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  1.    #1  
    My searches came up empty...

    Anyone know if the font for eMail replies can be changed? I hate Times New Roman...
  2. #2  
    I would be interested in the answer too.

    The email, when you are typing it in, shows the beautiful Pre sans serif font. However, when you send it, it comes through in Time Roman. Interestingly enough, my signature remains the wonderful sans serif????

    There has to be a way in which you can force the email program to use the nice Pre font? As a matter of fact, I thought when I first got the phone, it would send the entire email in the pretty font. Was something changed in the 1.1 update?
  3. squeff's Avatar
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    #3  
    I can't get it to do this. When I send an e-mail to myself, it comes back with the sans serif font. Ditto if I reply to a message from myself.

    Keep in mind that non-Pre recipients won't have the Pre font, anyway, so I presume that you're not expecting users with other mail programs to be able to see that particular font.
  4. #4  
    Well, I would have assumed they had a font like Arial setup as the substitute for the sans serif font they have.

    It has to be working at some level as when I send an email it comes through with the body of the email as Times Roman; however, my signature (setup in the email preferences) comes through in the sans serif font and it is a different size. So, what ever font the sig is, comes through just fine.

    Basically, they need to allow the formatting that is happening at the sig level to be used in the body of the email.
  5. squeff's Avatar
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    #5  
    Well, from an end-user perspective, they do not allow typeface selection. The only end-user options are bold, underline, italics, and colors. While I can't manage to duplication this, I wonder if explicitly setting the color (for example) would force the Pre to use the proper font. It might be that it's simply not setting a font for the body and leaving it to your e-mail client to decide what to do with it?

    I wouldn't be surprised if one of the homebrewers/rooters came up with some additional font tools for e-mail. But, as it stands, what it does it what it does.

    Try the color setting and report back if that helps.

    "Well, I would have assumed they had a font like Arial setup as the substitute..."

    Keep in mind that font mapping is more based on the receiving client. If you're using IE on a Windows machine to read Gmail, you may get a different result than reading it with the Pre's e-mail client.
  6. #6  
    /usr/palm/applications/com.palm.app.email/stylesheets/email.css

    In a section commented email read-view (message) specifics surrounded by a box of asterisk. About line 511 (webOS 1.1) for those looking at line numbers. I was thinking email-readview-content segment (line 654 [webOS 1.1]) would alter the body of the received email being viewed. However changing the font size in that segment, rebooting my pre, and then opening an email I had didn't appear to alter the size of the text. I'm assuming though that somewhere in this part of the code would be the part to add a specified font to the style. Of course I may be completely off track as I'm still trying to understand what all these little segments do. I've been poking around trying to find out how to edit font sizes as I want to reduce a lot of the font sizes to allow more text to be viewed on the screen in areas where there is a lot of text. So far I have only figured out where the segment is for text entry fields. I've changed font sizes specified in other areas but haven't noticed it actually change anything.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by squeff View Post
    Keep in mind that font mapping is more based on the receiving client. If you're using IE on a Windows machine to read Gmail, you may get a different result than reading it with the Pre's e-mail client.
    You are most certainly correct. My earlier assumptions were misguided. I still would hope that Palm would come up with some way to force the use of the Sans Serif font (Arial?). But, I guess we will have to wait for that.
  8. #8  
    This is actually kind of a bigger problem that it initially seems, I think.

    If you're using a corporate email with EAS, for example, and the desktop clients use Arial, your responses from the Pre will not only be in Times New Roman, it also changes the entire text of the original to Times New Roman as well. It really messes up the "uniformity" of email appearance in a way that could easily be addressed if you could just change the font.
  9. squeff's Avatar
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    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Likingthepre View Post
    You are most certainly correct. My earlier assumptions were misguided. I still would hope that Palm would come up with some way to force the use of the Sans Serif font (Arial?). But, I guess we will have to wait for that.
    For this to work, the following must happen:

    (1) The Pre must allow the creation of HTML (or RTF) e-mail. If it sends plain text e-mail, then fonts are irrelevant. Fortunately, the Pre does this.

    (2) The Pre must allow the selection of fonts. It doesn't allow the selection of typefaces, right now. Just styles (underline, bold, italics, color).

    (3) The Pre must include the font in the HTML or RTF, in a way that's compliant with relevant standards. I know for HTML, there are "correct" and "incorrect" ways to include font information. I'm far from an expert, but I think that e-mail often uses the "incorrect" method, since the use of styles and style sheets would be cumbersome for e-mail. However, I may be way off on this point, so don't quote me on this.

    (4) The receiving e-mail program must properly render the HTML/RTF. This can be a big "if," since not every e-mail client renders the same way. For example, a HTML e-mail on my old Blackberry looked nothing like it did in Gmail. And it would still different, still, in Outlook.

    (5) The receiving e-mail program (or underlying OS) would need to appropriately do font substitutions. There is a science to this, but I've seen too many shortcuts, where any font that's not a match is automatically set to something that may be totally different. I cannot tell you the number of Word documents I received that have fonts that get changed to Shruti, even though there are plenty of closer matches.

    (6) Related, keep in mind that not every computer has Arial. There are plenty of computers and devices that have similar, but not exactly the same, sans serif fonts. Or, which may have non-scalable (e.g., TrueType) fonts, such that your message text can get properly mapped (because it's in 12 point), but your signature (which is in 6.5 point) cannot.
  10. #10  
    @ squeff: all of that may be true, but it really shouldn't be a big deal to allow you to choose a font in an email program. I mean, Blackberries manage to do it.
  11. squeff's Avatar
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    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by awesomepatrol View Post
    @ squeff: all of that may be true, but it really shouldn't be a big deal to allow you to choose a font in an email program. I mean, Blackberries manage to do it.
    Totally agree. However, you'll notice that the Pre, unlike the Blackberry, doesn't allow you to picks for anything! On the Blackberry, you can pick a font for menus, for text, within e-mail, for the calendar, and so forth. While it can sometimes get confusing, the ability to pick fonts is a strength of the Blackberry.
  12. #12  
    It is my understanding that CSS controls a lot of the looks of the apps we have currently. I need to learn how CSS works. I've only by trial and error figured out how to change a couple font sizes the text entered into a text input and the size of default entered text that is the type your message here stuff seen in the message app etc. But I'm assuming we can specify the fonts we see along with font sizes using the CSS. The thing is I'm thinking in order to allow for a drop down choice of font there has to be a way to override an apps CSS with another CSS or if it is possible use a variable as the font specification so that what ever font is picked then is the font. I don't know enough to say if either is possible. I'm going to audit javascript at my local college to get a refresher on it. I haven't figured out where to start for CSS. And it would be nice to have a text book learning process for making apps for webOS as I get sort of confused on the flow of code in these apps. If I can figure out the flow I can't really dissect how the apps work from the inside.

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