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  1.    #1  
    LBS App Developers Prefer iPhone, Android, WinMO and J2ME Says Skyhook - WIRELESS AND MOBILE NEWS


    "Developers of location aware applications (LBS apps) are not interested in creating apps for the Palm WebOS or Symbian platforms, reports Skyhook Wireless.

    Developers primary application development environments included iPhone, Android, Windows Mobile, J2ME, and Symbian. These developers are using location in 21 different types of applications, ranging from education to entertainment, finance to music."


    the value of it.
  2. dave75's Avatar
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    #2  
    Really, they prefer OS's that they can actually write software for right now? Thanks for the link, but that survey is kind of dumb. They make no mention that there isn't a device with WebOS out yet. I think those results will be a little different in a few months.
  3. bullet317's Avatar
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    #3  
    I think in time once the phone hits the market and the phone gets out there that the developers will start making programs for the phone at a brisker pace. I mean that is how them make money and since the phone touts an easy to program OS then the developers will jump on the bandwagon.
  4. #4  
    When there are 1 million Palm Pre's in the wild the software will come.
    Palm Vx -> Treo 600 -> Treo 700p -> Centro -> Pre (Launch Phone 06/06/09) -> AT&T Pre Plus with Sprint EVDO swap -> Samsung Epic 4G w/ Froyo
  5. #5  
    Agreed, it seems biased the way it is presented...as if it is a judgment on WebOS. It's not even out yet...and many details are still unknown. The bigger story there is the lack of interest in Symbian IMHO.


    As a developer, I decide to develop for a platform based on a number of reasons, including:


    - Size of market

    WebOS market doesn't exist yet...but we'll see what happens...it could grow fast. iPhone market is huge. Android types are geekier in general and far less likely to pay for things, but that may change. There are a *lot* of Android-based phones coming out in the next 12 months...so this market may get huge fast.


    - Ease of development

    WebOS looks nice in this respect at least for initial cost of entry and programming model. Free tools and an SDK that plugs into Eclipse and runs on any platform are also nice. Lack of access to the metal sucks though. Android is very nice in this respect. Perhaps the king. iPhone is a pain in the ***. NDAs and needing to turn to IBM for a non-Apple based development platform suck. I also don't like the box that my code has to live in.


    - Ease of porting apps for multiple platforms

    Android rules here...since it supports Java and is very easy for us to move business apps to the device. WebOS will most likely fare the worst in this respect. If I wanted an app based exclusively on web-based technologies, I'd do it server-side and just give you the URL. Sure, disconnected operations are nice...and I understand that I get widgets and a pseudo MVC framework, but this WebOS model does seem fairly limiting...and I can get disconnected ops from Google Gears. For a client-side app, I'd like an established OO-based language with access to the rich array of existing libraries - e.g., Java, J2ME, J2EE, C#, .Net...and the Java (vs. MS) tech stack is far more open and flexible.


    - Ease of distribution...and flexibility, including direct installation


    WebOS seems like it will be about as good as Android in this respect. Both distribution models are far superior to the iPhone's...but the Apple Store sure does move a lot of apps...and those consumer types don't mind paying for them. We'll see what happens in the fat middle.




    Other factors also way heavily, including DRM and intellectual property concerns...and I have some very real concerns about the WebOS model that Palm has not addressed yet...and they have been asked numerous times.


    We'll see what happens...but I expect we will see a huge amount of WebOS development by the end of the year if Palm and Sprint don't screw this release up...and if the hardware stands up. For business apps, though, I'm not seeing it yet. We have a heck of an easier time moving existing code to Android...and as I said, there are a *lot* of Android-based devices on the horizon. That may be why so many developers are leaning that way.

    Steve
    Last edited by scuba_steve; 04/08/2009 at 04:25 PM.
    IIIx -> Tungsten T -> Treo 650 -> Treo 700p -> Launch day Pre
  6. #6  
    Vendors write apps where they think they can make a profit. If the Pre takes off, the apps will follow. If the Pre is a small niche product, they won't. Simple as that.

    Developers don't write for Windows because Windows is such a wonderful environment. They write to Windows because it's a huge opportunity.
    Bob Meyer
    I'm out of my mind. But feel free to leave a message.
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by meyerweb View Post
    Vendors write apps where they think they can make a profit. If the Pre takes off, the apps will follow. If the Pre is a small niche product, they won't. Simple as that.

    Developers don't write for Windows because Windows is such a wonderful environment. They write to Windows because it's a huge opportunity.

    Agreed...and that is my "size of market" criterion...which also must factor in "what is the likelihood that the users of this OS are likely to buy an app?" For the iPhone, that potential is huge. For WinMob, it's fairly poor...but porting a .Net-based *business* app is trivial for WinMob...so you must break down developers into those writing for the consumer masses and those doing custom business apps. I think Palm is going for the former...and that's where the money is for them.

    That all said, ease of porting is also key. If I can move an app from one platform to another with very little effort (say 10% of full development cost), then I'll do it...even if the market is small. It's worth it if I can recoup more than that 10%. J2ME offered that potential...but it is dying. Frankly, the OS developers are not doing much to help developers in this respect...and IMHO, it's by design. They want lock-in...and to force developers to choose.
    IIIx -> Tungsten T -> Treo 650 -> Treo 700p -> Launch day Pre
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by US NEws
    Skype has no plans to write software for the Palm Pre, a company exec said today. The Internet phoning company says it has plenty on its plate with this week's launch of an iPhone app, and one coming for the BlackBerry in May.

    "We want to see how that device sells," COO Scott Durchslag told reporters. "If [the Pre] takes off, it's something we'll consider."
    if skype is any indication, then we can obviously see how companies will want to obviously want to "wait and see"

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