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  1.    #1  
    Just ordered Delorme's Blue Logger BT GPS system. Couldn't find much about this unit but what I did find was positive. I'm wanting a very basic system that will show me where I am and where I need to go. The Delorme system seems to fit that need.

    It seems that everything is overshadowed by Tom Tom and as limited as I will use the GPS, I couldn't justify the $300 price tag. I was surprised to find the Blue Logger for $150. Is there $150 worth of difference in the two systems? Tom Tom does have the newer chipset but I couldn't find much bad written about the chipset in the Blue Logger.

    Does anyone have any experience with the Blue Logger? Those that posted positive experiences still happy with the system?
  2. #2  
    The GPS receiver works great. I have a BlueLogger. The 2005 version of Street Atlas was worthless on the handheld. There is $150 worth of difference between TomTom and StreetAtlas, just in the software. I don't know anything about the 2006 version of Street Atlas. They would have had to make a ton of differences for it to be worth it to me. In the 2005 version, it was next to impossible to create a route on the fly on the handheld. It would take over an hour in most cases to calculate. In TomTom it takes seconds. The 3D view in TomTom makes viewing on the Treo pleasant as well.

    I would be curious about the 2006 version of Street Atlas.
  3. BMAX's Avatar
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    #3  
    Please post back when you receive your bluelooger and what you think if it. I have asked my DH to get me one for xmas. I've curious how long it will take to receive and how easy the set up is.

    Becky
  4.    #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnH59
    The GPS receiver works great. I have a BlueLogger. The 2005 version of Street Atlas was worthless on the handheld.
    Curious... when you used Street Atlas, how much memory did it take up on the Treo. Trying to figure out what I will have to sacrifice to make room.
  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by coppertop
    Curious... when you used Street Atlas, how much memory did it take up on the Treo. Trying to figure out what I will have to sacrifice to make room.
    I am not positive. I think the app itself was between 700K and 1MB. I ended up running the app from the SD card using PowerRun. I did not use it much. The app was too awkward to use on the handheld. It was kay if you mapped your route on the PC and then copied the maps to the device. But to create a route on the fly was totally worthless. I would be very curious as to what you find with the 2006 version. I have been a Street Atlas user for about 5 years. The software on my laptop is great. I wish I could say the same for the Palm app.
  6.    #6  
    Just got the Blue Logger from the UPS van. The GPS unit is smaller than expected. About the size of a match box... just a tad longer. The unit is charging and I've installed the software/maps.

    First impression is that I will probably find another mapping program. I don't know if I am so use to Microsoft Streets and Trips and just need to get use to a different mapping program.

    I'll take it out for a test drive later and will let you know how the GPS unit works out.

    Just out of curiousity.... if the Street Atlas doesn't work out will the GPS unit work with TomTom?
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by coppertop
    Just got the Blue Logger from the UPS van. The GPS unit is smaller than expected. About the size of a match box... just a tad longer. The unit is charging and I've installed the software/maps.

    First impression is that I will probably find another mapping program. I don't know if I am so use to Microsoft Streets and Trips and just need to get use to a different mapping program.

    I'll take it out for a test drive later and will let you know how the GPS unit works out.

    Just out of curiousity.... if the Street Atlas doesn't work out will the GPS unit work with TomTom?
    Yes, I use the BlueLogger with TomTom and it works quite well.
  8.    #8  
    Well... I've tinkered with the Blue Logger yesterday afternoon and this morning. Here's my thoughts. Keep in mind I have no clue about chipset and the technical information. This review is simply from an end user's view.

    The Blue Logger GPS Module is small, smaller than expected. If you take a match box and open it half-way, you'll be really close to the size. It takes about five hours to fully charge and according to the literature, the battery will last about five hours. The package I purchased came with a car charger just in case. The unit has two rubber pads on the base and it stays put on the dash.

    The software is probably the weakest point of the package. The desktop application isn't too bad but I can't help but feel that the navigation could be more straight forward. I did run into several "unknown" errors when I attempted to prepare a map for sync. I tried it again and the error when away.

    There is a way to enter waypoints but I couldn't find any means to locate way points. The route planner is probably the most straight forward item on the desktop. You've got a field next to a green light (your start point entry) and a field next to a red light (your stop point) that sit above the map view. I've yet to figure out the voice prompts but haven't given up yet.

    Establishing a relationship between the Treo and the GPS unit is fairly easy. Before you try to connect in the map program, you've got to go to settings and the Treo has a unique device setting (NMEA 0183). The manual has the setting "Generic Device" but on my Treo this wasn't an available option.

    Getting the GPS to establish connection with the sattelites varied with the weather. Yesterday I had really clear skys and the link was established by the time my Treo connected with the Blue Logger. Last night, sitting by the kitchen window it took about two minutes. This morning with overcast, very cold skys it took about three minutes. I have yet to loose the signal once it was established.

    Using the GPS was interesting. The location marker was about 1/4 inch off from where I was. I attempted moving the GPS module around on my dashboard hoping that would get things back in line but it didn't. It wasn't constantly off the mark but I'de say 40% of the time the Treo would have me driving off-road. I like the "Monitor" view of the GPS which show direction of travel, speed and Long/Lat location.

    This BT GPS set-up is ideal for those looking for a basic GPS system to let you know where you are and where you need to go. Even though the locator isn't right on the mark, it's close enough not to cause problems. Again, the weakest point of the package is the map software.

    I paid $150 for my Blue Logger and for the limited use, it fits my needs. If I find myself using GPS more... I'd probably look into a differenct software package. I couldn't find many BT GPS modules under $150 and if I end up getting another software package.... I will have essentially paid for the GPS unit and gotten the software for free.

    If I ever figure out the voice prompts.... I'll add to the review.
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by coppertop
    Well... I've tinkered with the Blue Logger yesterday afternoon and this morning. Here's my thoughts. Keep in mind I have no clue about chipset and the technical information. This review is simply from an end user's view.
    I am very curious if you are now able to create a new route on the handheld. And, if so, how long does it take to calculate the route. Street Atlas for Handheld 2005 was worthless when trying to create a new route on the handheld. Thus, I purchased TomTom. Since I can get the Street Atlas upgrade fairly cheap, I would probably do so if they have resolved the mapping issues on the handheld.

    Thanks,

    John
  10.    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnH59
    I am very curious if you are now able to create a new route on the handheld. And, if so, how long does it take to calculate the route. Street Atlas for Handheld 2005 was worthless when trying to create a new route on the handheld. Thus, I purchased TomTom. Since I can get the Street Atlas upgrade fairly cheap, I would probably do so if they have resolved the mapping issues on the handheld.

    Thanks,

    John
    I was able to create a new route on the handheld and it didn't take all that long. It also has the ability (hadn't used it) to track your movements and save it as a route.
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by coppertop
    I was able to create a new route on the handheld and it didn't take all that long. It also has the ability (hadn't used it) to track your movements and save it as a route.
    Thanks, I may have to purchase the upgrade just for the fun of it.

    I have used the save a route. You set that up in the BlueLogger software. You can track based on speed, distance, etc. Once it is logged, you then open the file into Street Atlas on the desktop and it shows the route that was taken. It can even tell you the speeds that were travelled.
  12.    #12  
    It's not the easiest map program to navigate through. I still can't get any voice prompts and I don't see any means to transfer routes from the desktop to the Treo. I'm sure it's there but I have yet to find it.
  13.    #13  
    Review Update....

    It's not me... the software is really weak. It's qued a map up for installation that no longer exists and I can't find a way to stop it.

    I've removed Street Atlas from my desktop and it still wants to install the map to the SD card. I've taken the SD card out and things sync smoothly.

    I'm tempted to spend the extra bucks for the TomTom setup but I really like the GPS module.
  14. #14  
    I bought the software only version of TomTom from tigergps.com (I think) for $125.
  15.    #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnH59
    I bought the software only version of TomTom from tigergps.com (I think) for $125.
    Is the TomTom software more user friendly than the Delorme? Is it a pain to set up?
  16. #16  
    It is MUCH easier to use than the Street Atlas 2005 that I have. I had no problems installing TomTom. I have read where some have, but I really can't comment since my install went extremely smooth. I did install as much as I could to "another location" and then copied the files to my SD card. I think I installed the application to my card and then chose the "other" location for the maps. I installed them to a folder on my desktop and then copied the ones I needed to my SD card. I have travelled in Denver, Dallas, and Washington DC and it has worked flawlessly for me. The only problem I have had is right here in my home town. TomTom has tried to get me to down a one way street a few times. No problem though, I just go to the next block and TomTom recalculates the route.
  17.    #17  
    I wish TomTom had a demo. It's a big chunk of change.

    I still can't figure out how to stop the Hotsync from trying to install a map that isn't there for a program that has been deleted.
  18.    #18  
    The more I tinker, the more I learn.

    Delorme Street Atlas doesn't like transfering large map file. It appears to like smaller files (5mb or smaller) and the large ones lock up the Hot Sync.

    I cleaned up everything and found a copy of the large map file in the Palm Directory waiting to be transfered. Deleting that and limiting the size of the map file improves the performance greatly.

    Curious, for those who use TomTom... is there any size limitations on the map file?
  19. #19  
    I think I was able to not actually hotsync when I was using Street Atlas. I would go through the process with the software, but would not actually hotsync. I would find the maps in the install folder under my Palm profile and copy the map to my card. It was much faster. Still did not like the overall routing once on the handheld though.

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