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  1. #41  
    Quote Originally Posted by hatchettjack View Post
    steal something and then whine because it doesnt work right... ive heard it all now
    Stealing Ha!
  2. #42  
    Not to get completely network technical, but the phone acts as a router using a process called network address translation (aka NAT). This means that the source of the packet will get masked by the IP from sprint. This works just like a router for your home. The "Outside" IP is what you get from sprint. The phone keeps track of the "inside" traffic and does the forwarding to whichever device necessary. As has already been posted in this thread, your traffic CAN give you away. They may not be capable of telling you exactly what device your using but they have a "Norm" which they can compare to you based on normal Pre traffic and tell you there is more than there should be.
  3. #43  
    Quote Originally Posted by percyg77 View Post
    Call me paranoid but I thinkn Sprint turns off my data usage option remotely when I tether, using my tether alot. Sometime my internet will just stop working all of a sudden and I'll be puzzled as to why and I know for a fact that hadn't turned it off because it'll switch off by itself in the middle of surfing the web.

    Anyone else had this prob?
    You should not use Torrents or News Groups while tethering..



    Treo 600 -> Treo 650 -> Treo 700P -> Treo 800W -> Launch Day Pre (RIP 08/13/10) -> Replacement PRE
  4. #44  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post

    I work in a secure environment. If I hook something up as simple as a network hub (which is much more basic than what we're doing with tethering), I can expect a call from the Networking group within 15 minutes.
    That is because when a network device gets connected to any network it begins to broadcast packets so it can figure out how to play nice on the network. Those broadcast packets can be monitored on a low level to inform IT that a new device has been placed on the network.

    Pertinent to the discussion though, with NAT those packets don't leave the "local" network because they are on a different level than IP traffic.
  5. #45  
    I think that we are getting way too much into the whole "Can they tell?" thing ... Of course they can you don't get to have a company like Sprint without some sort monitoring system in place.

    I believe that there shouldn't be an argument on this, I think it should be obvious that Sprint knows, then again is just my opinion and it seems to be "JamesL" "hparsons" and others.

    However, I think the problem at hand right now is: Can you trick it so that you can continue to tether? I Don't think we are to judge if is good, bad or what not ... The fact of the matter is "It's happening"

    I used to be a customer care team lead @ this company, and I saw shady stuff happening which ultimately led me to quit, so trust me when I say: there is evil in both sides.

    The question remains: Can this be fixed, or do we all say bye to tethering?
  6. #46  
    If you have a tethering hack, the phone will drop evdo for about 20 seconds when you start tethering. This is normal. I'm not sure why it drops evdo, maybe it's some sort of network initialization process. But it then comes back and you can tether fine.

    On very rare occasions it will take a long time to come back. But I've only had that happen twice. I tether very rarely though.
  7. #47  
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesL View Post
    Not to get completely network technical, but the phone acts as a router using a process called network address translation (aka NAT). This means that the source of the packet will get masked by the IP from sprint. This works just like a router for your home. The "Outside" IP is what you get from sprint. The phone keeps track of the "inside" traffic and does the forwarding to whichever device necessary. As has already been posted in this thread, your traffic CAN give you away. They may not be capable of telling you exactly what device your using but they have a "Norm" which they can compare to you based on normal Pre traffic and tell you there is more than there should be.
    The packets have MAC addresses in them. That alone will identify to Sprint that the information did not come from one of their devices.
  8. #48  
    Quote Originally Posted by juancarloszx7 View Post
    I think that we are getting way too much into the whole "Can they tell?" thing ... Of course they can you don't get to have a company like Sprint without some sort monitoring system in place.

    I believe that there shouldn't be an argument on this, I think it should be obvious that Sprint knows, then again is just my opinion and it seems to be "JamesL" "hparsons" and others.

    However, I think the problem at hand right now is: Can you trick it so that you can continue to tether? I Don't think we are to judge if is good, bad or what not ... The fact of the matter is "It's happening"

    I used to be a customer care team lead @ this company, and I saw shady stuff happening which ultimately led me to quit, so trust me when I say: there is evil in both sides.

    The question remains: Can this be fixed, or do we all say bye to tethering?
    I don't think we have to worry about saying goodbye to tethering at this point. Sprint has already called a few customers out for tethering, and have (from what I hear) cancelled accounts with some. On the other hand, I know of at least one Pre user that has been tethering on occasion since the first hack came out on the Pre (and even before that on this alleged person's alleged Treo devices).

    The issue (in my opinion) is how much. If you are looking to use tethering with your Pre as a substitute for having an internet connection at home and/or work, don't expect the love to last.

    If you're using it occasionally to get access when nothing else is available (like tied up at the dock on your sailboat by some alleged user), I don't think you'll have an issue.
  9. #49  
    Quote Originally Posted by JamesL View Post
    That is because when a network device gets connected to any network it begins to broadcast packets so it can figure out how to play nice on the network. Those broadcast packets can be monitored on a low level to inform IT that a new device has been placed on the network.

    Pertinent to the discussion though, with NAT those packets don't leave the "local" network because they are on a different level than IP traffic.
    Trust me, that's not what they're monitoring.
  10. #50  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    The packets have MAC addresses in them. That alone will identify to Sprint that the information did not come from one of their devices.
    MAC addresses only travel as far as the next router. Since the Pre is doing NAT on the IP packets, I don't think the source device MAC makes it past the Pre. That said, there are plenty of other things they could look at so I think the point is moot.
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