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  1.    #1  
    Is there an application which can provide a list of the background running applications?
  2. #2  
    Good Question!

    Anybody?


    Later Edit: I have FileZ. If I view internal files and check the ROM box -- I get a whole new list of additional items with a ROM icon -- would these be the files "open" in memory?


    (FileZ is a freeware program from www.nosleep.net)
    Last edited by gtwo; 06/01/2005 at 11:35 AM.
  3. #3  
    ROM are the files in actual ROM, while those displayed in "Internal Files" are the items in RAM.

    Make sense? The checkbox allows you to filter our ROM programs (IE, show only those in RAM), or to display the ROM programs.
  4. #4  
    Thanks Evilghost!!
  5.    #5  
    There has to be some way of listing application such as KeyCaps, kblights, verichat, chatteremail, etc...applications that are running in the "background".
  6. #6  
    Do you have Filez? Are they listed with the ROM icon? Of course FileZ lists every file -- not just the parent program. . . . and you have all the other non-rom files cluttering up the listing. . . .
  7. #7  
    Yes, I would love to find out an application that would do this (like "Task Manager" in Windoze). My Treo 650 if running pretty slowly lately, so it would be nice to try and track down the culprit...
  8. #8  
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by evilghost
    Yes, the Palm doesn't multithread (run apps in the background technically), but some apps must do something like that - what about Chattermail, for example? Or Butler? Aren't those continually running (which may slow down a system)?
  10. #10  
    They do it either by registering for a published event, or setting a timer that "sub-launches" the app with the parameter set that tells it that it's timer has fired. An app can do limited things in this mode.

    No background apps are ever running in the background all the time - only part of their code runs long enough to handle the events or timers.

    Quote Originally Posted by tcc
    Yes, the Palm doesn't multithread (run apps in the background technically), but some apps must do something like that - what about Chattermail, for example? Or Butler? Aren't those continually running (which may slow down a system)?
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by rlwhitt
    They do it either by registering for a published event, or setting a timer that "sub-launches" the app with the parameter set that tells it that it's timer has fired. An app can do limited things in this mode.

    No background apps are ever running in the background all the time - only part of their code runs long enough to handle the events or timers.
    How does Ptunes play mp3's in the background while other applications are running as well?

    Curious ...
    --
    Aloke
    Cingular GSM
    Software:Treo650-1.17-CNG
    Firmware:01.51 Hardware:A
  12. #12  
    Good question. The answer is somewhat the same. A player fetches the song file and gives the first part of it to the Sound Manager and in essense says play this, and let me know when you need more. The sound manager will execute a callback function within the player when it needs another buffer of sound data, whether the player is the currently executing app or not. So it APPEARS to be running in the background, but is really not.

    Quote Originally Posted by aprasad
    How does Ptunes play mp3's in the background while other applications are running as well?

    Curious ...
  13. #13  
    I am not a programmer. There.. now I can say anything stupid :-)

    What you describe sounds like the event-driven multitasking .. sort of like what even non-pre-emptive multitasking desktop software used to do (DOS .. Windows 3.1?).

    At a basic level, even pentiums execute one application at a time.
    --
    Aloke
    Cingular GSM
    Software:Treo650-1.17-CNG
    Firmware:01.51 Hardware:A
  14. #14  
    It is indeed. The OS Kernel *IS* multitasking, at least in a primative way. Otherwise all this would not be possible. But they drew the line at allowing entire apps to start and be left executing their event loops, or starting new threads of execution. That will come in Cobalt or whatever (if anything) comes next. Now all you can do is request the OS to alert some part of your code to respond to certain events and do limited processing there.

    Quote Originally Posted by aprasad
    I am not a programmer. There.. now I can say anything stupid :-)

    What you describe sounds like the event-driven multitasking .. sort of like what even non-pre-emptive multitasking desktop software used to do (DOS .. Windows 3.1?).

    At a basic level, even pentiums execute one application at a time.

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