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  1.    #1  
    I really hate how so much of electronics these days are "cold soldered". For the uninitiated, this means that they use substandard solder joints made (IIRC) with pressure and not temperature.

    Well... anyways, I found an adaptor at the local radio shack (before it turned into a "Source) ... but it sticks out a lot. I caution people against getting these. You really want the elbow kind --- this one that sticks out straight makes it far too easy to put too much torque on the little jack.

    But I did anyways. And the solder joint broke. The symptom was that it felt loose and the sound was crappy unless the jack was pushed in the "right" way.

    Not being completely helpless, I used this as an excuse to buy that new butane soldering iron at Lee Valley. Great Tool!, BTW. AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK, $modern$ $electronics$ $often$ $require$ $a$ $non$ $AC$ $soldering$ $iron$ ... $and$ $I$ $didn$'$t$ $want$ $to$ $chance$ $it$. $Besides$, $someone$ $had$ &$quot$;$borrowed$&$quot$; $my$ $old$ $AC$ $iron$ $and$ $hadn$'$t$ $returned$ $it$. $Perfect$ $excuse$.

    The foot of the jack had come loose. One quick jab and it was nailed back down. I touched the other feet in quick succession and melted some of the top where it was cracked for good measure.

    Great fix!

    But... just in case it breaks further, does anyone know a supplier of compatible jacks that I can replace it with?
  2. #2  
    Why do modern electronics require a non-AC soldering iron? I've used my AC iron on everything from XBoxes to CPUs, to TI calculators. What's the rationale behind using a butane heated iron versus one connected by AC? AC inductance? I don't solder devices that are on and have power....
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by evilghost
    I don't solder devices that are on and have power....
    Umm, I would sure hope not...
    Using my treo 650 for business:
    DesignExtend.com
  4.    #4  
    Well... my "fear" dates back to university days. I seem to remember CMOS devices being "fried" by AC irons.

    But... I suppose in reality, it's just another excuse to buy this cool (hot?) butane iron.
  5. #5  
    I can't argue with the coolness factor. I guess it's the same "fear" of using magnetic screwdrivers in computers, as if the magnetic field will destroy components and magnetically shielded disk drives. I thought for sure you wanted to get one of those "ColdHeat" soldering irons ;P
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by ZBeeble
    I really hate how so much of electronics these days are "cold soldered". For the uninitiated, this means that they use substandard solder joints made (IIRC) with pressure and not temperature.

    Well... anyways, I found an adaptor at the local radio shack (before it turned into a "Source) ... but it sticks out a lot. I caution people against getting these. You really want the elbow kind --- this one that sticks out straight makes it far too easy to put too much torque on the little jack.

    But I did anyways. And the solder joint broke. The symptom was that it felt loose and the sound was crappy unless the jack was pushed in the "right" way.

    Not being completely helpless, I used this as an excuse to buy that new butane soldering iron at Lee Valley. Great Tool!, BTW. AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK, $modern$ $electronics$ $often$ $require$ $a$ $non$ $AC$ $soldering$ $iron$ ... $and$ $I$ $didn$'$t$ $want$ $to$ $chance$ $it$. $Besides$, $someone$ $had$ &$quot$;$borrowed$&$quot$; $my$ $old$ $AC$ $iron$ $and$ $hadn$'$t$ $returned$ $it$. $Perfect$ $excuse$.

    The foot of the jack had come loose. One quick jab and it was nailed back down. I touched the other feet in quick succession and melted some of the top where it was cracked for good measure.

    Great fix!

    But... just in case it breaks further, does anyone know a supplier of compatible jacks that I can replace it with?
    right above your post on this page is link to a neadphone adapter that treocentral sells. are you talking about something different?
    Sprint Treo 700p, Sony UX/TX, u720,
    Edirol R-09, Mitsu PK 20, Mimio
  7.    #7  
    Yes I am. I realize that I should obtain a new adaptor to reduce the likelyhood of damage, however, I'm asking if someone knows the source of the jack --- the jack is inside the Treo. Should this one break further, it may not be repairable.

    While I suppose I could buy any old jack of the appropriate size (a jack of larger dimension may even fit), there is little room to adapt the connections ... so the exact fit part would be preferable. I'm supposing that some electronics parts supplier or other will actually be carrying this part ... since it seems unlikely palmone's manufacturer would have fabbed their own version of a common part.
  8. #8  
    Do you have any pictures of how you went through this procedure? Given how people, including me, have seen their jack fail I am expecting that the day after my warranty is over the jack on my phone will need to be replaced.

    Keep searching for a source for the replacement connector because many of us might need one some day.
    Pilot 5K->Palm IIIc->Tungsten T/T2->Treo 650/680 -> Pre+ (1.4.5 & Uberkernel)
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by ZBeeble
    I really hate how so much of electronics these days are "cold soldered". For the uninitiated, this means that they use substandard solder joints made (IIRC) with pressure and not temperature.

    Well... anyways, I found an adaptor at the local radio shack (before it turned into a "Source) ... but it sticks out a lot. I caution people against getting these. You really want the elbow kind --- this one that sticks out straight makes it far too easy to put too much torque on the little jack.

    But I did anyways. And the solder joint broke. The symptom was that it felt loose and the sound was crappy unless the jack was pushed in the "right" way.

    Not being completely helpless, I used this as an excuse to buy that new butane soldering iron at Lee Valley. Great Tool!, BTW. AFAIKAFAIKAFAIK, $modern$ $electronics$ $often$ $require$ $a$ $non$ $AC$ $soldering$ $iron$ ... $and$ $I$ $didn$'$t$ $want$ $to$ $chance$ $it$. $Besides$, $someone$ $had$ &$quot$;$borrowed$&$quot$; $my$ $old$ $AC$ $iron$ $and$ $hadn$'$t$ $returned$ $it$. $Perfect$ $excuse$.

    The foot of the jack had come loose. One quick jab and it was nailed back down. I touched the other feet in quick succession and melted some of the top where it was cracked for good measure.

    Great fix!

    But... just in case it breaks further, does anyone know a supplier of compatible jacks that I can replace it with?

    After I got my Treo in December I purchased the Radio Shack Audio jack to listen to music. Within a month the adapter broke trapping the bottom 2 mm in the bottom of the Treo headphone jack. I took it back to the store after calling corporate and the store manager argued with me telling me it was operator error and not a design flaw. Sure, you can break the bottom tip of the adapter off if it is in the bottom of the female connector. After a couple threats to their risk management division, I had to get my Treo replaced under warranty due to a hardware failure and just let it go. Needless to say I bought the palm adapter after that. YMMV.
  10.    #10  
    Well... I didn't take pictures. I do have a digital camera other than the treo, but I don't think of using it as often. Heh.

    Let's see. The treo isn't that hard to take apart. If you can't get around that, you might want to stop there. There is a screw under a rubber stopper with a sticker on it. All the screws worked iwth my #6 torx, but a #5 might be better. The screw under the rubber stopper holds in the ariel stub, has the sticker, and is longer than the others.

    The headphone jack has six solder connections --- probably just three, but doubled for mechanical strength. In my case, one of the outboard most connections had come loose. All six look like they're cold soldered. The outboard connections appeared to have too little solder. The jack itself was also cracked.

    The outboard connections also hold a strap over the outboard end of the jack. Tacking down the outboard connections also secure the strap and the jack no longer feels loose.

    I didn't follow the warrenty route because I can't do without my phone --- and I didn't have a good experience last time I phoned Rogers about this phone.

    As to the last comment, I noticed that the radio shack jack's center pin is weak, easily bent, and I believe it could sheer off. I don't know how you'd remove it. Maybe drilling the base of the jack ... maybe a small strong magnet.
  11. #11  
    Thanks for the tip on soldering the jack - I actually HAVE the radio shack jack and torqued my 650 accidentally and it broke as well. I called cingular and had them replace it under warranty. I will be buying the other adapter soon.

    j
  12. #12  
    I went ahead and decided to follow the top posters procedure. I've gone thru 2 treos both of which ended up with one of these "broken" 2.5mm jacks. Well after about an hour of work my jack is broken no more. While nothing was cracked, one of the 6 feet was not soldered down properly. A quick jab with my soldering iron and I can finally hear the left channel without having to apply pressure to the jack. I sure as hell hope Palm fixes this issue in future hardware revisions.
  13. iramike's Avatar
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    #13  
    I got the Radio Shack adaptor as well, I am just using it in my car, it sits on the seat beside me. Where is everyone else using their adaptor. I only use it for listening to podcasts while I am driving to work. I am just wondering if I should worry about my jack being broken?
  14.    #14  
    I broke mine while stooping to scoop ... while walking the dog. I've got another adaptor on order --- but I'm still using the radio crap adaptor in the truck. It makes me nervous to use it.
  15. #15  
    I think I broke my jack in a different way. My phone no longer works except when I have my wired headset plugged in. In every other respect, the phone works, so I think that the problem is that the phone thinks there is a headset plugged in even when there isn't. I'm not sure tacking down the jack at the pins is the solution, I suspect I need to replace the jack.

    ZBeeble, when you got the top off, can you see inside the jack to see if anything is shorting or is it all encased in plastic and unfixable. If so, I _really_ need to find a source for these jacks.

    So all I need is a #5 or 6 Torx and I can it it open??
  16. #16  
    To answer my own question, Yes!. I bought a #5 Torx screwdriver and it fit perfectly. I dissasembled the Treo and found that the audio jack connections were OK. Still I suspected my problem was that the phone was thinking something was plugged into the audio jack even when it wasn't. On the top of the jack there is a part of a conductor exposed. It is bent metal of you look really closely. I jammed a tiny screwdriver in on one side of it and tweaked it a bit. This completely fixed my phone!! The only problem is now I really don't want to ever risk using the headphone jack again. I really need to replace the headphone jack entirely. Which brings me back to the first post of this thread... Does anyone know where we can get replacement head phone jacks for the Treo 650? Does anyone even know the part number or manufacturer?

    I _really_ wish the phone had stereo bluetooth capability, then we wouldn't need to deal with this issue.

    In the mean time, so much for the Treo as an MP3 player.
  17. maitre's Avatar
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    #17  
    I too bought the radio shack jack and noticed the torque problem. For $7.99 you can buy Ziplinq earbuds with a 2.5mm elbo jack! Audiophiles might not think that the sound quality is supreme, but, hey, it works and is reasonably priced! I bought my first Ziplinq's at Fry's Electronics. Now I have two on order from Amazon.
  18.    #18  
    Someone recently re-referenced this topic. I have not yet found a source of 2.5 mm jacks, but have put on my list to visit electrosonics (here in Toronto) on my next trip into the city.
  19. #19  
    Is it possible to replace the jack with a 3.5mm jack and forgo the headphone adapter?
  20.    #20  
    Heh. There's not a lot of space in there. You'd probably have to buy a bunch and see. The soldering isn't an issue --- fairly easy. The placement of the contacts on the circuit board and the physical space allocated to the jack is. There is not much wasted space in this little 2.5mm jack. The outside dimensions are likely only 2.7mm or maybe 3.0mm (square). I believe 3.5mm jacks are also longer.
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