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  1.    #1  
    If Palm keeps a more hands off approach than Apple how will it ensure that most applications are top grade?

    Palm could set standards/guidelines but what happens if developers don't adhere to them? Should/would Palm reject the apps? If not, how will the 'bad eggs' be prevented from flooding the store?

    I think this will be more of a challenge for Palm, especially if it's that much easier to create applications for their platform. Right?
  2. Romanmb's Avatar
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    #2  
    There's a difference between guaranteeing quality apps and censoring out certain apps the way apple does...
  3.    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by romanmb View Post
    There's a difference between guaranteeing quality apps and censoring out certain apps the way apple does...
    I know there's a difference. That's why my post is focused on quality apps and not on censorship of certain apps.

    Do you think Palm will try to filter out less than stellar apps?
  4. #4  
    If you meen ensuring all apps are
    "quality" than I would hope not. Rather I would hope palm ensures that each user can easily find apps that the user themselves would consider quality.

    One mans trash and all that nonsense.
  5. IMethos's Avatar
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    #5  
    ???
    Any/all apps should be allowed.By who's standard should one be allowed and one be disallowed? how is that any diff than what apple has done?
  6. #6  
    I hope there will be quality apps. I have two I plan on submitting this upcoming weekend and hope mine are considered high quality, heh .
  7. JKTex's Avatar
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    #7  
    I certainly hope they at least look at apps for operating integrity. If not, they could have users complaining about things they can't control and would cause more headache than it's worth.

    But look at the Palm Dev forum. Palm is putting feelers out to developers to test the water as to what's ready, not ready, wanting to wait for pay option etc.
  8. #8  
    The downloading community will tell you the quality....just like reading reviews on Amazon before you buy. If it's crap, you can bet there'll be allot of vocalization. Palm need not get involved.
  9.    #9  
    People complain about the 'fart' apps in Apple's App Store and have mentioned that this won't be the case with Palm's App Catalog. It's not clear that Palm can/should prevent 'fart' apps...time will tell.
  10. #10  
    Palm's in a bit of a different situation than Apple if they follow through on their stated goal of allowing sideloaded applications. That way, they can enforce quality and other standards in the App Catalog and be free from charges of... well, whatever.
    Treo 600 > Treo 650 > HTC Mogul (*****!) > HTC Touch Pro (***** squared!) > PRE! > Epic
  11.    #11  
    I think that people will complain if Palm tries to enforce quality in the App Catalog. I think a key challenge they would have is explaining what is good vs. unacceptable 'quality.' As Windzilla pointed out above, "One mans trash and all that nonsense."
  12. wicketr's Avatar
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    #12  
    "quality apps" - I would assume that to mean apps that don't have memory leaks or steal your phone numbers and post them to marketing sites, other security issues, etc.

    Then Apple extends that to try and make sure developers follow guidelines so that apps behave somewhat similarly between app to app (aka "look and feel").

    And then Apple extends that layer to filter out applications they don't want
  13. #13  
    Seeing as there are two ways to load apps to the device, the app catalog and side loading, I don't think there are any issues of the end user not having access to anything they desire to have on their device if someone is willing to make an app to fill that desire. There are ways to design apps to require some form of validation (if one wishes to charge for their app and prevent people from getting the app and not paying for it) and not have it in the app catalog. So I really don't see the app catalog as a potential hindrance to what apps the users can have. Obviously having an app in the app catalog is your maximum potential exposure for an app so that more people could be using/buying the app as a result. I intend on using people from the community to test apps and likely will put them all in the app catalog. At this time I haven't really decided what kinds of apps I want to make yet. Outside of copyright infringement and apps so buggy they can harm the device they get installed to, or require age restriction to use the app (porn for example) I don't think apps should be restricted. In fact my original impression about the app catalog was that it would be completely open, aka no approval process etc like apple since the whole approval process has been a negative thing in the sight of the public.
  14. #14  
    This is a good thing. They have many people who can sift through apps. Once they get sent in, there should be someone testing out each app and doing some kind of rating system, and if they see that it is a useful/fun app, they give it a go.
  15. Tricia's Avatar
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    #15  
    I'm all for operating integrity but after that, if you don't find an app to be up to snuff, just don't use it.
  16. #16  
    Exactly. Good point.
  17. #17  
    I would imagine that there would definitely be some kind of QC; otherwise, Palm could find themselves in a very bad spot with customer complaints from adversely affected phones. But alas, I don't work for Palm so that's just conjecture at this point.
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by wicketr View Post
    "quality apps" - I would assume that to mean apps that don't have memory leaks or steal your phone numbers and post them to marketing sites, other security issues, etc.

    Then Apple extends that to try and make sure developers follow guidelines so that apps behave somewhat similarly between app to app (aka "look and feel").

    And then Apple extends that layer to filter out applications they don't want
    I hope that Palm helps prevent security problems, memory leaks, etc.

    But I hope that Palm does not enforce the webOS Fischer-Price look and feel. I think that the Fischer-Price looking apps will not do well against products that will use an over age 4 interface.

    - Craig

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