Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 64
  1.    #1  
    Okay, after reading yesterday's article on the front page, i thought (there i go thinking again ) that this would be great for a thread:
    Do you think it's more important to just get as many apps out to us as possible, so it looks like there's some kind of movement?
    Or should the emphasis be on quality?
    If you think the emphasis should be on quality, who do you think should determine what quality actually is, and where should the line be drawn?
    Last edited by Cantaffordit; 01/11/2011 at 12:56 PM. Reason: adjusted title to assist search engine
  2. #2  
    Quality of course and I should be the quality Czar.

    My first act as quality Czar would be to increase the quality of the location description under your avatar. I propose deleting everything but Atlanta.

    My second act as quality Czar would be to lobby Palm for a better API/SDK so that quality apps could be produced.
  3. #3  
    I think the emphasis should be on the marketplace. Palm should accept programs that technically run correct, don't break laws, and let the market place decide.

    I'm still unsure how I feel abut the $50 per app "friction" plan. Sounds like it might help the situation, but generally speaking, I'm against disincentives.

    I'm hoping that Palm can further develop the App Catalog itself in some way that would help filter through the nonsense. I'm almost positive I saw a patch yesterday that allows a person to "ignore" a company's entries in the App Catalog. If Palm incorporated something like that, possibly that would help discurage AppSpam.
  4. mrkalel's Avatar
    Posts
    739 Posts
    Global Posts
    821 Global Posts
    #4  
    Listen... I believe as Palm users.. we pretty much would all agree that Quality trumps quantity...but most of the press have trained the majority of people that Quantity means more...
    It doesn't matter if out of 100k apps... only 1000 are good...all everyone hears is "100k"...
    Android is following with their 20k (16k) claim...
    So Palm needs to do the same sadly...

    I dont care if I have to wade through a ton of crap to get to the good stuff... As long as having "x" amount of apps will help Palm's image out there...
    Follow me on Twitter : MrKal_El
  5. #5  
    I think it's better to be able to say "we've got a bunch of apps" instead of worrying about quality apps or nonsense, or whatever. In any platform, you'll have your opinion of what is junk and what isn't. Let the market sort it out.

    This isn't a market anymore where you simply buy well thought out apps to be productive or entertained by and keep them on your device longterm. There's some of that, but it's more of a throwaway app market where the fun for target buyers is trying out apps, quickly getting bored, then moving on to the next one.

    We really don't need Palm deciding what is junk.
  6. Mpre's Avatar
    Posts
    143 Posts
    Global Posts
    153 Global Posts
    #6  
    For me...I don't care about quality or quantity. I think those two will balance eachother out.

    But all I want is all the apps to be PRICED right.
  7. scooter26's Avatar
    Posts
    13 Posts
    Global Posts
    14 Global Posts
    #7  
    I think it's easy to get caught up in the "must have a ton of apps" movement when you see the advertising surrounding the iPhone and how successful that product is. I don't think though that you need to have a large amount of apps to be as successful. I mean - why not instead of trying to ride the wave of building up a huge app store, make the new standard an app store that has only mind bogglingly quality applications listed in it!? To me that would be just as marketable.

    Further, I would argue that if the handset maker had a comprehensive set of apps built in, there wouldn't even be a need for ANY app store. People may complain that there is no "fart" app, but if you are in a store deciding on a phone purchase, would you choose the one that will fart or the one that already has the things you will consistently need to help day to day already on the phone (again the key here is a comprehensive set of quality built in apps).

    The problem is these devices seem rushed out with missing features and so why not have an API and let the public do some of the rest of the work. This creates the next problem: the level of quality in the resulting apps is not held to the same standard that the manufacture would likely hold their product to.
  8. #8  
    I think the emphasis should be on apps that use all of the hardware of the device, and use it well.

    Of all of the categories that the rest of the market is running away with, appwise, I think voice-controlled apps are where Palm stands the best chance of catching up the quickest.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by scooter26 View Post
    I think it's easy to get caught up in the "must have a ton of apps" movement when you see the advertising surrounding the iPhone and how successful that product is. I don't think though that you need to have a large amount of apps to be as successful. I mean - why not instead of trying to ride the wave of building up a huge app store, make the new standard an app store that has only mind bogglingly quality applications listed in it!?
    Because without a bunch of money to throw at major developers (which Palm does not have), the only way of attracting them is by showing a large volume of apps and people buying them, i.e. a viable marketplace for their wares.

    Of course, Palm would have to sort out the complete mess that the App Catalog is in other regions FIRST, but once they get over that hump, volume will need to be a priority, hence....Ares.

    Further, I would argue that if the handset maker had a comprehensive set of apps built in, there wouldn't even be a need for ANY app store. People may complain that there is no "fart" app, but if you are in a store deciding on a phone purchase, would you choose the one that will fart or the one that already has the things you will consistently need to help day to day already on the phone (again the key here is a comprehensive set of quality built in apps).
    The problem is WebOS is a new platform, so where it was easy for Palm to offer a top-notch set of apps preloaded on, say, the Centro, they are starting from jump with the Pre. Additionally, they don't have the development resources to put a comprehensive set of apps on the device as it ships. I mean, have you seen Music Player or the Photos app?
  10. scooter26's Avatar
    Posts
    13 Posts
    Global Posts
    14 Global Posts
    #10  
    I agree with what you're saying, and I guess I would have preferred if they (Palm) would have spent every bit of energy on making additional and higher quality built in apps instead of doing any work on a public API. As a developer, I like being able to create apps for webOS to use on my Pre, but as a consumer, I would much rather have a device that was a lot more complete out of the box than what I got.

    Fundamentally I think webOS lays the infrastructure to win significant market share and it's just frustrating to me to see how opportunities are missed given suboptimal execution of various things (marketing could be better, built in apps could be better, etc).
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by mrkalel View Post
    It doesn't matter if out of 100k apps... only 1000 are good...all everyone hears is "100k"...
    That's what Apple and company are busy touting. Of course of those 100,000 apps there are less than 20,000 discrete apps in their catalog. All it goes to show is that throwing around a huge number will fool the masses.
  12. #12  
    Now that we have over 800 apps, I think it's time to forget about quantity and start concentrating on apps that people are requesting. People want a good word processor, book reader, audible book player, etc. The bookreader that is available, "Shortcovers," doesn't automatically bookmark and it doesn't scroll; pReader is well on it's way and allows readers access their eReader format books. pReader has already become my book reader of choice, but we still need a way to download books straight to our Pre and read MobiPocket formatted books. We need good bible software like Laridian's "MyBible."

    In essence, we need to get back the functionality that we had with our previous Palm Smartphones. The Pre got rid of the chunkiness, lets you multitask, and is a lot faster. Unfortunately, having all of that w/o the ability to do the things that you've grown accustomed to doing with your phone, is still a step back.

    I love my Pre and the ease of the format. I acknowledge that I do many things with the Pre that I never did with my old Treo even though the Treo was capable of doing it.

    I just need Palm to give enough access for audible and voice command. Thanks to the Homebrew community I have a great device. Thus, I also need Palm to stop with all the updates unless they're providing a huge amount of user-based requested functionality. In other words, the next update should fix the app limit problem, provide landscape e-mail, time-stamp text messages, etc.

    If the next update fixes the app limit problem and enables users to download their audio and digital books directly to their device, it will be worth it.
  13. mrkalel's Avatar
    Posts
    739 Posts
    Global Posts
    821 Global Posts
    #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by DeathsArrow View Post
    That's what Apple and company are busy touting. Of course of those 100,000 apps there are less than 20,000 discrete apps in their catalog. All it goes to show is that throwing around a huge number will fool the masses.
    Totally agree... I cant blame the lay person too much that only know whats good by what Apple tells them....

    What is disappointing is that the tech press also falls into the same thing... perpetuation the whole number of apps game....
    Follow me on Twitter : MrKal_El
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by DeathsArrow View Post
    That's what Apple and company are busy touting. Of course of those 100,000 apps there are less than 20,000 discrete apps in their catalog. All it goes to show is that throwing around a huge number will fool the masses.
    Just out of curiosity, where are you getting this 20K number from?
  15.    #15  
    Well, here's what I think (I know, i know- *crickets chirping* -very funny, ha ha):

    What's being done now, with the Ares emulator project, should've been done a year ago. This would have gotten the devs familiar with the new OS, given them a chance to program for it with the ease of 'emulation' and have a large (or at least a decent) selection available at launch.
    I'm sure Palm missed a lot of sales all summer because of the dry app catalog. That's where and when I think the quantity was important.
    At this point in time, is where the quality could have started rolling in.
    Why couldn't they do the emulator six months before launch to give the devs a head start?
    How could they try to grow a tree without planting the seeds and watering them beforehand?
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by dbd View Post
    Well, here's what I think (I know, i know- *crickets chirping* -very funny, ha ha):

    What's being done now, with the Ares emulator project, should've been done a year ago. This would have gotten the devs familiar with the new OS, given them a chance to program for it with the ease of 'emulation' and have a large (or at least a decent) selection available at launch.
    I'm sure Palm missed a lot of sales all summer because of the dry app catalog. That's where and when I think the quantity was important.
    At this point in time, is where the quality could have started rolling in.
    Why couldn't they do the emulator six months before launch to give the devs a head start?
    How could they try to grow a tree without planting the seeds and watering them beforehand?
    I think Palm switched gears to late to have done things in the timetable you're suggesting, and still have had the device out in June.

    They did release the emulator about 2 months before the Pre was released.

    Just to be sure we're on the same page, you understand Ares isn't an emulator, it's just a GUI development tool, right?
  17. #17  
    It doesn't really matter to me either way, because apps aren't an absolute need for me, but I'm guessing quality would be better than quantity.

    I browse the apps from time to see, and I see the most pointless apps ever- like the mirror changing one, with a face that pops out, and a BOTTLE SPINNING. That's just a waste of time.
  18. #18  
    Why can't we want both quantity and quality? LOL!

    I actually don't use that many and I haven't paid for any at all. The ones I have I love to use (Mileage Monitor is my favorite --- I got rid of a spiral ring notebook) but to me they aren't what makes the phone....
  19. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by UntidyGuy View Post
    If you think that most users out there want the same apps as you do then you are mistaken. For example, medical users have been among the most loyal of Palm users because they need to look up stuff in a pocket device and Palm OS was the first really successful platform. Palm isn't going to be developing or pre-installing the apps that medical users want. Nor for pilots, soccer moms, students, etc. That's why it's all about the apps.
    But why do we need another platform for apps when there's already the iPhone?
    Palm Vx > Treo 650 > Centro > G1 > Pre > BlackBerry 9700
  20.    #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    I think Palm switched gears to late to have done things in the timetable you're suggesting, and still have had the device out in June.

    They did release the emulator about 2 months before the Pre was released.

    Just to be sure we're on the same page, you understand Ares isn't an emulator, it's just a GUI development tool, right?
    To tell you the truth, I thought it was an emulator (I should've read closer). But regardless, you know what i'm trying to say though. The GUI development tool is a whole calendar year too late, imo.
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions