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  1. Carobu's Avatar
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       #1  
    Well....I did something stupid, as I was gaining root on my Pre, and setting up quilt, the package manager etc. I went to set up my user account, I set my user to my name, nick, however, when it asked for a password, I put a very simple dummy password I often use on my linux installs, well, it said it was too simple and asked asked for a new one. So, I typed on of my more complicated passwords, well, it then said, error, passwords do not match and said setting to previous or default, I don't remember what it was. Now attempting to SSH in, and type my password, serves me no good, as even though I have my own user name, I don't know my password, I've tried the two I used, and some simple ones, like blank, admin, root, administrator, etc. But I have no idea what to do, what's the default password? anyone have any clues? or at least, how can I reset it? (though I don't think that's possible for the su user on linux is it?)
  2. Carobu's Avatar
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       #2  
    Update:
    I can still use Novaterm to get in and have root on that, but that doesn't do me as much good as novaterm doesn't function quite as well as putty, and I'd like to be able to use SSH in the future. Anyone know if there's a way to change my user password from a root terminal?
  3. dizzwave's Avatar
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    #3  
    Hey Carobu, I did the exact same thing.. That password script is obviously not bulletproof, eh?
    So I logged back in as root (via USB, blank password), and tried my limited Linux knowledge at changing my new user's ('dave''s) password. It appeared to work at first, but then would say "could not save /etc/passwd file -- file system is read-only" or something similar to that. I read somewhere that I needed to remount something, but it scared me away.. I'm not Linux-knowledgable enough to run commands when I don't totally understand them. After monkeying around more (tried to delete user 'dave', even), to no avail, I just re-ran the dang optware installer again, this time using username 'david' and a fo-sho complicated enough password. Seemed to work fine -- I just have that extra 'dave' user hanging around there, but no harm. I'll just use 'david' to login.
    I hope that helps..
    -dave (or david, take your pick.)
  4. Carobu's Avatar
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       #4  
    ohh I can actually help with this one, thanks for the help though, I didn't think about that, the command to remount it well still being used as read write is this

    mount -o remount,rw /

    maybe we can help each other here, how'd you go about trying to change the password?
    I'm a unix IT specialist, but I've got no formal training, so I don't know the terminal too well, I just remember a bit from my previous fixes etc, and the mount command is something I remember.
  5. dizzwave's Avatar
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    #5  
    Let's see, if you're logged in as root, you can say
    passwd nick
    and that'll prompt you to enter the new password and confirm it (IIRC). Right after confirming it is where I got the read-only thing.
    Thanks for your help.. So remounting doesn't "do" anything I wouldn't want? (I'm a software developer, but my knowledge of unix and file systems in general is sorta limited.. )
    ANYway.... I won't need to do that, cuz I just exchanged my Pre last night for a nice tight non-Oreo...... so I'll be starting all over with rooting it, and probably won't have to remount after all!
    oh and FYI, there's another forum on this site for the geekier stuff like this.. I forget what it's called, not the Homebrew forum but something like WebOS Developers. It gets plenty of traffic and they'd answer these questions much better than I would.
  6. Carobu's Avatar
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       #6  
    huh, I'll keep all of that in mind, thanks for the help, and no, enabling read write would just basically open the whole flash rom inside to be used like a flash drive or a hard disk, it can be potentially bad, as if you used a command like, "sudo rm -rf " you could wipe the whole OS out, but if you're just changing the user password, and setting it back, you won't do any damage, thanks again though, I'll check out that section in the future if I need more help.
  7. Carobu's Avatar
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       #7  
    :Update

    Just confirmed it myself, if you ef up the password thing, you can enable read write and just change your password, no problem at all.
  8. #8  
    One side note, and you'll probably kick yourself over this one, when Linux warns you that that password is too short, too simple, whatever, it's not rejecting the password, it's just warning you. You can still use the password you entered. Just enter it again.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    One side note, and you'll probably kick yourself over this one, when Linux warns you that that password is too short, too simple, whatever, it's not rejecting the password, it's just warning you. You can still use the password you entered. Just enter it again.
    I had this happen and sure enough it was as advertised just a warning

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