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  1. mgauss's Avatar
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       #1  
    I need a GPS. Should I get a stand alone Garmin for $ 500 or should I use the Treo? I read about problems with one of the Treo GPS units.
  2. #2  
    Quote Originally Posted by mgauss
    I need a GPS. Should I get a stand alone Garmin for $ 500 or should I use the Treo? I read about problems with one of the Treo GPS units.
    Get a Garmin (I have two) or Magellen. Well, I guess maybe it depends on how you'll use it...but I'd stick to a dedicated device.
    MaxiMunK.com The Forum That Asks, "Are You Not Entertained?"

    Remember: "Anyone that thinks the Treo should just work right out of the box, shouldn't own a Treo..."
  3. #3  
    You save 250 with Treo. Sometimes you may have problem syncing the bluetooth receiver and the Treo. I usualy solve that problem by select a different receiver on TomTom menu and then swtich it back; or recharge the receiver; or just wait a couple minutes.

    Also you don't have to worry about your GPS getting stolen, which is the biggest appeal to me.
  4. #4  
    I use Mapopolis NavCard with a Belkin Bluetooth GPS. I have not had any problems with this setup. I love having all of the 48 continental states on a single 1 GB card. It routes quickly. You can actually try Mapoopolis for free (albeit with more limited maps) if you go to www.mapopolis.com.

    If you are not in the US, I'd probably go to the only other available solution for PalmOS: Tom Tom.

    I prefer to use my Treo instead of a standalone unit. I travel a lot on business and I don't like carrying around an extra unit with its attendant cables. I usually don't need nav at home so there's no sense in installing anything permanently in my home vehicle.

    I've used the Hertz Neverlost system and Mapopolis provides me all the same navigation help. I don't feel like I am compromising anything. The UI is not as fancy as some of the others, but once you get used to it, it is actually a very good program, particularly with the way it compresses and stores map data. The routes it comes up with are also very good. One thing I don't use much but hear some talk about are points of interest. I'm not sure how those compare to other systems. However, from a purely navigational point of view, the Treo solutions work pretty well.
  5. #5  
    IMO, if you already have a laptop, the el-cheapo GPS add-on hardware and software from MS (Streets and ..something) or Delorme or Rand Mcnally are hard to beat. You get a huge screen, voice commands and guides, etc.

    Obviously, this is best for use in vehicles. Not suitable for hiking (with a laptop and power source in the backpack ...)
    --
    Aloke
    Cingular GSM
    Software:Treo650-1.17-CNG
    Firmware:01.51 Hardware:A
  6. #6  
    Dude - Treo with Bluetooth GPS and Tom Tom Nav5..it rocks can't beat it, I drive through 4 countries with it from Uk to germany and it never let me down once....always on track and reliable...
  7. #7  
    Quote Originally Posted by aprasad
    IMO, if you already have a laptop, the el-cheapo GPS add-on hardware and software from MS (Streets and ..something) or Delorme or Rand Mcnally are hard to beat. You get a huge screen, voice commands and guides, etc.

    Obviously, this is best for use in vehicles. Not suitable for hiking (with a laptop and power source in the backpack ...)
    Thats exactly what I do. I plug a Garmin Venture into an old laptop of mine, running both S&T & Delorme. A 12" screen makes things easier. The only negative is having to look towards the passenger seat.

    I also plug the Venture into my Toshiba PPC mounted to the windshield. I like the "heads up" display, but not the 4" screen.
    MaxiMunK.com The Forum That Asks, "Are You Not Entertained?"

    Remember: "Anyone that thinks the Treo should just work right out of the box, shouldn't own a Treo..."
  8. #8  
    Inertion...
    you mean to tell me that you actually get out enough to use GPS? I thought TC was your home!
    I have a new found respect for you! ;-)
  9. #9  
    Although the installation was a bear, now that it is working I'm very happy with TomTom Navigator 5 on my T650. I have the TomTom bluetooth GPS which is very compact and works well. We have a dedicated nav system in one vehicle and TTNav5 compares favorably with it for car navigation, routing and POI data. I prefer having a combined unit but since you still need a separate GPS receiver, I don't know that it's that different from having a standalone GPS system. I've also loaded Outdoor Navigator on the T650 which provides for navigation on USGS maps and nautical charts. As Insertion says, it depends how you intend to use it. Overall, I like the flexibility you get with a T650 which can support several different software packages.

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