Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22
  1. #2  
    Yeah I check that site daily being in the IT field myself. Basically same story regarding coding webOS apps. Let's hope we find out soon how easy it is.
  2. #3  
    Great article.

    You know this really makes you think with the growing use of cloud services in the PC world will web browsers become more like WebOS (think Google Gears, widgets and addons) changing the way we think of what a web browser is (which seems to be the current trend). Or will operating systems in PC's evolve to the WebOS model unifying all the different OS's out there and allowing developers to write applications with a greater compatibility across different platforms?

    If this did become a trend for the way operating systems are built, using the language of the web to run applications, it has the potential to make companies like Microsoft and Apple less relevant in the OS market which to some extent would force them to reinvent themselves.

    Or maybe I just had one too many beers and I'm making no sense?
  3. #4  
    Umm, not trying to be a wet blanket but here's what the developer of Datebk6 thinks:

    > I understand that the Pre may be able to run Datebk in emulation. But will
    > there be a Pimlico program designed to work with the Pre's WebOS? Is that
    > what Pimlical will do?
    >
    >
    This has been discussed; the answer is that we don't know because Palm has
    not released information on the Pre's SDK other than to a few partners, NOT
    including Pimlico Software. The "next generation" of Datebk,Pimlical (which
    is now available for Windows) is a Java app, and can be ported to any
    platform that supports a Java Runtime Environment (JRE) with minimal effort.
    There are currently JREs for most smartphones except the iPhone. If the Pre
    supports a JRE then it would be possible to port Pimlical to the Pre. But
    until Palm releases the Pre and tells us what development environments it
    supports any answer would be a wild guess. Even if the Pre does have a JRE
    it would probably not be high on the list of platforms to support Pimlical
    unless it really takes off. There are millions of Blackberries, Androids,
    Symbian and other phones already in the market that should be higher on the
    list of future platform support. Unless Palm can make CESD a really good
    offer (as Handspring did many years ago). But at present Palm appears to be
    in the business of alienating developers rather than supporting them.
    best,
    Larry
  4. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by deesugar View Post
    Or maybe I just had one too many beers and I'm making no sense?
    You are making a lot of sense... that is why Microsoft is way ahead of you on that...

    Azure Services Platform

    Not to mention all the other "little" steps microsoft is making... that most won't notice or care to notice right now. Microsoft is going to make a strong case to be the OS choice for cloud services... if it goes that way.

    Could be more open... who knows right now...
    01000010 01100001 01101110 00100000 01010100 01101000 01110010 01100101 01100001 01100100 00100000 01000011 01110010 01100001 01110000 01110000 01100101 01110010 01110011 00100001
  5. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by RolandStone View Post
    Umm, not trying to be a wet blanket but here's what the developer of Datebk6 thinks:But at present Palm appears to be
    in the business of alienating developers rather than supporting them.
    best,
    Larry
    Obvious what is happening...

    The guys/gals with access are "talking up" Palm Pre (and thus talking up their products).

    Palm is working with a "manageable" group of developers and not moving fast enough for those not included.

    Things will come... everyone will have to be patient.

    So far I like what palm is doing and how they are pacing themselves... I'm hoping for success here... I think they are working toward success...
    01000010 01100001 01101110 00100000 01010100 01101000 01110010 01100101 01100001 01100100 00100000 01000011 01110010 01100001 01110000 01110000 01100101 01110010 01110011 00100001
  6. #7  
    I was about to post this article. Can a developer out there try to elaborate on this article?
  7. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by theog View Post
    You are making a lot of sense... that is why Microsoft is way ahead of you on that...

    Azure Services Platform
    Interesting.

    I figured they'd do something like that but even though they're trying to "Microsoft" the web with .Net, they're only competing for the sever segment right now. I always thought their bread and butter was from the PC OS software. In the past they could be like the Soup Nazi to consumers by saying, "No Software for you!" unless you ran Windows. This time around I'm not sure if they'll be able to do that. You can't hear the name Microsoft without thinking about the word "monopoly" and all the bitter little things that happened along the way to cause resentment.

    In the beginning they were one of the first solutions on the scene to provide a computing platform for basically one device, the PC. Now they're jumping in about the same time as everyone else and the big difference this time is there is a sea of different devices running different operating systems and the overall user experience for everyone is generally good.

    Unless they hijack the web and "Microsoft" it, I don't see how they're going to get back the consumer OS segment once everyone is working off the cloud.
  8. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by RolandStone View Post
    Umm, not trying to be a wet blanket but here's what the developer of Datebk6 thinks:

    > I understand that the Pre may be able to run Datebk in emulation. But will
    > there be a Pimlico program designed to work with the Pre's WebOS? Is that
    > what Pimlical will do?
    >
    >
    ...But at present Palm appears to be
    in the business of alienating developers rather than supporting them.
    best,
    Larry
    Wow, those are strong words. But then I can see how these guys are feeling a bit left out in the cold. I can't imagine that they're high on Palm's list, since Palm's calendar program is all new, and Pimlical would probably need a lot of support to make something work properly. Right now, Palm is only putting effort into 3rd party apps that add to the Pre. If the new calendar application and synergy are as great as they appear to be, what does another calendar app really add? Or, taken another way, if it does add something, maybe Synergy isn't all it's cracked up to be.

    I think this is a natural part of the birth of a new thing. In trying to be inclusive of a lot more new developers, some of the old ones will be left out.
  9. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by deesugar View Post
    Interesting.

    I figured they'd do something like that but even though they're trying to "Microsoft" the web with .Net, they're only competing for the sever segment right now. I always thought their bread and butter was from the PC OS software. In the past they could be like the Soup Nazi to consumers by saying, "No Software for you!" unless you ran Windows. This time around I'm not sure if they'll be able to do that. You can't hear the name Microsoft without thinking about the word "monopoly" and all the bitter little things that happened along the way to cause resentment.

    In the beginning they were one of the first solutions on the scene to provide a computing platform for basically one device, the PC. Now they're jumping in about the same time as everyone else and the big difference this time is there is a sea of different devices running different operating systems and the overall user experience for everyone is generally good.

    Unless they hijack the web and "Microsoft" it, I don't see how they're going to get back the consumer OS segment once everyone is working off the cloud.
    Soup Nazi? That does not make sense... MS has always built a platform and welcomed developers. My partnership (if you want to call it that) went better than with Apple... by a long shot.

    I can hear "microsoft" without thinking monopoly...

    Anyway, you have a point someplace in that... let me see if I can find it.... hmm... I can't.

    I'm sure you did not understand what I originally posted... more than likely why you can't see how they would stay in the consumer OS segment... (if that is an option... in the long term). Oh, well... lol
    01000010 01100001 01101110 00100000 01010100 01101000 01110010 01100101 01100001 01100100 00100000 01000011 01110010 01100001 01110000 01110000 01100101 01110010 01110011 00100001
  10. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by theog View Post
    Soup Nazi? That does not make sense... MS has always built a platform and welcomed developers. My partnership (if you want to call it that) went better than with Apple... by a long shot.
    I guess I should start off by saying, I'm not a developer. The Soup Nazi comment was a reference to Microsoft dominance in the software market. When you have almost 90% of all PC's running Windows you have an ecosystem where all things Microsoft can be sold and if you happen to be a consumer on another OS but want to run MS applications or be compatible with them (Office for Apple excluded) tough luck, And yes I know there are plenty of free and alternative software out there that does the same stuff for people but let's face it most consumers still buy MS Windows Apps. This ecosystem keeps consumers in the MS purchasing cycle when choosing future PC, laptops and devices.

    But this cycle seems to be breaking down and now your starting to see in increase in sales of Apple computers due to iPhone's own ecosystem drawing them in. New netbooks running user friendly versions of Linux seem to still be coming out every day. That coupled with people getting used to working on the cloud are indicators that this dominant cycle MS has been happy to have might be slipping away.

    You'd probably be shocked to hear I actually like Microsoft and think their OS is pretty good. I admire their ability to gobble up companies and assimilate that technology into their own, it's quite impressive for such a big company. So I'm not a MS basher at all, I just find it interesting when tech trends change and products like the Pre make you think differently about how we will approach computing in the future.
  11. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by deesugar View Post
    I guess I should start off by saying, I'm not a developer. The Soup Nazi comment was a reference to Microsoft dominance in the software market. When you have almost 90% of all PC's running Windows you have an ecosystem where all things Microsoft can be sold and if you happen to be a consumer on another OS but want to run MS applications or be compatible with them (Office for Apple excluded) tough luck, And yes I know there are plenty of free and alternative software out there that does the same stuff for people but let's face it most consumers still buy MS Windows Apps. This ecosystem keeps consumers in the MS purchasing cycle when choosing future PC, laptops and devices.

    But this cycle seems to be breaking down and now your starting to see in increase in sales of Apple computers due to iPhone's own ecosystem drawing them in. New netbooks running user friendly versions of Linux seem to still be coming out every day. That coupled with people getting used to working on the cloud are indicators that this dominant cycle MS has been happy to have might be slipping away.
    Problem is that has NOTHING to do with Microsoft! How is Microsoft at fault? Heck, apple shot themselves in the foot each time they changed platforms. Okay, not really "shot themselves" since they did "need" change... but each time they changed (ie 9 to OS X), they lost developers and customers.



    Quote Originally Posted by deesugar View Post
    You'd probably be shocked to hear I actually like Microsoft and think their OS is pretty good. I admire their ability to gobble up companies and assimilate that technology into their own, it's quite impressive for such a big company. So I'm not a MS basher at all, I just find it interesting when tech trends change and products like the Pre make you think differently about how we will approach computing in the future.
    Actually most large companies "gobble up" smaller companies... you don't read or hear about it much though. One guy on another forum had his company gobbled up by a training company... that company relaunched his product within 20 months as their own.

    You could look at google and grandcentral... or google period... I could go on.

    At any rate, I'm not sure what "phone" developers think (far as development)... personally, I don't see the pre as anything special (OS wise). It is built on top of Linux, such as google android and an entire host of other tech toys. Pre has a nice interface and I'd guess some very interesting technology included... but I'd not say it "rocks" or makes me need one. (I want one and will get one...)

    Innovation came with (drum roll) iphone... that was like "wow." And I don't like the iphone, would not own one. But I can respect the tech.

    I think palm is making the right decisions during this launch... fortunately, they are pissing off some developers. That is a good sign.. palm is not large enough to be all things to all people. I only hope they are being all things to the right people.

    On my end, I've thought about developing for a phone... and I'm sure I will one day, but right now it does not interest me... I'm still stuck on the aging desktop. Would be nice to come out with a smooth app, sell for $3 and have billions of people purchase it.
    Last edited by theog; 04/18/2009 at 08:09 AM.
    01000010 01100001 01101110 00100000 01010100 01101000 01110010 01100101 01100001 01100100 00100000 01000011 01110010 01100001 01110000 01110000 01100101 01110010 01110011 00100001
  12. #13  
    These are the types of articles that make me think Palm has a bright future, assuming the Pre gets them past their financial troubles of course. If developers are stoked about the platform (and there was a very similar article at Ars Technica not long after CES) that means very good things indeed.

    I've posted before about how little I value the financial press. I don't think I've singled out the Motley Fool in particular but they've been so egregious in the past that I actually have them filtered out of my Yahoo Finance pages. When people get in a tizzy about a couple of bad articles, know that this says far more. I was tempted to get involved in those threads but it wasn't worth the energy.

    As for Pimlical, that seems to be a combination of things. One is that they weren't selected as one of the early developers and so are currently locked out of development. Another is that they bet on Java and don't seem interested in rewriting for other platforms, which ironically locks them out of the iPhone as well. I don't see Java coming to webOS any time soon. Maybe at some point in the indefinite future, but not soon. Combine that with the fact that they're probably a small company with limited development resources, and thus it doesn't make sense to chase after an untested platform that would require a full rewrite.

    So I think it's a combination of sour grapes (a popular Palm OS developer feeling snubbed for being locked out) and rational business decision making (it would require far too much development effort for an unproven platform.) I do wish however that Palm would try to cater more to traditional app developers (binary API anyone?) since there's no reason it has to be either/or. You can have the web model and the standard model on the same device, as we're seeing with Classic.
  13. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by theog View Post
    Soup Nazi? That does not make sense... MS has always built a platform and welcomed developers. My partnership (if you want to call it that) went better than with Apple... by a long shot.

    I can hear "microsoft" without thinking monopoly...
    I know it's off topic, but I'll bite.

    Yes, MS welcomes developers, as long as they are developing softwae that runs exclusively on the MS platforms. Java ++ was an attempt to force Java developers to do MS only (until Sun stopped them), C++ was an attempt to force C code to MS only, .NET was an attempt to make everythig internet become everything MS.

    I think that was the point of the post.
  14. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    Java ++ was an attempt to force Java developers to do MS only (until Sun stopped them), C++ was an attempt to force C code to MS only, .NET was an attempt to make everythig internet become everything MS.
    I can see your point on all of these save, "C++ was an attempt to force C code to MS only". C++ was an AT&T Bell Laboratories invention.
  15. #16  
    Funny, this article just came out today and talks about a lot of the things said in this post.

    Post-Windows Era:
    Have we arrived in the post-Windows era? | Between the Lines | ZDNet.com
  16. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by hparsons View Post
    Yes, MS welcomes developers, as long as they are developing softwae that runs exclusively on the MS platforms. Java ++ was an attempt to force Java developers to do MS only (until Sun stopped them), C++ was an attempt to force C code to MS only, .NET was an attempt to make everythig internet become everything MS.
    Quote Originally Posted by potter View Post
    I can see your point on all of these save, "C++ was an attempt to force C code to MS only". C++ was an AT&T Bell Laboratories invention.
    I think he means J++ and C#. Also, .NET wasn't really targeted at co-opting the internet. It's instead becoming the de facto Windows API for everything that doesn't need low level access (games, anti-virus, etc.) It's only come to the internet in a significant way since the advent of Silverlight 2.0. Maybe you meant ActiveX?

    Anyway, furthering my other post, Palm stock is up to over $10 so far today, I'm guessing based on the Merrill/BofA upgrade to buy. So that means other organizations and investors aren't buying into the bad articles either. (Even if they were, Wall Street groupthink can be wrong.) Fortunately the two threads about them seem to have died off. There really was no point in getting worked up about it.
  17. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by GregV View Post
    As for Pimlical, that seems to be a combination of things. One is that they weren't selected as one of the early developers and so are currently locked out of development. Another is that they bet on Java and don't seem interested in rewriting for other platforms, which ironically locks them out of the iPhone as well. I don't see Java coming to webOS any time soon. Maybe at some point in the indefinite future, but not soon.
    OTOH, with Java they can support all the "open" Smartphone OSs (Blackberry, Windows Mobile, Android, Symbian). The only currently released Smartphone platform they can't support is the closed iPhone platform. That's probably not a platform that appeals to their core user base given the poor PIM software on the iPhone. It's also possible that Apple would not let them release their apps on the iPhone since they compete with some of the built in apps.

    I am not sure if I would consider WebOS an open platform or not. WebOS may be based on Open Standards but only allowing developers to use Web standards isn't very open IMHO.
  18. #19  
    Quote Originally Posted by deesugar View Post
    Funny, this article just came out today and talks about a lot of the things said in this post.

    Post-Windows Era:
    Have we arrived in the post-Windows era? | Between the Lines | ZDNet.com
    Much in that article is just plain wrong. Vista failed because it was bloated and inefficient, many people access their Yahoo or Gmail via the standard IMAP and POP protocols.

    There are some excellent web based applications in common use such as Google Maps but there are a lot more hard to use and poorly performing web based apps. The failure of Linux in the Netbook space is evidence that the ability to run Windows apps still matters.
  19. #20  
    Linux didn’t fail - it was muscled out by Microsoft practically giving away XP so it didn't lose more market share.
    "'Form follows function' that has been misunderstood. Form and function should be one, joined in a spiritual union."
    Frank Lloyd Wright
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions