Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1.    #1  
    Engadget just posted a story of a game ported over to Zune HD and mentioned how it seemed very quick to do to port over iPhone apps. And it looks great.

    Game Ported From iPhone to Zune HD in 12 Hours - Zune hd apps - Gizmodo

    I commented on it on another thread here on a different topic but made me think and wonder...

    Seems so easy on Zune... How hard would it be to convert iPhone apps to Pre?

    I check and see that Microsoft even have tech article on their MSDN site on porting iPhone apps over...

    Porting the Amplitude Application from the iPhone to a Windows Mobile Device €“ a Case Study

    Can't Palm do something like that? If so, they need to come up with something like that to help Developers and that would help accelerate their app store.

    I'm thinking... whoever can provide the road map to porting iPhone Apps over to their phones will have and made the right phone will be able to play head to head with Apple almost immediately because with smartphones I think for smartphones going forward, it will be the apps that make the difference.

    For me, I know there are quite a few apps that I love on the iPhone and would find it hard to part with and finding it harder as more time goes by because they are getting so much better and the price is so cheap.

    I guess MS is seeing this also with their tech article.

    The longer many people hold on to their iPhones and get attached to their apps that they have put on to 'customize' their phones, the harder it will be to let go and go with another platform. Almost like being stuck with MS and Windows and leaving behind your apps to go to another platform.

    As I mentioned on another post...

    That Zune HD is sexy and love that GUI... if Mobile7 is anything as nice as that interface and they make a phone that looks like that Zune and have a large catalog of iPhone apps ported over to HD by the time they have a Zune phone, they could regain the mobile OS dominance. (Actually I think they are the top OS right now... but this would keep them up there.)
  2. #2  
    I'd say that it's probably pretty difficult to port an iPhone app to the Pre. I think you'd pretty much have to re-write the whole thing. Whereas winmo and iPhone both run compiled applications, the Pre runs interpreted code, not compiled. To go from iPhone to winmo, you'd have to change some things, but the basic structure is likely similar. On Pre, it would have to be totally restructured.

    Having said that, it's relatively easy for people who know web languages to code for the Pre. So assuming that the app concept could work with Pre's current limitations, it still may not take much effort to do it on the Pre. The Pandora app famously took only a few days to write.
  3. #3  
    Ohhhh I wish some iphone apps can be ported easily. I think it will be very hard since they don't have full access to the device/api's. I would very much like to see Newsstand for the pre.
  4. gage006's Avatar
    Posts
    543 Posts
    Global Posts
    576 Global Posts
    #4  
    iPhone uses C, Pre uses html/css/javascript. HUGEEEEE difference. Some things can easily be ported over, but some of the more advanced stuff is currently impossible or not officially allowed in the sdk (NaNplayer).
  5. s219's Avatar
    Posts
    498 Posts
    Global Posts
    1,008 Global Posts
    #5  
    It basically requires a complete re-write, and keep in mind that many things that we do in the iPhone SDK are not even possible with the webOS SDK right now.
  6. #6  
    A major issue with allowing compiled user-made programs on WebOS would be a decrease in security. It would allow for a number of security loopholes to be exploited.
    However...
    The software engineering needed to allow compiled programs to run on the Pre/WebOS would be minimal.

    A little more tricky, but perhaps a best-of-both-worlds situation, would be to create something of a sandbox environment which allows compiled programs to run on WebOS but in an emulator which limits access to the device's hardware and memory.

    If such an emulator could emulate the environment of iPhoneOS, we would see little-to-no effort in porting software. The catch is whether or not the Pre and/or Pixie would have the power needed to run an iPhoneOS emulator inside WebOS. Undoubtedly fewer cards would be opened at one time (perhaps one emulated piece of software at a time, and one less open card). This still whips the iPhone in multitasking ability. It would also instantly increase the number of available programs on the Pre to nearly equal the iPhone.

    I really hope Palm engineers are working on that. It would be a direct-hit bombshell in the war against the iPhone.
  7. s219's Avatar
    Posts
    498 Posts
    Global Posts
    1,008 Global Posts
    #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by GreenMississippi View Post
    A major issue with allowing compiled user-made programs on WebOS would be a decrease in security. It would allow for a number of security loopholes to be exploited.
    However...
    The software engineering needed to allow compiled programs to run on the Pre/WebOS would be minimal.

    A little more tricky, but perhaps a best-of-both-worlds situation, would be to create something of a sandbox environment which allows compiled programs to run on WebOS but in an emulator which limits access to the device's hardware and memory.

    If such an emulator could emulate the environment of iPhoneOS, we would see little-to-no effort in porting software. The catch is whether or not the Pre and/or Pixie would have the power needed to run an iPhoneOS emulator inside WebOS. Undoubtedly fewer cards would be opened at one time (perhaps one emulated piece of software at a time, and one less open card). This still whips the iPhone in multitasking ability. It would also instantly increase the number of available programs on the Pre to nearly equal the iPhone.

    I really hope Palm engineers are working on that. It would be a direct-hit bombshell in the war against the iPhone.

    Either that is wishful thinking on your part, or you're missing some of they key pieces of the puzzle. Palm already has enough on their plate as it is, they don't need to be chasing a hacker project that has a lot of technical hurdles. But nevermind that, it would put Palm in serious legal hot water. I don't think they even need to bother going down that road.

    Besides which, if Palm was going to that much trouble, technically and legally, they could easily develop their own native OS and SDK. It would probably be simpler. If they did it right, iPhone apps could port over without too much trouble. But I have my doubts we'll ever see a full native SDK on this platform; Palm is already betting the farm on webOS, and still struggling to make it happen.

    Now, I should note that the reverse -- porting webOS "Mojo" apps to the iPhone -- is fairly easy to do in most cases. I got one webOS app running within a webView shell on the iPhone to win a bet, and it was a piece of cake. Technically, you could even get multiple apps running within the webView and start emulating the "cards" multi-tasking metaphor. I have my doubts that this would be allowed in the App Store, however.

Posting Permissions