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  1.    #1  
    I know that Nextel uses the IDEN network and Sprint uses CDMA... but when I looked at my coverage for Sprint, it says i'm roaming. Nextel says I have good coverage so I was wondering if the pre would work on Nextel's network.
  2. #2  
    I doubt it. They are as has been stated different networks and protocols. Chips used are different to. Sorry to burst your bubble.
  3. SharonW's Avatar
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    #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by sotapoprox View Post
    I know that Nextel uses the IDEN network and Sprint uses CDMA... but when I looked at my coverage for Sprint, it says i'm roaming. Nextel says I have good coverage so I was wondering if the pre would work on Nextel's network.
    Well, have a look at this post I made a bit back. Isn't push-to-talk a Nextel thang? That's always been my understanding.

    http://forums.precentral.net/palm-pr...ml#post1708973
  4. #4  
    mech1164 is not wrong. The Pre can't work with/on the Nextel network. The 2 networks use completely different technology. Pre uses a CDMA radio and Nextel phones use a iDEN (basically TDMA) radio.

    If the Pre is to get PTT functionality it will be as a iDEN phone or use a CDMA service like Verizon is doing right now with their PPT service.

    But don't trust me on this, Google it.
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    #5  
    If you are roaming then it will either be on the Verizon or Alltell network.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by packfanlv View Post
    If you are roaming then it will either be on the Verizon or Alltell network.
    You forgot a few more CDMA carriers like US Cellular.
    Palm History: Palm III>IIIc>CLIÉ NR70v>CLIÉ TG50>Tungsten C>Treo 650>Treo 700p>Centro>Pre!! 6/5/09
    Phone History: Way too long

    Sorry Timmy, SERO does not work with the Pre.
    If you have an iTouch click me.
  7. #7  
    roaming on sprint is better then iden any day i dens voice coverage sucks, the only thing iden is good for is push to talk.
  8. SharonW's Avatar
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    #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by ryleyinstl View Post
    mech1164 is not wrong. The Pre can't work with/on the Nextel network. The 2 networks use completely different technology. Pre uses a CDMA radio and Nextel phones use a iDEN (basically TDMA) radio.

    If the Pre is to get PTT functionality it will be as a iDEN phone or use a CDMA service like Verizon is doing right now with their PPT service.

    But don't trust me on this, Google it.
    Okay then. What's your best guess on which PTT service it has or will have given Sprint's VP of Marketing is touting Pre's PTT?

    Donahue said today that Sprint would provide compelling reasons for business users to buy the Pre, such as its Direct Connect push-to-talk technology and its low-cost enterprise plans.
  9. #9  
    QChat
  10. SharonW's Avatar
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    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by BlaqkAudio View Post
    QChat
    And how does QChat work? Is that a software program or something?
  11. darrenf's Avatar
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    #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by SharonW View Post
    And how does QChat work? Is that a software program or something?
    Qchat is implemented as technology in the handset (starting with the hardware PTT button) that transmits and received PTT traffic over CDMA. It is also implemented through a gateway at Sprint that shuttles this traffic back and forth between the iDEN and CDMA networks, as needed, to let you talk with users on iDEN or hybrid phones in addition to Sprint CDMA handsets.

    -darren
  12. SharonW's Avatar
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    #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by darrenf View Post
    Qchat is implemented as technology in the handset (starting with the hardware PTT button) that transmits and received PTT traffic over CDMA. It is also implemented through a gateway at Sprint that shuttles this traffic back and forth between the iDEN and CDMA networks, as needed, to let you talk with users on iDEN or hybrid phones in addition to Sprint CDMA handsets.

    -darren
    Big thanks! So then would it require anything more than an appropriated button? It doesn't sound like it if it's all CDMA initially. And if it is a gateway at Sprint that shuffles the traffic between iDEN and CDMA wouldn't that then mean shuffling between Sprint and Nextel?
  13. #13  
    qchat works by sending the PTT voice channel as VOIP over the EVDO data network. It's pretty suboptimal compared to alternative ways like the Kodiak Networks gear which handles it as a voice call with enhanced signalling and bridging. VZ has had little luck with qchat too. It doesn't work very well.

    The reason the nextel signals seem to be more robust than the sprint CDMA network is that the iDen system runs down low, in the 800 MHz band and penetrates buildings pretty well. Sprint's CDMA system runs at 1900 MHz and doesn't do as well. You can make up for this by deploying a lot more tower sites, but Sprint hasn't done that in a lot of markets.

    That's why Sprint's CDMA network gets complaints about coverage compared with AT&T and VZ, and even compared with Nextel iDen.

    This really isn't that fixable without a lot of money. Eventually, Sprint wants to deploy a new network down low in the 800 Mhz band after their swapping with public safety is done, but that requires turning off the iDen network, and qchat isn't working well enough to get users to move, and if they just turned the nextel network off, they'd lose almost all those customers to AT&T and VZ.
  14. SharonW's Avatar
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    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesm View Post
    qchat works by sending the PTT voice channel as VOIP over the EVDO data network. It's pretty suboptimal compared to alternative ways like the Kodiak Networks gear which handles it as a voice call with enhanced signalling and bridging. VZ has had little luck with qchat too. It doesn't work very well.

    The reason the nextel signals seem to be more robust than the sprint CDMA network is that the iDen system runs down low, in the 800 MHz band and penetrates buildings pretty well. Sprint's CDMA system runs at 1900 MHz and doesn't do as well. You can make up for this by deploying a lot more tower sites, but Sprint hasn't done that in a lot of markets.

    That's why Sprint's CDMA network gets complaints about coverage compared with AT&T and VZ, and even compared with Nextel iDen.

    This really isn't that fixable without a lot of money. Eventually, Sprint wants to deploy a new network down low in the 800 Mhz band after their swapping with public safety is done, but that requires turning off the iDen network, and qchat isn't working well enough to get users to move, and if they just turned the nextel network off, they'd lose almost all those customers to AT&T and VZ.
    But, in essence, right now they'd be running packets over to Nextel and Nextel works well, right? I can see where the building penetration would be a big benefit to construction workers. Once the building is framed in they need to keep on top of what everybody is doing just as much, if not more, having no visuals.

    And, by what you're telling me, VZ and A have nothing better in that they use QChat, too, but not iDEN. Is that correct?
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by SharonW View Post
    But, in essence, right now they'd be running packets over to Nextel and Nextel works well, right? I can see where the building penetration would be a big benefit to construction workers. Once the building is framed in they need to keep on top of what everybody is doing just as much, if not more, having no visuals.

    And, by what you're telling me, VZ and A have nothing better in that they use QChat, too, but not iDEN. Is that correct?
    VZ also uses qchat, but AT&T uses the Kodiak solution which I understand works much better. The main reason is that CDMA networks can't do voice calls and data at the same same, so if you want PTT to work when someone is using a browser, you have to use a VOIP style solution. It kinda sucks. UMTS has no such limitation, enabling AT&T to use a solution that much closer to how iDen works than qchat.

    Building penetration tends to be important to all users. I was at the movies the other day with my wife, and my Pre had no service in the theater while my wife's iPhone was downloading emails just fine.

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