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  1.    #1  
    I have been reading every piece of info on the Pre since it was announced. I currently use a Blackberry Curve and have owned Treos, Iphones, the G1, and and many different Windows Mobile devices. I am a smartphone fan so take this post fwiw.

    How much mainstream appeal do you think the Pre really has? Why would the average non-fanatic consumer looking for a smartphone buy the Pre over the Iphone, Blackberry, Android, or WM products? Do you think these "new" concepts like "clouds" and "web based apps" will appeal to consumers or just turn them away?

    Granted there is not much information out on the Pre yet and everything is purely speculation at this point, but it seems like the Pre is too complicated when it really is supposed to make your life more simple.

    Some have said this phone is being touted as an Iphone killer. I am by no means an Apple fan boy but the Iphone is simple to use, has great applications, and most importantly, the average consumer understands what it does before they buy it. It works like a "normal" smartphone in terms of contact management, applications, etc. Same with the Blackberry's, WM products, and Android. Again, why would the Pre appeal to somebody over the other options?

    I am very interested in the Pre and am eagerly awaiting any new information that comes out. Just wondering everybody's thoughts on this.

    ***Edit****
    Wanted to add "Palm OS" devices to the list of "other products" also. I haven't used Palm OS since my Treo 600 days but I know many are still using.
  2. #2  
    From what I saw on the demo video, Pre should be easy to use, or at least no more complicated than iPhone/WM devices. However, I must say that it is a bit more complicated than Palm OS (Treo 680 etc). Palm OS was easy to use, but again, everyone said Palm OS was dead.

    As to who would want to buy a Pre - In general, it would be the "younger" generation that lives on the net (anyone with multiple calenders, contact lists, active on the social networking, multiple IM / Email accounts) would like to "merge" all the information at one place with a mobile device. It reminded me what Bill Gates stated "information at your figure tips" I believe after 20 years Bill Gates promise, Palm actually delivered it with Pre.
  3. #3  
    I showed it to a friend I consider to be part of the mainstream, and she wanted it instantly, and that was before I told her all the integrated address book type features. (I couldn't describe it to her as "Cloud" features because she'd have no idea what that means).

    Though, full disclaimer, I convinced said friend to get a Centro because she wanted something cheap with a full keyboard for texting (and also because other smartphone devices are too complicated). Considering she has no aftermarket applications on the device though, I still say she's part of the mainstream market.
  4. #4  
    Originally posted by BGRO:
    . . .How much mainstream appeal do you think the Pre really has? Why would the average non-fanatic consumer looking for a smartphone buy the Pre over the Iphone, Blackberry, Android, or WM products? Do you think these "new" concepts like "clouds" and "web based apps" will appeal to consumers or just turn them away?.. .
    When the iPhone first came out, it didn't have apps. That and AT&T is why more Palm users didn't move over to it. The iPhone was a nifty touch screen on your iPod, and it was attached to a phone. That alone gave it appeal. The one issue I have w/ my iPod is no speaker. The iPhone took care of that and combined two devises into one. Just like the original Treo took care of three.

    To have iPhone type appeal to the masses, the Pre need to give reviews on it's sound/media capabilities. Everyone new that there iPhone could combine their iPod and phone. Even kids run around w/ IPods and cell phones. The mass isn't going to care about the applications, they weren't using them previously. They are going to care about the media "Will this really replace my MP3 player (providing good or great sound) or will I still be stuck with two devices.

    Other than that, the web pages, e-mail application, and great maneuverability (not having to go back to home or close applications) will get them.

    I'm a Palm fan and it has me even w/o the apps. Because the developers have been so loyal to the old Palm, I expect to be able to replace all my applications in the new Palm. Sometimes it takes a leap of faith and in my case, carrier jumping (if Sprint isn't ridiculous about the monthly price).

    I know a lot of people are talking about the initial cost. I'm more concerned about the ongoing cost for the device. For us Palm OS loyalist and especially those that used Clies, we previously paid $300-500 for our PDA and paid for a separate phone($99 - $300). We also purchased applications and still pay for upgrade on some of them. In other words, the initial cost will be substantially less than we previously paid. It's the ongoing cost that could make it prohibitive.
  5. cgk
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    #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by BGRO View Post
    Do you think these "new" concepts like "clouds" and "web based apps" will appeal to consumers or just turn them away?

    Customer: So how does it work?

    Salesperson: You can get your facebook and gmail on it - look, it shows you who's on line so you can reply to them instantly!

    Customer: Cool!



    The word "cloud" is never going to be mentioned to the customer, the word "web based app" is never going to mentioned to the customer. People who use outlook from their desktop and worry about syncing splash id are the weirdos (and I'm one of them) not the mainstream. This is a forum for people who think about those things too much, our very interaction here shifts us out of the mainstream..

    So yes, I think this can be sold to the mainstream.
    Last edited by CGK; 01/12/2009 at 05:09 AM.
  6. cgk
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    #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by publicid View Post

    As to who would want to buy a Pre - In general, it would be the "younger" generation that lives on the net (anyone with multiple calenders, contact lists, active on the social networking, multiple IM / Email accounts) would like to "merge" all the information at one place with a mobile device. It reminded me what Bill Gates stated "information at your figure tips" I believe after 20 years Bill Gates promise, Palm actually delivered it with Pre.
    Bingo - they want information and presence not productivity.
  7. #7  
    Ding ding ding!!!
    I think we have found the right answer.
  8. cgk
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    #8  
    and further to that, it seems to me that a lot of the complaints here fall into two broad categories:

    1) I don't see how this will improve my productivity/allow me to perform business task X

    People in the forums have been outlining all sorts of scenarios where they see the pre fail to meet their business needs "what if I'm tied up in a small room and someone is beating me with a rubber hose, how can I edit my spreadsheets?" and so on?

    Isn't the point here that the Pre is not a business/productivity device as summed up by one of the VPs in the TC hands on video - Blackberry is for work, this is for the rest of us.

    This is where the core difference is - the pre will allow you to organise your time and yes check your work calendars but it's about information management and networking (where you use the device to see where work fits around your life) not productivity management (where you use the device to do your work)

    This is a device, first and foremost for mainstream consumers to communicate with each other and keep connected with their friends and work. Someone will surely writes a spreadsheet app, that's nice but frankly palm does not seem to care and neither do the people who this phone is aimed at. It's a bolt-on, it's not the core purpose of the phone.


    2) I don't see how I upgrade from Palm OS to this because of...

    Is this the second problem? That people think this is suppose to represent an upgrade/new direction for PALM OS users - because I don't think it is. PALM OS users are just another group of people (like WM people, like people who have used dumb phones) who can either buy one and start from scratch with the rest of us or not. The paradigm they are used to is not the one represented in this phone and they feel left out in the cold.
  9. #9  
    I moved along from the Palm OS a few years ago. When I did move there were some apps that I really missed. Now that I am on WM, I can not think of one app that I could not live without.

    The Pre has Google Maps, Gmail, and Calendar. For me, that is all that is needed, and I would imagine that is all most people need.

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