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  1.    #1  
    Centercode is excited to offer a fantastic test opportunity for owners of wireless handsets who want complete connectivity to their Outlook Mailbox.

    This innovative software allows real time mail and scheduling through your Outlook client to your handheld. Get your mail as it arrives no matter where you are! Make appointments and manage your contacts while on the road!

    Required Qualifications
    - Must have a PC running Windows XP or Windows 2000 Pro on the company network. To avoid service interruptions the PC should remain powered on.
    - User must have local admin rights on the PC in order to install software.
    - Outlook 2000, 2002 or Outlook 2003 installed.
    - Must run Microsoft Exchange Server in the company.
    - Active data plan through wireless carrier.

    One of the following handhelds:
    - Treo (600 or 650)
    - Pocket PC (Dell Axim X50, HP iPAQ 6300, Samsung i700, Siemens SX66, Sprint PPC-6601, Symbol MC50, T-Mobile Pocket PC, Verizon Audiovox XV6600)
    - Windows Smartphone (Audiovox SMT5600, Motorola MPx220)

    Please follow this link to apply for the project:

    https://connect.centercode.com/callo...ml?callid=1566

    Feel free to contact me if you have any questions:

    Mike Fine
    mike@centercode.com
    AIM: MichaelRFine

    This is a legitimate beta test opportunity. It is for Treo 600 or 650 Users and is starting soon. This is not a spam message. I am posting here to find qualified candidates for this beta test.
  2. #2  
    Seems like a good thing .....................but the process to get the beta is WAY too long and some of the questions are not needed to test this software.

    Seems like a info gathering source to me????
  3. #3  
    Count me in.
  4. #4  
    It's not just info gathering, it's a genuine beta test. The questionnaire is just to understand the environment you'll be testing in. Give it a try, I think you'll like it...
  5. #5  
    Has anyone been accepted into the beta yet?
  6. #6  
    I applied but havent received a response.
  7. #7  
    This just sounds like another desktop re-director if you have to lave your company computer on....

    Not sure what the point is.
  8. #8  
    I have not heard back yet. However if it is a re-director I probably will not participate. I would rather see Nexchange work out all of its bugs.
  9. #9  
    That's what it sounds like to me, if I want that I'll just use the Wireless Sync software that Verizon has and isn't in Beta
  10. #10  
    Whatever it is, it sounds interesting!
  11. #11  
    I received a reply that I was accepted. however I havn't replied yet.
  12. #12  
    Well I guess this is where our discussion ends...as whoever gets accepted has to sign an NDA...
  13. #13  
    Seems like nothing more than a redirector, with some odd user-right requirements:
    - Must have a PC running Windows XP or Windows 2000 Pro on the company network. To avoid service interruptions the PC should remain powered on.
    - User must have local admin rights on the PC in order to install software.


    I wonder what keys are written to HKLM, or what specific API's/Sockets are tapped that require administrative rights.
  14. #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by evilghost
    Seems like nothing more than a redirector, with some odd user-right requirements:
    - Must have a PC running Windows XP or Windows 2000 Pro on the company network. To avoid service interruptions the PC should remain powered on.
    - User must have local admin rights on the PC in order to install software.


    I wonder what keys are written to HKLM, or what specific API's/Sockets are tapped that require administrative rights.
    Just about every software writes something to HKLM these days. When I was working for a handheld software company, we ran into quite a few problems that resulted from not being able to create and assign full control of all of our reg keys on the users PC on installation. It is not a big deal, you just need a script or installer to run msiexec as an admin on the machine(s) in order to accomplish the permissions. Most IT departments have no problem giving this permission for install only as long as they know what it is for. But it is better to have the requirements outlined up front to avoid a big firedrill and headache.

    -Rory
  15. #15  
    Well, I struggle to know what specific values need to be written to HKLM that can't as easily be done using HKCU. I find it odd that a specific application requires administrative rights, or full control over a machine for something as simple as an email redirection sub-system. HKLM is a sledge-hammer approach to Win32 programming. And just because the aggregate population of malware and shovelware writes to HKLM doesn't make it right

    Note, I'm not flaming you or trying to be a ****.
  16. #16  
    I bet it creates an NT Service, hence the 2000/XP requirement, which explains the necessity to write to HKLM....I've spent too much time in Linux; a real OS.
  17. #17  
    What the world doesn't need more of is redirector-based email software.

    Marc
  18. #18  
    Quote Originally Posted by evilghost
    Well, I struggle to know what specific values need to be written to HKLM that can't as easily be done using HKCU. I find it odd that a specific application requires administrative rights, or full control over a machine for something as simple as an email redirection sub-system.
    I would guess the privelages are only for setting specific file and registry permissions on install. What if a machine is used by multiple folks for the same purpose? The full control permissions to the registry key and file tree are probably at the software level (HKLM\Software\<Whoever Wrote the Software> and C:\Program Files\<Whoever Wrote the Software) and I would hope no where else.

    Quote Originally Posted by evilghost
    HKLM is a sledge-hammer approach to Win32 programming. And just because the aggregate population of malware and shovelware writes to HKLM doesn't make it right
    Correct, but it is a common practice these days (whether right or wrong) and many enterprise software programs use this methodology. Not saying it is the best way, but if you can't beat 'em, join 'em.

    Quote Originally Posted by evilghost
    Note, I'm not flaming you or trying to be a ****.
    I am flaming you and trying to be a ****!! Ha Ha, just kidding. No offense taken and I hope the same goes for you

    All the best,
    Rory
  19. #19  
    I think that we might be surprised if we actually knew what the beta was....what it did....who it was from, etc. ;-)
  20. #20  
    Has anyone started this yet?
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