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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by daThomas View Post
    Web apps mean you can pretty much write whatever you want. Has anyone seen a dev kit? All it would be, I assume, is a browser with the same css/javascript support as the phone.

    Not sure the quality of apps we will be getting if they need to be written in HTML or javascript.
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by jhoff80 View Post
    I think you'd be better off hoping for Styletap to make a Web OS version of their software.
    Or perhaps someone to release an ALP phone with a Treo Pro form factor.
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by ADGrant View Post
    Or perhaps someone to release an ALP phone with a Treo Pro form factor.
    ALP is the same old Palm OS though with a facelift. Nothing like Web OS. But if that's what you want, that's what you want.
  4. DrewT3's Avatar
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    #24  
    I found this demo of some advanced javascript + HTML 5, it is an MSX emulator (an old game machine?)

    http://jsmsxdemo.googlepages.com/jsmsx.html

    You need Firefox or Opera to run it.

    This emulates the hardware of the MSX using javascript and the display uses HTML 5 features. This is the type of technology that WebOS will support.

    I found this demo interesting and it could show the possibilities and limits of what you can do with the latest versions of html and javascript.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by jhoff80 View Post
    ALP is the same old Palm OS though with a facelift. Nothing like Web OS. But if that's what you want, that's what you want.
    Its a bit more than that. It is linux based like WebOS so it should provide robust multitasking and support for 3G GSM, Wi-fi, GPS etc. Of course the problem is you really want native apps to take advantage of that multi-tasking. It probably wouldn't attract enough app developers.
  6. #26  
    Now that's pretty interesting, that MSX emu. (And, it runs much, much faster in Chrome than Opera, FWIW.)
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by deesugar View Post
    What I'm concerned about most (and someone correct me if I'm wrong) is having web connected apps written in HTML, CSS and JavaScript. Wouldn't this give carriers greater control and power over your installed apps?
    HTML doesn't mean web-connected. The HTML the apps are written in is stored and served from the device.

    That said, they did say that to get new apps, you'd go through an online app store, that allows Palm (and probably Sprint) to approve the apps, though they said they'd use a security criterion (no viruses) rather than Apple's more restrictive (we don't approve certain kinds of apps we find competitive, or whatever) approach.
  8.    #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by Iggie View Post
    HTML doesn't mean web-connected. The HTML the apps are written in is stored and served from the device.
    Maybe I'm reading this all wrong but I thought Palm was all about being web connected. It seems to me the moment you start the device it connects to the web and starts syncing all of it's apps. I know that doesn't mean you cant make an app that wont connect to the Internet but I'm talking about intentions and where this road could lead us.

    Am I the only one who see's the possibility of Sprint gaining a little bit more control then they used to?
  9. DavidJ's Avatar
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    #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by Geo-Treo View Post
    ...but with Sprint having a big stake in it you can almost guarantee that there will be a short leash tied to Sprint apps and plans. As the "pre" eventually makes its way to other carriers and phones, things may open up but by then the more developed systems (Android, iPhone, RIM, Symbian, WinMo) will leave very little room for Palm. I'm not sure why developers will bother with it.
    What does that mean? With all my other Palms / Treos from Sprint I've never been restricted to which Palm apps I could run. Maybe I'm mis-understanding you, but Sprint doesn't limit what you run on the Palm/Treo's...

    Also, I think you're completely wrong with your evaluation. I am 100% convinced this is only the beginning of an exciting opportunity for both Treo & Sprint. The marketing of the product will be executed flawlessly and I know that this product is already a success.
  10. #30  
    Quote Originally Posted by deesugar View Post
    Maybe I'm reading this all wrong but I thought Palm was all about being web connected. It seems to me the moment you start the device it connects to the web and starts syncing all of it's apps. I know that doesn't mean you cant make an app that wont connect to the Internet but I'm talking about intentions and where this road could lead us.

    Am I the only one who see's the possibility of Sprint gaining a little bit more control then they used to?
    I misunderstood your emphasis.

    For many apps, you're right - "cloud computing" - data is stored in the cloud, but I'd expect in most instances that has little to do with Sprint. If I were to have, say a fantasy football app, you'd connect with my server, not Sprint's to sync data.

    For other apps, like calculators, etc., they don't need to send data to/from the device.

    Also, since this will ultimately be multi-carrier, if Sprint does greedy things with their apps store (their only place to be coercive, I think), it's an opportunity for competitive advantage to another carrier. That said, I take some solace in their explicitly saying their intent to be open (as Android) rather than like Apple.
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    #31  
    A few more details about the developer experience for webOS over at ars technica:
    http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post...s-new-sdk.html
    Handspring Visor Platinum > Treo 300 > Treo 600 > Treo 650 > Treo 700p > Centro > Pre > FrankenPre 2
  12. #32  
    Quote Originally Posted by kasi1222 View Post
    A few more details about the developer experience for webOS over at ars technica:
    http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post...s-new-sdk.html
    Very interesting and it does reassure me a bit that Palm is going to allow a fairly open system. Remains to be seen how widespread the access is though.
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