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  1. #21  
    Too bad folks are still using filesystems that fragment quickly/easily. As for me and my house, we run ext3 on Linux.
    Last edited by evilghost; 07/27/2005 at 10:00 AM.
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by AnteL0pe
    Next time run some benchmarks, there isnt much difference. The time spent doing the defragging will never be recouped by the performance gain.
    Well then i am never running defrag again...
  3. #23  
    Quote Originally Posted by ToroA
    Well then i am never running defrag again...
    Run some benchmarks next time before you defrag thats all im saying.....
  4. #24  
    Quote Originally Posted by AnteL0pe
    Run some benchmarks next time before you defrag thats all im saying.....
    Well if you follow your theory there you would never want to defrag your system. So since that is my new goal I will let you know the gain of not only time lost as a result of a sluggish system but the cost of a new HDD when it crashes and the loss of data and time to reload a system from scratch.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by ToroA
    Well if you follow your theory there you would never want to defrag your system. So since that is my new goal I will let you know the gain of not only time lost as a result of a sluggish system but the cost of a new HDD when it crashes and the loss of data and time to reload a system from scratch.
    I assume youre running windows, but what on earth are you doing with your machine that you are causing this much fragmentation? If you run some actual benchmarks, either from a benchmarking app or just do some disk intensive tasks and time them, you will see if defragging actually speeds up your system. What I have found is that in reality it doesnt significantly improve performance. If youre right the numbers will show that and you will have proved me wrong, so be it. Oh, and btw, there is no way fragmentation is going to cause a drive to fail.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by ToroA
    Well if you follow your theory there you would never want to defrag your system. So since that is my new goal I will let you know the gain of not only time lost as a result of a sluggish system but the cost of a new HDD when it crashes and the loss of data and time to reload a system from scratch.
    Why would excessive fragmentation cause drive failure? I'm with you on everything else but this one statement. I've never seen a drive fail as a result of excessive head-movement, but rather, the onboard controller goes bad or the spindle-motor burns up. Head movement is controlled by a magnetic aperature anways.

    A heavily fragmented disk does reduce performance. File fragmentation is a performance leech. Defragmenting fragmented filesystems is a good idea. If you don't let the system get heavily fragmented then the defragmention time is quite quick.
    Last edited by evilghost; 07/27/2005 at 11:06 AM.
  7. #27  
    Quote Originally Posted by evilghost
    Why would excessive fragmentation cause drive failure? I'm with you on everything else but this one statement. I've never seen a drive fail as a result of excessive head-movement, but rather, the onboard controller goes bad or the spindle-motor burns up. Head movement is controlled by a magnetic aperature anways.

    A heavily fragmented disk does reduce performance. File fragmentation is a performance leech. Defragmenting fragmented filesystems is a good idea. If you don't let the system get heavily fragmented then the defragmention time is quite quick.
    Your right the fragmentation of the HDD will not ruin it, I said it wrong. I should have said, because the fragmentation and the excessive head movement that follows the buildup of heat will cause the components of the hdd to fail. I have seen a lot of this in the portables I work with. There have been many times where heat caused by this has made hdds unstable and sectors will begin to go bad.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by AnteL0pe
    I assume youre running windows, but what on earth are you doing with your machine that you are causing this much fragmentation? If you run some actual benchmarks, either from a benchmarking app or just do some disk intensive tasks and time them, you will see if defragging actually speeds up your system. What I have found is that in reality it doesnt significantly improve performance. If youre right the numbers will show that and you will have proved me wrong, so be it. Oh, and btw, there is no way fragmentation is going to cause a drive to fail.

    Fragmentation will occur from anything. Even at my workstation I only email surf and compose documents, it becomes fragmented all the time. Let say you P2P or download large files all the time and never defrag since you have received your machine. This will only fragment the HDD even faster. Fragmentation occurs no matter what in windows itís just a matter of what you are doing to see how quickly the fragmentation and system slowdown occurs.
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