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  1.    #1  
    So I realized as soon as I made my first call with my pre that the earpiece has a photo-transistor to turn off the screen when the phone is put to your ear. I immediately came up with an idea for a patch that should help the poor battery life a little bit. A simple patch could be written stating to turn the screen brightness down to a certain percent when the light sensor is on, and bring it up to a certain percent when it is off. I know a little c++ and some programming with arduino. So it all seems simple enough, but I've never written anything for linux. So if any of you experienced linux programmers are hanging around looking for something new, give it a try. I'm sure I speak for others when I say we'd love to have that. Shoot me a PM too, I'd love to get a little tutorial on how to develop these patch's. Thanks!
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by dapallox1 View Post
    So I realized as soon as I made my first call with my pre that the earpiece has a photo-transistor to turn off the screen when the phone is put to your ear. I immediately came up with an idea for a patch that should help the poor battery life a little bit. A simple patch could be written stating to turn the screen brightness down to a certain percent when the light sensor is on, and bring it up to a certain percent when it is off. I know a little c++ and some programming with arduino. So it all seems simple enough, but I've never written anything for linux. So if any of you experienced linux programmers are hanging around looking for something new, give it a try. I'm sure I speak for others when I say we'd love to have that. Shoot me a PM too, I'd love to get a little tutorial on how to develop these patch's. Thanks!
    It's actually the proximity sensor, not the light sensor that turns the screen off during a call when you put it to your ear. That said, the light sensor does autodim the screen in low-light situations, albeit from my experience, usually not too much. As far as I can tell the majority of the light sensor and proximity sensor stuff is handled by the LunaSysMgr binary, unfortunately.
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  3. #3  
    As Jason said access to the Proximity and light sensors has to be made through a binary which make patching near impossible.

    Additionally C++ isn't going to help you very much in linux as it is designed to compile down to MSIL which stands for Microsoft Intermediate Language. You'll have much better luck programming in Cobal, Java, or possible Python.

    But that's really not how most patches are made, most just are linux commands and a replacement file which will change some of the javascript-buildin-apps. There are a few exceptions which require a daemon to be installed or some other process but none really would be considered patches as they are usually just adding additional features.

    However as far as saving battery life, a major brightness overhaul won't add an amazing overhaul to battery-life, but will probably be one of the minor adjustments seen in future updates.
  4.    #4  
    You know, as soon as I read that first reply, I remembered that I had discovered that it was proximity and not a light sensor. Yeah, I do agree that it wouldn't be major and at all, but it would be nice to have control over it a little. Yeah, I do know a little about linux to know that c++ isn't going to help much when it actually comes to writing somethng, but it does give you a nice understanding of pseudo. Thanks for the quick reply though.

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