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  1. chris42's Avatar
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       #1  
    Hi there,
    Wasn't there a feature before to ignore a n incoming call by turning the phone around?

    If not: Would be a nice patch.

    Greetings
    Chris
  2. #2  
    turn? Like spinning it in the air? Or tossing it into the trash?
  3. #3  
    I fumble around and turn my phone all over and ever which way...I'd be "ignoring" my wife multiple times a day.



    Sayyyyyy...That IS a nice patch idea!!



    LTTVIMH
  4. chris42's Avatar
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       #4  
    Turn like: you put it face down on the touchscreen
  5. #5  
    I remember a phone that had this but it wasnt this phone. It would have to do with the accelerometer I would think. Im not a developer so I dont know if can be done with the Pre.
  6. JJCook's Avatar
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    #6  
    I also really liked the option to send a text message to an incoming caller telling them you can't take their call. That was a PalmOS feature. I used it a lot with my brother-in-law!
  7. #7  
    This would use the proximity sensor folks.
    Like this :
    Palm IIIx >>> Palm V >>> Palm Vx >>> Tungsten T5 >>> webOS 2.1 emulator

    Pre|central Peacekeepers
    SO easy anyone can do it! HP webOS First App Tutorial

    If i have helped you; please click the Thanks button.>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
  8. #8  
    This looks possible idk if HP gives the API's for that.
    Palm IIIx >>> Palm V >>> Palm Vx >>> Tungsten T5 >>> webOS 2.1 emulator

    Pre|central Peacekeepers
    SO easy anyone can do it! HP webOS First App Tutorial

    If i have helped you; please click the Thanks button.>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
  9. #9  
    Actually, it would use the accelerometer, not the proximity sensor. I have an N900 and can use this feature for hanging up active calls, ignoring incoming calls, turning loudspeaker on for active calls or disabling the loudspeaker.
  10. #10  
    Why not just install the "power button to end calls" patch?
  11. #11  
    tapping the power button silences the ring (ignores the call)... Is that what the OP wants?
  12. chris42's Avatar
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       #12  
    Intention of the flip idea is, to eliminate the need to pull the phone out of a cover or pouch.
  13. #13  
    I can easily tap the power button while it is in the pouch.
  14. LA6507a's Avatar
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    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cantaffordit View Post
    I can easily tap the power button while it is in the pouch.
    I completely agree. I love the simplicity of the power button double tap. I don't know if it is a rip off any other devices out there but I find I can easily double tap the power button while my phone is in it's case or my pocket, as opposed to having to take it out and flip it over (how many times would it ring in that amount of time?).
  15. chris42's Avatar
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       #15  
    Again: intention of the flipping is to NOT take it out of the pouch. And yes I understand that some people do not need nor want this.

    So the ones that can reach the power button in the pouch can stop reading the post. For the others this would be a patch request.

    Any developer up to this?
  16. #16  
    Samsung does it, on their galaxy S11, great feature
    If this helped you hit thanks.
  17. #17  
    Samsung Galaxy S II review -- Engadget

    Samsung also throws a trifecta of motion sensor-assisted functions into the Galaxy S II. The first is something you might be familiar from HTC's Sense: flipping the phone to face the floor mutes all sounds, whether they be incoming calls or media playing on the device. Unlike HTC's implementation, however -- which had an unfortunate tendency to be hit and miss in its recognition -- Samsung's "Turn over" feature works without hitch each and every time. We're big fans of this seemingly benign option because it combines the physical gesture of turning the sound source away from you with the software response of switching all audio off. It feels natural and can be seen as a representation of where phones may and ought to be headed, to a place where they predict and judge your intent using a higher level of intelligence than the usual impassive expectation of conventional input.
    If this helped you hit thanks.

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