Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1.    #1  
    Ok, maybe I'm showing my PalmOS ignorance here, but oh well. Is there anything like the 'top' command on UNIX that I can use to determine what is running/using CPU? I've seen some comments about a program called 'sysinternals' but from what i've read it didn't seem to be what i was looking for.

    I am asking as my battery life is approx 12-14 hrs right now. I run chatter w/ 2 IMAP accounts and make maybe 15 minutes of calls a day (if that). Maybe that is what I should expect but it would be nice if I could look at the CPU usage.

    TIA
    Marc
  2. #2  
    The palm is a event based system, it does not use "processes" like you are thinking. System events and programs just generate notices, that everything has a chance to respond to. Say a sms comes in, it generates a event telling the system it happened. Every program installed that registered for that event gets told about it, and they each have a chance to run when that happens. There is nothing you can do about what's running other than delete it or unregister it.

    Hope this helps.

    Edit: Furthermore, chatter keeps your network connection open ALL the time, so yes, that's about what you should expect. If you want better, only check your email once or twice an hour.
  3.    #3  
    Helps greatly. Thank you for the response. Only remaining question is if Chatter keeps a TCP connection open to the IMAP server, outside of the occassional keepalive/ping type message I'm assuming IMAP IDLE connections require, why would it use so much juice on a slow day with say 10 or so emails?

    Probably a more appropriate question for the chatter forums.

    Thanks again.

    Marc
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by therf
    Helps greatly. Thank you for the response. Only remaining question is if Chatter keeps a TCP connection open to the IMAP server, outside of the occassional keepalive/ping type message I'm assuming IMAP IDLE connections require, why would it use so much juice on a slow day with say 10 or so emails?

    Probably a more appropriate question for the chatter forums.

    Thanks again.

    Marc
    Its not the number of packets that its sending that are using your battery, or even receiving the email. Its keeping the GPRS/EDGE connection alive that drains the power source.
    iPhone in the Washington DC area.

Posting Permissions