View Poll Results: Would you ditch Pre for Android?

Voters
417. You may not vote on this poll
  • YES

    39 9.35%
  • NO

    252 60.43%
  • MAYBE if the phone was right

    117 28.06%
  • Android?

    9 2.16%
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  1. eji930's Avatar
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    #41  
    If Palm Goes belly up, what happens to all the Pre users lol
  2. #42  
    I have a pre aand I am testing a mytouch 3g and I don't agree it is slow at all. I have 30 full apps installed and have had up to 10 things running in the background and haven't had any problems. The mytouch 3g here and europe has sold 1 million phones so far since april. Obviously htc is doing something right. If the mytouch was on sprint I would have one. Tons and tons of apps available including all the apps we have on our pre, except pandora, but its coming

    Still have 15 days left with the pre, hopefully and update will come out that will wow me away from android.
  3. #43  
    Quote Originally Posted by Aridon View Post
    Did you install task killer and if so how much stuff do you have open?

    See the issue is people leave 12 things open on their android device and then ***** about speed when the Pre will bog down with just the music player going and one other thing.

    Hell it doesn't even scroll smoothly ever, even with one thing open.
    I wouldn't say the Pre NEVER scrolls smoothly. But it is increasingly rare, even with the 1.1 update. And I've started to lose patience. Why add animations to stuff like the power bar at the top when they can't get them to consistently appear smoothly? It's embarrassing to see frames drop when no programs are opne, and it's only displaying the WiFi status.

    For all of the talk of Android phones running on underpowered hardware, it's much worse that WebOS is as laggy and stuttery on its next gen processor.
  4. #44  
    i had the g1 it wasnt polished either it was still in its infancy. internal memory was a problem with that phone and you werent able to save to sd, unless you rooted! i got an idea how about people make a phone that we dont have to waist our lifes figuring out how to root crap! and it crashed alot on peoples apps and even on its on in the os less often in the os though! regards.
  5. #45  
    I like Android and want it to succeed. The most important asset Android has is the tight integration with Google. If you're primarily a Gmail user it can't be beat.

    That said, after using the Pre I think Android's UI is missed opportunity. I think the one review that really nails down the differences and what makes the Pre unique is Hannibal's review on Ars Technica. Worth reading.

    From the beginning there were things about the Android UI that seemed redundant but I glanced over them. For example, having the app tray, and also the desktop, and optional folders on the desktop. The folders are too much hassle to open so I never use them to organize apps, and with the G1 there's so little memory, I'll never have that many apps to organize anyway.

    Same with widgets. An overhyped and useless feature on phones where mobile apps are already miniaturized. If you look carefully, all the widgets on the G1 and Hero are replacements for missing or badly designed UI functions. For example, because on Android an app takes the full screen and switching and closing apps is so clumsy, the Sense UI added more screens and filled them with widgets. The effect is mimicking webOS dynamic card switching. You just switch between screens to move between widgets. And those widgets are questionable to begin with.

    Why have a half functional Twitter client? Why leave out the posting feature from it? It could've been a full app, but if it was, you couldn't hang it as a widget on your desktop and pretend to switch to it. Then what about the quick settings widgets, that gives you access to WiFi, BT etc? webOS places a universal menu at the top right corner of the screen, no widget necessary. So really, those widgets are all about making up for lacking user experience and functionality.

    Aside from that, when I use my G1 now, although I much appreciate its Gmail PIM apps, I find the navigation and performance unpleasant. I don't know what HTC was thinking when it built that device on such weak foundations, and they keep using that platform, which is amazing to me. And they took away the keyboard, which is unacceptable, a deal breaker. I think they reasoned that they could afford to ditch the keyboard in light of the iPhone, and gain some battery capacity and compactness in return. Not the trade-off I'd want to see.

    So in all, I continue to root for Android, and its recent buildup is quite noticeable and encouraging. Lots of apps available with big names making appearances, it's pretty obvious that Android is going big. However, there are serious problems ahead: because it's free and open source, barriers to entry for Android devices are lower, and that leaves manufacturers with a dilemma. The incentive to use Android is very strong, but it's also hard to differentiate your device when everyone has access to the OS for free. The easiest way to differentiate is with a branded UI, like the Sense.

    We are going to see an onslaught of ridiculous and over the top UI efforts from every major Android vendor. In light of HTC's misconceived Sense UI, I shudder to think what Rachael would be like to use, and Motorola has already indicated yet another UI overhaul coming from them. None of those have design as their core competency, they are in this game because Android is free and open source. Again, they have no roots in UI development. Try and compare Palm's history with any of those, just totally different types of companies.

    In summary, I really doubt there will be any Android device in the near future that will appeal to me enough to switch from the Pre. I have many issues with the Pre, the list is long, but those are execution problems, not conceptual ones.
    Palm Vx > Treo 650 > Centro > G1 > Pre > BlackBerry 9700
  6. jcbone's Avatar
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    #46  
    Nope, not me, lovin the pre.
  7. #47  
    Quote Originally Posted by sivan View Post
    I like Android and want it to succeed. The most important asset Android has is the tight integration with Google. If you're primarily a Gmail user it can't be beat.

    That said, after using the Pre I think Android's UI is missed opportunity. I think the one review that really nails down the differences and what makes the Pre unique is Hannibal's review on Ars Technica. Worth reading.

    From the beginning there were things about the Android UI that seemed redundant but I glanced over them. For example, having the app tray, and also the desktop, and optional folders on the desktop. The folders are too much hassle to open so I never use them to organize apps, and with the G1 there's so little memory, I'll never have that many apps to organize anyway.

    Same with widgets. An overhyped and useless feature on phones where mobile apps are already miniaturized. If you look carefully, all the widgets on the G1 and Hero are replacements for missing or badly designed UI functions. For example, because on Android an app takes the full screen and switching and closing apps is so clumsy, the Sense UI added more screens and filled them with widgets. The effect is mimicking webOS dynamic card switching. You just switch between screens to move between widgets. And those widgets are questionable to begin with.

    Why have a half functional Twitter client? Why leave out the posting feature from it? It could've been a full app, but if it was, you couldn't hang it as a widget on your desktop and pretend to switch to it. Then what about the quick settings widgets, that gives you access to WiFi, BT etc? webOS places a universal menu at the top right corner of the screen, no widget necessary. So really, those widgets are all about making up for lacking user experience and functionality.

    Aside from that, when I use my G1 now, although I much appreciate its Gmail PIM apps, I find the navigation and performance unpleasant. I don't know what HTC was thinking when it built that device on such weak foundations, and they keep using that platform, which is amazing to me. And they took away the keyboard, which is unacceptable, a deal breaker. I think they reasoned that they could afford to ditch the keyboard in light of the iPhone, and gain some battery capacity and compactness in return. Not the trade-off I'd want to see.

    So in all, I continue to root for Android, and its recent buildup is quite noticeable and encouraging. Lots of apps available with big names making appearances, it's pretty obvious that Android is going big. However, there are serious problems ahead: because it's free and open source, barriers to entry for Android devices are lower, and that leaves manufacturers with a dilemma. The incentive to use Android is very strong, but it's also hard to differentiate your device when everyone has access to the OS for free. The easiest way to differentiate is with a branded UI, like the Sense.

    We are going to see an onslaught of ridiculous and over the top UI efforts from every major Android vendor. In light of HTC's misconceived Sense UI, I shudder to think what Rachael would be like to use, and Motorola has already indicated yet another UI overhaul coming from them. None of those have design as their core competency, they are in this game because Android is free and open source. Again, they have no roots in UI development. Try and compare Palm's history with any of those, just totally different types of companies.

    In summary, I really doubt there will be any Android device in the near future that will appeal to me enough to switch from the Pre. I have many issues with the Pre, the list is long, but those are execution problems, not conceptual ones.
    Very well written Sivan. Android has ways to go, the future is bright but also scary given all the manufacturers in play.

    I still feel that the
    Android platform is Palm's biggest challenge in the medium to long term, and not the iPhone or Blackberry. The sheer volume of gadgets that will hit the market soon will make it difficult for regular non-technical people to differentiate the Palm HW/UI from look alike Androids.

    Blackberry and Apple have the marketing muscle to create the appropriate branding/differentiation. Palm does not have the resources to scale quickly and also IMHO does not have the marketing capabilities.

    I don't know what the end game will look like, but Palm should watch that platform carefully.
  8. #48  
    I'll stick with WebOS for now until Google includes native EAS into Android
  9. jdale's Avatar
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    #49  
    Quote Originally Posted by Clack View Post
    One of the Advantage of Android over WebOS is Android's support of non-telecommunications devices.
    I don't see how this is an advantage for my phone. Yes, you can install Android on your refrigerator. Great?

    I switched to Sprint for the Pre. If I wanted Google to have access to all of my personal information, I wouldn't have waited for the Pre. But I don't want to put all my information in the hands of an advertising company, so no.
  10. #50  
    I was thinking about doing it for the Magic, but when i found out how severely underpowered it is, i wouldnt even consider it over my pre
  11. #51  
    Quote Originally Posted by sivan View Post
    I like Android and want it to succeed. The most important asset Android has is the tight integration with Google. If you're primarily a Gmail user it can't be beat.

    That said, after using the Pre I think Android's UI is missed opportunity. I think the one review that really nails down the differences and what makes the Pre unique is Hannibal's review on Ars Technica. Worth reading.

    From the beginning there were things about the Android UI that seemed redundant but I glanced over them. For example, having the app tray, and also the desktop, and optional folders on the desktop. The folders are too much hassle to open so I never use them to organize apps, and with the G1 there's so little memory, I'll never have that many apps to organize anyway.

    Same with widgets. An overhyped and useless feature on phones where mobile apps are already miniaturized. If you look carefully, all the widgets on the G1 and Hero are replacements for missing or badly designed UI functions. For example, because on Android an app takes the full screen and switching and closing apps is so clumsy, the Sense UI added more screens and filled them with widgets. The effect is mimicking webOS dynamic card switching. You just switch between screens to move between widgets. And those widgets are questionable to begin with.

    Why have a half functional Twitter client? Why leave out the posting feature from it? It could've been a full app, but if it was, you couldn't hang it as a widget on your desktop and pretend to switch to it. Then what about the quick settings widgets, that gives you access to WiFi, BT etc? webOS places a universal menu at the top right corner of the screen, no widget necessary. So really, those widgets are all about making up for lacking user experience and functionality.

    Aside from that, when I use my G1 now, although I much appreciate its Gmail PIM apps, I find the navigation and performance unpleasant. I don't know what HTC was thinking when it built that device on such weak foundations, and they keep using that platform, which is amazing to me. And they took away the keyboard, which is unacceptable, a deal breaker. I think they reasoned that they could afford to ditch the keyboard in light of the iPhone, and gain some battery capacity and compactness in return. Not the trade-off I'd want to see.

    So in all, I continue to root for Android, and its recent buildup is quite noticeable and encouraging. Lots of apps available with big names making appearances, it's pretty obvious that Android is going big. However, there are serious problems ahead: because it's free and open source, barriers to entry for Android devices are lower, and that leaves manufacturers with a dilemma. The incentive to use Android is very strong, but it's also hard to differentiate your device when everyone has access to the OS for free. The easiest way to differentiate is with a branded UI, like the Sense.

    We are going to see an onslaught of ridiculous and over the top UI efforts from every major Android vendor. In light of HTC's misconceived Sense UI, I shudder to think what Rachael would be like to use, and Motorola has already indicated yet another UI overhaul coming from them. None of those have design as their core competency, they are in this game because Android is free and open source. Again, they have no roots in UI development. Try and compare Palm's history with any of those, just totally different types of companies.

    In summary, I really doubt there will be any Android device in the near future that will appeal to me enough to switch from the Pre. I have many issues with the Pre, the list is long, but those are execution problems, not conceptual ones.
    There is just sooo much wrong with most of your statements.

    I don't have the time or patience to pick apart your post and write a detailed (and accurate) one in response. I guess you'll get away with spreading the FUD about android on these pre forums... oh well.
  12. #52  
    WebOS for me, not android.
  13. #54  
    Quote Originally Posted by notaphonegeek View Post

    You probably wouldn't agree with their review of the Pre.
  14. Clack's Avatar
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       #55  
    Quote Originally Posted by DougB541 View Post
    You can innovate on an experience. And while similar to the iPhone, it easily surpassed it in usability (IMO).

    To me, thats innovation (synergy, notifications, slick calender help a bit too).
    Well, the failure of deliver in the SDK and app store at the Launch of the Pre itself contradicts your analysis.
    "We must not contradict, but instruct him that contradicts us; for a madman is not cured by another running mad also." - Dr. An Wang
  15. #56  
    Actually, it wasnt too bad. Better than the Hero. I just dont think the edges are as sharp as people say they are.
    Palm Pre Review - Palm pre review - Gizmodo
  16. #57  
    Quote Originally Posted by Clack View Post
    Well, the failure of deliver in the SDK and app store at the Launch of the Pre itself contradicts your analysis.
    What part may I ask?
  17. Clack's Avatar
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       #58  
    Quote Originally Posted by DougB541 View Post
    What part may I ask?
    Your presumption that the Palm Pre represents and revolution rather than evolution from market leader Apple.
    "We must not contradict, but instruct him that contradicts us; for a madman is not cured by another running mad also." - Dr. An Wang
  18. #59  
    I don't recall ever saying anything about revolutionary?

    I said that WebOS to me has innovative features. Just because it doesn't match iPhone feature for feature right now, doesn't make it not innovative.


    (besides, this app circle jerk i've not been a part of...check my posts. Never a determining factor for me.).
  19. #60  
    Would depend on the phone here - But I'm a huge WebOS fan now - So it would take a phone with the same features, speed, flip out keyboard, size of screen, etc - for me to even consider it. Then there would have to be some other app or development reason for me to make the switch.. But without the same features, no way.

    Shane Menshik
    D2 GLOBAL INC.
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