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  1. jaman71's Avatar
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    #21  
    by your argument i think you agree with me. there is no problem here with torrents. however when 'companies' such as priates bay or the old you tube act as distributors and distribute IP content without paying the companies that spend billions a year creating (and paying others to create) that content then there in lies the problem. torrents are fine, its when they act as a distribution facilitator without paying for that right. as the courts are making clear, the days of pirates bay and others arguing that they are not responsible for what passes through their setups are ending.
    as for the morality of the end-user, in 1999 there weren't online options so people justified stealing it. today there are business models in place with amazon, itunes, hulu, joost, vod as well as many other alternatives. (all of which pay for the right to sell/distribute content) in 2009 there is no excuse not to pay for ip, other than thievery and a sense of entitlement. if you go to a restaurant, then order and eat a hamburger, you pay for that hamburger. simple as that. if you get a song, movie, software etc through torrents for the sole purpose of not having to pay for it, you are stealing. it is what it is and to call it any thing else is IGNORANT. Entertainment is now the only business where people feel like they are entitled to it. curious, what line of work are you in punzada?
    no how, excuse me now because ive got to get back to work creating content that many of you will steal in a few months.
  2. #22  
    I guess this is turning into a morality post so here goes...

    I'm not saying that stealing copyrighted material is right in any way but...it is the internet age. Information, legal or not, is spread instantaneously and we're only trying to make things faster.

    If something is worth having, there will always be many that obtain that material legally and many that steal. The "not so good" argument is that the media is being exposed to audiences that would have never purchased it even if there wasn't any other way. Yeah, I admit it's a bad argument, but you can't say 100% of pirated material are lost sales.

    "The man" can only hope to slow down this trend, but I don't see that happening without major government involvement that includes serious monitoring.
  3. gage006's Avatar
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    #23  
    Jabou, the problem is no one said anything before you. I don't think anyone here is arguing that they are entitled to free movies/music/games or whatever. You made that assumption based on the use of a protocol that is widely used legally. Don't go around throwing accusations or making assumptions, you're just encouraging the stereotype that people in your industry do not understand technology and the way the world works now.

    ps. I'm an avid Hulu, Netflix and Pandora user. I get my media legally and I think a lot of people still do. The only major company hurting is the RIAA and they deserve it.
  4. punzada's Avatar
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    #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by jabou View Post
    by your argument i think you agree with me...as the courts are making clear, the days of pirates bay and others arguing that they are not responsible for what passes through their setups are ending.
    No, we differ here. Legally going after people file-sharing the way organizations such as the RIAA and MPAA have has been down-right disgusting (MPAA hiring a hacker and paying them $15,000 for a list of TorrentSpy's internal e-mails, RIAA actually prosecuting and making examples of 12 year old girls). The people they need to go after through the courts have always been the worst of the offenders, the ones who make money off the distribution of other people's content. These are the people who should get the book thrown at them for simply making money off of other peoples hard work. The bootleggers, not the file sharers are the scumbags of this whole situation.

    Too much money will be spent by the industry lobbying for new, harsher laws and restrictions in order to attempt to protect IP then (as I said in my previous post) simply coming up with alternative revenue streams.

    Quote Originally Posted by jabou View Post
    in 1999 there weren't online options so people justified stealing it. today there are business models in place with amazon, itunes, hulu, joost, vod as well as many other alternatives. (all of which pay for the right to sell/distribute content) in 2009 there is no excuse not to pay for ip
    A major problem is that they are still doing a poor job of it. Reliability on proprietary and resource intensive codecs like flash, rolling releases of delays in certain markets over others (this last one in major, I know friends over in the UK that pirate US movie releases simply for the fact they have to wait X months after us to actually see it - same with aussie friends of mine having to wait sometimes a year to get a pc game - and a censored version at that). DRM has proven to be ineffective - just see iTunes dropping it, all it does is put a stranglehold on the consumer. These types of distribution *are* the future they just need to work on optimization, standardization, and addressing the reasons people pirate - it's not just people wanting a free ride (and the ones that do want a free ride, will never be the ones paying anyway and will always find 'alternative' methods, these are not your customers and you shouldn't try to cater or waste resources on them).

    For the record, I work in IT. I mostly do on-site technical support and network design for NY businesses and such (and let me tell you, a few bit-torrent users can be responsible for 90% of the bandwidth of an entire network - it can be annoying). I have a close friend that works in the entertainment industry, last known film was Transformers 2 that he worked on, unsure of his current project so I'm not entirely removed from it. I'm just strongly against the tactics of the MPAA, RIAA and think that more law and regulation of the internet is a bad thing for society as a whole and that there needs to be more creative ways to address the problem then simply 'fine them and throw them in jail.'
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