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  1.    #1  
    might it be time for a chatter product that provides less nuts and bolts access for the growing class of non-techy, smartphone consumer?...

    in the past two weeks i've had two friends purchase treo 650 phones based on their appreciation of and fascination with my 600 AND chatter email...

    i should say that i am a huge fan of the "blackberry killer" aspect of chatter...and also add that i'm a bit of a tech-counselor for my friends and family (like most of you, i'm sure) and once i get behind a product or service i push it to everyone i know who could benefit from it...

    i believe my two friends and their recent purchases represent a growing class of smartphone owners...these are people who are attracted to the technology and it's abilities..."a phone with a keyboard, perfect!"..."email that comes without downloading it, awesome!"..."i can put my outlook stuff in there? sweet!"...

    now...these people don't care about, .prc files, feature requests, smtp logins...they don't really want to know what imap is if they don't have to...i know these things are no big deal to most of us...but it's important to understand that this growing class of users are REALLY one-dimensional in their purchase and use of these devices...

    so, on two different phones, for two different friends in two weeks i've been their chatter email support representative...installing the trial versions, schooling them a bit along the way, explaining imap and alerts and q'syncs and nudges...the whole time thinking about when i first bought my blackberry from t-mobile...it was completely turn-key...you logged on initially, set up your tmail user id and password then told it what pop accounts you wanted it to query...and away you went...sweet...

    for example...the vast majority of people don't give a rat's *** as to how many nudges their aol mail gets or selecting a pop up alert for their comcast mail or whatever...to the lay person it's a utility, a faucet or a light switch...on or off...do i have mail or do i not f#*king have mail...

    MARC...i offer this...let's consider for a moment that chatter email in it's current state (stable and beta versions) is PRO-SUMER...right?...it takes a little bit of techno-geek gumption to get it workin' and to stick with it...which is cool because the geek involvment from all of us has contributed to the value of the product...

    might it be time for a chatter product that provides less nuts and bolts access for the growing class of non-techy, smartphone consumer?...

    this would be stripped down to a lean feature set...this would involve a partneship with fastmail and a turn key set up page...this would involve a "wizard" type set-up routine for account set-up within chatter...and, deservedly so, this would involve a premium price tag...i imagine something in the $49.95 price point that would include the fastmail membership...

    this product would have it's own website...there would be a clear distinction between the ongoing and forum-driven development of the "pro-sumer" chatter email product and this new turn-key, stripped down product...

    i hope this is something worth considering...thanks for an amazing product marc...

    detroitkruk
  2. #2  
    Hi...

    Yes, I think this is a very good idea, and I'm actually moving that way with a few test cases (bundled treo/chatter/email host or just chatter/email host). I haven't discussed it with fastmail, actually; these are different folks.

    I'm also thinking of a simple vs. advanced preferences system that hides 80% of the preferences (similar to what you mention).

    Marc
  3. #3  
    Having just done a "virgin" setup on my new Verizon 650, I'll chime in: I don't think there's a need to strip down the product, but it needs a friendlier face. Rarely-used options are right up front, while, for example, the all-important SMTP server setup is hidden away under "Other". Also, most people think of their email address as just that...not their "return address".
    A good "wizard" would start by asking for the email address, and then it would make some good assumptions for well-known domains such as AOL or Yahoo. The Mail application on Mac OS X Tiger is a wonderful teacher about how to do this.
  4. #4  
    Thanks, tangible. That's the way I'm moving...

    Marc

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