread the wear-and-tear throughout the entire card (so even if one block can be written to only 1,000 times, you can still write far more than 1,000 times as a result of wear-levelling to other blocks). You can still wear out the card, but an occasional once-every-few-months defrag isn't going to hurt flash much -- just make sure you make a backup...

    Another technique is just simply copy all files off the memory card, reformat, and copy all files back. BAM -- all files are defragmented in a single write pass (avoiding the potential danger of repeated writes that defrag can do -- and if you use defrag directly on a card, make sure you enable write caching; that helps reduce wear and tear of repeated writes.)
    would the last option be viable on the pre?can the usb partition be "formatted"?
  11. #11  
    The Pre is only 8g. Not like a 256G SSD for a computer. With the speed that a flash drive reads, can a human really see any difference with a gain of a few ms?
  12. #12  
    I believe the difference between ext2 and ext3 was the journalism feature. Most linux distros have some sort of built in defragging utility. they work continuously, making sure files are put back in the right place to reduce the amount of defragmentation to begin with. Also, flash memory DOES HAVE A LIMITED NUMBER OF WRITE CYCLES. I do alot of data transfer via flashdrives, and they die all the time. I also had a netbook with solid state memory(soldered to the motherboard), and I killed that to. both journalism and defragging cause more write cycles, but it will not drastically reduce the lifespan of your palm pre. Assuming that since this is a smartphone, and not a flashdrive that costs 3 cents to make, it would make sense to include high quality memory units in the pre. Why use solid state at all? It has much faster seeking, reading, and writing times, and they are solid state(moving parts are easier to break). That is why photo and video editors use them as scratch disks(for doing the current work, not holding any important, long term data), and why phone and netbook manufacturers use them(durability). Size is usually another factor, as SSD chips can be much much smaller than even the smallest hard drives.

    A nice real world example is the palm lifedrive. They took a step away from ssd memory with a 4GB HDD. it was slow and it stuttered, and it was a behemoth

    Also, I don't think defragmenting will do much of anything. If the pre does in fact run an ext2 or ext3 filesystem, and windows and mac computers can access it without drivers, it means that the software on the phone(USB Mode) is doing some translating. Windows 7 may have thought it was defragmenting, but i don't think it reached the phone itself.
    Last edited by eovnu87435ds; 01/01/2010 at 12:12 AM.
  13. #13  
    pardon my ignorance , but ... ext2 erm etx3?!?!?

    No speaka Englese
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by sketch42 View Post
    pardon my ignorance , but ... ext2 erm etx3?!?!?

    No speaka Englese
    they are the filesystems used mostly with linux-based operating systems. Just as Windows uses NTFS and most portable drives use some variation of FAT (FAT16, FAT32, etc.), while macs use HFS and HFS+

    Most operating systems can natively see their own filesystem, and FAT filesystems, but normally will not even recognize other operating systems, and sometimes may even tell you the disk is damaged!
    Last edited by eovnu87435ds; 01/01/2010 at 01:13 AM.
  15. #15  
    ok so its like trying to defrag a windows harddrive on a mac.

    so what about "formating" your pre. (full erase) and dumping everything back would that be likely to make a "snappier" Pre?
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by sketch42 View Post
    ok so its like trying to defrag a windows harddrive on a mac.

    so what about "formating" your pre. (full erase) and dumping everything back would that be likely to make a "snappier" Pre?
    I don't think you can "format" the entire pre, as that would include deleting all the software that runs the pre. Reloading everything back onto your pre with webOS doctor would certainly get rid of the defragmentation, but you won't see any noticeable speed boost
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by eovnu87435ds View Post
    Most operating systems can natively see their own filesystem, and FAT filesystems, but normally will not even recognize other operating systems, and sometimes may even tell you the disk is damaged!
    Sorry I am a nut about things like this. Most Operating Systems out there read each others filesystem without a problem, Microsoft Windows fails to read anything non-Microsoft. Though I hate this, it's a smart move by Microsoft so they do not have to support it.
  18. #18  
    thanksss dude
  19. #19  
    ohho hojhh how u dom that

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