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  1.    #1  
    Hello

    I have a lot of protected WMA's on my computer and I want to store them as mp3's so that I can listen to that music everywhere I want. What is the best converter I can use to get passed this DRM protection ?
    I hope I'm in the right place to ask
  2. #2  
    Well...there's no solution to convert them to MP3s. You can use them directly with PocketTunes, though. At least that's what I hear....I use Aeroplayer, so I dunno about all the details of PTunes.
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornholio
    Hello

    I have a lot of protected WMA's on my computer and I want to store them as mp3's so that I can listen to that music everywhere I want. What is the best converter I can use to get passed this DRM protection ?
    I hope I'm in the right place to ask
    You're in the wrong place to ask.
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  4. #4  
    PTunes will allow you to listen to them on your Treo, but like you I want full FAIR USE when it comes to my music. I'd suggest burning them to a CD then doing an MP3 rip of that CD. If you don't have rights to burn them to CD you have no "legal" options outside of PTunes.
  5. #5  
    I was reading the forum and thought to give you an answer, to prove you are not in the wrong place to ask
    What I'm going to say it's not against the law in any way. It's just following the FairUse principle.
    There are several methods to do this conversion.
    One of them is a re-copression method (speaker out to mic in and record).
    Another method is burning the protected files on a CD, making an audio CD, then rip them with a software like CDex.
    But the easiest method in my opinion is to use a tool that does it all for you. I use www.tunebite.com
    It's a software that runs in the background and records the files that you play in your Windows Media Player. You can choose from a variety of re-encoding options too, thus making the quality loss almost "un-hearable"

    Your choice...
  6. aetherion's Avatar
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    #6  
    If the DRM'd song is something that you purchased (ie, for $0.99), then you can legally burn it to a CD then re-rip it. In fact, you can legally use any of the techniques that Watchem described. Yes, it's bordering on the edge of the DMCA, but Fair Use will take over in this case because you've purchased it forever.

    If the DRM'd song is part of a subscription service where you must pay a fee to make the content playable each month, then you may not legally remove the DRM from the file. You do not own the music and therefore are not allowed to burn to cd/etc...you are "borrowing" the music. While people have developed ways to break the DRM, those methods do not last long and are for very specific scenarios...by the time you find a way it will probably be "fixed" anyway. This is probably not the place to ask about illegally breaking the subscription DRM.
  7.    #7  
    I wasn't searching by any means for illegal stuff. I just wanted some "freedom" concerning the music I download.
    I like Napster for the variety of songs that it gives me, and I'm not going to to cancel my subscription once my files are converted.
    BUT if i like a bunch of songs, I really want to take them to my car, to my mp3 player, to store them where I like, in what format I want, etc.... this kind of freedom. And honestly, paying for each of them 0.99 $ it's a bit exagerated
    Btw. Watchem, thanks a lot for that tool tip. Very nice software and so easy to use
  8. #8  
    Quote Originally Posted by Cornholio
    And honestly, paying for each of them 0.99 $ it's a bit exagerated
    Are you saying you don't want to pay 99 cents to be able to burn them to CD? If that is the case then you really are breaking the law in converting them to any format outside of what the service allows.
  9. #9  
    According to the Digital Millenium Copyright Act it is a jailable offense to tell someone how to break DRM. A couple of fellows have already tested and lost that fight.
    So tread lightly folks.
  10. #10  
    On a curious side note, without getting into the laws of DRM, what's the difference between what he wants to do and taping a Law and Order episode or movie you received from cable or satellite (also a subscription service) to watch later on? Technically, you do not own anything. This was taken to court in the early eighties when VCRs came out and had the courts not decided in favor of the VCR things would surely be different now (no recordable DVDs, no TIVO) Just food for thought.
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  11. #11  
    Yea back in the early years of the VCR some grandma wanted to tape her soaps and John Ashcroft felt sorry for her. And from there he pushed for protections in that regard. With digital music the RIAA lined the politicians pockets good, got the DMCA passed into law and so if you get music from a service minus rights to burn it to a CD you don't own it and are just renting. If you get rights to burn it to a CD then you have more rights to it.

    The law does not always make perfect sense, but it's the law just the same. And given this is a luxury (music) I see no reason to even consider breaking it.

    The RIAA also tried to stop the release of the tape recorder. Lost that on similar grounds as the Betamax case.

    What you can do legally is record what comes off your PC Sound card. Which leads us back to tools like Replay Music and Replay Radio http://www.replay-video.com/index.php
  12. #12  
    I'm testing out Replay Music right now. It's very cool. It not only records the music at a decent quality, it also tags the song with the song info (artist/song/album, etc.). It's kind of expensive (about $50), but seems to work great.
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  13. #13  
    Well the improved editions of their software "Replay A/V and Replay Media Center" was supposed to have been released last month, but now they say it will be sometime this month
    http://www.replay-video.com/replay-av/

    http://www.replay-video.com/replay-mc/
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by heberman
    I'm testing out Replay Music right now. It's very cool. It not only records the music at a decent quality, it also tags the song with the song info (artist/song/album, etc.). It's kind of expensive (about $50), but seems to work great.
    When you say it tags the songs...you don't mean automagically, do you?? 'Cause that would be cool!
  15. #15  
    http://www.replay-video.com/replay-music/

    Wouldn't it be great if you could record music from online radio stations or digital music services, make individual song files automatically, and listen on your iPod, MP3 Player or CD Player? You can with Replay Music!

    Replay Music is a unique streaming music recorder that captures MP3 files from any streaming source. Every song is saved on your PC as a high quality MP3 file, automatically tagged with the artist, song title, album and genre, and perfectly separated into individual tracks. You can even burn songs directly to CDs, or copy them to your iPod or MP3 Player. Plus, it's incredibly easy to use. What a great way to discover new music!
  16.    #16  
    Well guys you don't need to pay 50 $ for a tool that is streaming radio stations. I use Station Reaper and it is free
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by darnell
    What you can do legally is record what comes off your PC Sound card. Which leads us back to tools like Replay Music and Replay Radio http://www.replay-video.com/index.php
    If this is legal, than Cornholio, or any other user like him can record the songs they play on their computer and a tool like Tunebite does exactly this, records the output of the sound card.
    It can happen that the files you are recording are protected files and the result will not be protected anymore, but as you said this is not illegal.
    So such a tool can be used, as I previously said, without being concerned that you break the law.
    Cause if such a tool would not be legal, the RIAA would have shut it down already.
  18. #18  
    Total Recoder is another application, using a virtual sound card and a Windows Media Player plugin you can "rip" DRM WMA's over to MP3 with id3tags and everything. Of course, it's a 1:1 conversion with respect to time, so 45 minutes of DRM'd WMA's will take 45 minutes to rip to MP3.
  19. #19  
    Cool Watchem. My mistake. I guess we're all legal here .
  20. #20  
    Quote Originally Posted by darnell
    Ahhh...it gets the tagging info from the stream. I was confusing radio stations with recording in-line audio. I thought it could copy a protected WMA or AAC file with the song info....now THAT would be cool.

    But, because of this auto-tagging, I'm definitely going to be checking replay-music out soon!!

    Now I understand why you brag about this app so much, Darnell.
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