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  1. jtiis's Avatar
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       #1  
    (taken from iLounge home page)

    Following the rejection of Google’s official Google Voice app and the subsequent removal of all third-party Google Voice apps from the App Store, a number of developers have voiced their concerns over the long-term viability of the platform, with at least one vowing to move on to other platforms. Second Gear developer Justin Williams, maker of the iPhone app FitnessTrack, has written a lengthy piece describing some of the core problems currently facing iPhone developers, most notably lack of feedback for developers and an unsustainable pricing structure. Williams finishes the post by stating that he is “seriously considering” selling off his two iPhone properties and leaving iPhone development behind because he believes the App Store “as it presently stands is not capable of providing a reliable and consistent means of income.” A brief summarization of the piece is available in the form of a Twitter update, which reads, “Baseless app rejections, an unsustainable pricing structure, ****-poor developer relations and a blackbox review system. Where do I sign up?”

    In response, Craig Hockenberry, who, along with his Iconfactory colleagues, received an Apple Design Award for the iPhone version of Twitterrific, said he is “seriously doubting the long-term viability of this business,” while Frasier Spiers, developer of the Flickr app Darkslide who announced last year that he would not write another new application for the iPhone as long as the App Store stayed as it was (and is), has used Twitter to describe the App Store as “high risk, low probability of reward, [with] many insurmountable factors totally [outside] your control.” Finally, Layton Duncan of iPhone development house Polar Bear Farm has written an equally-lengthy piece further discussing App Store issues, and announcing that “[a]s with many other serious iPhone developers recently, we’ve made the hard decision to kill all but one project in progress, and stop investing any resources in creating new applications. We’ll continue to sell and fully support our existing iPhone offerings, however we’re already moving to platforms which show signs of real viability.”

    So, maybe a few a growing tired of Apples with with Apps and will write for the dark side...
  2. #2  
    I guess its a battle of Andriod and webOS to become the dominant new Smartphone OS. But we still have BlackBerry in our way.

    We welcome whomever with eager arms!!
  3. #3  
    Unfortunately, as much as I like my Pre, the tone of what I just read doesn't bode will near-term. With the current state of WebOS, the fact that there is no way to obfuscate the code, I can't see developers like those mentioned in the article flocking to the Pre.

    Obviously, there are lot of enthusiasts pushing out HomeBrew, and I suspect that there are some talented enough developers that will write code that's difficult to reverse engineer; but the problem is that if the app is good enough, someone will do it.

    I suspect we'll see something from Palm in the near future that will allow WebOS code to obfuscated, and an SDK for more serious programming.

    I'm pretty much counting on both.
  4. #4  
    I don't think obfustate or not obfuscate is the main problem. I mean, people can clone your app easily, compiled or not, obfuscated or not. This isn't the main problem here. If an usefull app costs a few bucks most people will buy it. The marginal people that always do piracy will continue doing it, no matter the cost of this. I've been asked about how to crack freeware apps on other forums, and I believe this kind of people simply don't pay for anything, and never will do. So piracy is a marginal problem, and intelectual property is too. If the price tag is the correct one, you will reach more incomes than with upper price tag, and a more realistic customer base statistics, that allows you to get more info for future apps, or future updates of your apps.
  5. #5  
    To my mind, the only thing standing in the way of Palm making some great strides with all this talk is, really, Palm. I've been a defender of Palm's slow and steady approach to date, but really this is too huge an opportunity to overlook. Releasing many more apps and showing the App Catalog to be eas(ier?) to work with would be a great move about now...
    Treo 600 > Treo 650 > HTC Mogul (*****!) > HTC Touch Pro (***** squared!) > PRE! > Epic
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by deCorvett View Post
    ...
    If the price tag is the correct one, you will reach more incomes than with upper price tag, and a more realistic customer base statistics, that allows you to get more info for future apps, or future updates of your apps.
    Quote Originally Posted by wynand32 View Post
    To my mind, the only thing standing in the way of Palm making some great strides with all this talk is, really, Palm. I've been a defender of Palm's slow and steady approach to date, but really this is too huge an opportunity to overlook. Releasing many more apps and showing the App Catalog to be eas(ier?) to work with would be a great move about now...
    I agree on both of these points. We really do need to start seeing some good, low price apps soon.

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