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  1.    #1  
    Does anyone have a recommendation for the best vehicle maintenance software for my needs.

    Most of the software I find is good only for tracking gas mileage and past mantenance. I really don't care about gas mileage tracking or past maintenance but really want to have reminders of upcoming maintenance needs.

    I am always forgeting to have the oil changed regularly and I can't count the tires I've ruined because I forget to have them rotated.

    Unfortunately those types of service are mileage dependant so I would have to keep odometer logs. Even though I don't care to track gas mileage, I wouldn't mind entering the current odometer reading at every fill up if that information could trigger an alarm on my palm that a maintenance need is due.

    Does anyone know of any palm software that will do that? I would really appreciate any recommendations.

    Mandy
  2. #2  
    Try AutoBuddy. It's freeware, and I think it does what you are trying to accomplish. I use it and it's great. http://palmgear.com/index.cfm?fuseac...1&prodID=58904
  3. #3  
    What you basically need is a database program. HandyShopper has been used for this as well as a gazillion other database uses.

    Here's a sampling from the readme file:

    Aromatherapy - submitted by Claire Appleby - I use HandyShopper to record different blends of aromatherapy oils for different uses. My items are individual oils and I use the stores to represent different uses such as relaxation, alertness, fatigue, headache etc. I have the database set to record per-store prices and aisles, and I use the aisles to record the number of drops of each oil needed when making up a blend for a particular purpose. This means when I select a particular use from the stores list, HandyShopper shows which oils I need with the number of drops for each oil.

    Book List - submitted by Craig Lawson - I mix together books that I want to buy with those I want to check out from a library. If I discover someone has checked out the book from the library, I make note of the call number so I can quickly locate it again either there or at another library. [editor's note: and the Custom Text field is great for storing the author's name, too!]

    Collections - submitted by Gretchen Cawthon - HandyShopper is excellent for keeping track of collections. Use the quantity field to keep track of amounts, and the price field for current values. Also, the 'stores' and 'category' fields are great for easy sorting.

    Furniture Shopping - submitted Janet Hilsmier - We loaded Rooms into the Categories. It was much easier to walk around the store, plug in each table, couch or chair that we liked, the dimensions and the price. When we finally decided which ones we "needed", it was easier to make sure the sales agent charged us correctly. Later, we added our downpayment and interim payments as negative numbers, so that we knew what was owed by final delivery.

    Gift Idea/Shopping List - submitted by Gretchen Cawthon - Set up your categories as to the type of gift (Christmas, Birthday, Baby Shower). Use the person's name in the 'store' field. As your friends and family hint at what they want for their special occasion, add it to the list and then check it off as you purchase it. I also input the price so I can add up what I have spent for each person. It is also great to have that list handy when you can't find an item they ask for at Christmas. Then after Christmas you can use the list for potential birthday gifts, just change the category for the item.

    Home Chores List - submitted by Janet Hilsmier - We loaded all of the mundane dusting, mopping, vacuuming tasks and rooms, plus the semi-annual and annual tasks like changing batteries. This most closely matches your need as it is basically a "Car Chores List"

    Home Improvement Projects - Each month of the year is a store. Categories included "Indoor", "Outdoor" and "Painting". Then, each project was loaded. We assigned the projects to months to help us schedule everything we want to do, within reason. (It is impossible to paint, till, stain, mulch, build and plant in one weekend!) It also helps us to keep focused on getting to some of those "someday I'd like..." projects.

    Impulse Purchases - submitted by Chris Antos - If you find yourself buying things you later realize you don't need, try this. Create a dated list called "Impulse", and make the Price and Date columns visible. Whenever you see something new you want to buy, add it to the Impulse list and mark down how much it costs and when you saw it. Then walk away and don't buy the item - wait about 3 weeks. Every few weeks, look through your Impulse list and see if you still really think you need the items. If you still think those $199 fold-up sunglasses will make a significant difference in your life, then by all means go back and buy them. <wink> This technique has saved me more than $1000 over the past year. Another great thing about the Impulse list is you can actually see how much money you've prevented yourself from wasting.

    Inventory - submitted by Chris Antos - HandyShopper is NOT designed for inventory! Inventory and Shopping are opposite concepts. Extremely simple inventories can be done with HandyShopper, but in general HandyShopper does not work well for inventory. Several inventory programs do exist for the Palm devices, so I recommend searching web sites to find them.

    Karate Training - submitted by Philip Wright - After three years of training, I reached the higher ranks at my karate school. But I still didn't have a good way to keep track of all my combat techniques. HandyShopper solved that problem. I created a checklist, and assigned the karate session (Jan-Feb, Mar-Apr, etc.) to the Stores field, and the level (Beginning, Intermediate, Advanced) to the Categories field. Now all I have to do is put the title of each technique in the task list, and put the instructions for each technique in the Notes field of the tasks. Now it only takes me two seconds to find a technique, and one tap of the stylus to see the complete directions for the technique. And one of the coolest things is that when I'm preparing to test for my next belt, I can check off each technique as I master it, so that I know which ones I still need to practice.

    Movies - submitted by Chris Antos - When you see a trailer for a movie you'd like to see, add it to your Movies database, along with the its upcoming release date. You can use the categories for "Theater", "Rent", "Buy VHS", "Buy DVD", etc. Attach a note to the item, with a description of the movie, in case you forget what the movie's about or who's playing in it.

    Orders - submitted by Gilly Rosenthol - When I order something, I record the item and the date ordered. That way I can keep track of what packages I'm expecting and see how long it's been.

    Packing List - submitted by Gretchen Cawthon - This one is obvious but can be fun to experiment with. I set mine up with categories first (clothing, toiletries, food, accessories, etc.) Then I put everyone in my family in the 'stores' field. As I added the items to pack, I assigned them to the proper person. For example, my husband and I both wear contacts, so I assigned 'contacts' to both of us. For items like socks and shoes, I assigned them to everyone. Now, if only my husband will be traveling, I change the store to his name and he then has a customized list of things he needs to pack.

    Project task lists - submitted by Claire Appleby - As a freelance lecturer, a lot of my work involves going through a specific sequence of tasks in relation to a particular project. For example, if I'm planning a new course for a particular college I have certain tasks such as planning the overall content, then planning the individual sessions, delivering each session, marking assignments and so on. I use a store for each project. The items are the tasks. I use the aisle number to record the sequence that the tasks have to be carried out in, and I sort the database by aisle. I use price to record the number of hours that each task usually takes, and quantity to record the number of times it has to be repeated (for example, assignments might take half an hour each to mark, but I might have 60 of them). At the start of each project, I can go through and select the tasks I need (usually all of them, but not always). I can also enter the number of assignments etc where relevant. I can then use the Total command, and HandyShopper tells me the total hours needed to complete the project, and how many hours work I have done so far.

    Reading List with Calculated Priorities - submitted by Claire Appleby - I read somewhere that if you have to get through an awful lot of reading, you can prioritise this as follows. You estimate the importance of the article or book by deciding how much you would be prepared to pay to read it. However, if you would pay the same to read a 20-page paper and a 200-page book, then your time is better spent reading the paper. So you calculate your priorities by dividing the price your willing to pay by the length of the book or paper.

    HandyShopper does this very nicely as follows. The items are the books or articles. I use quantity to record the number of pages and aisle to record how much I would pay (in GBP) to read the book. The built-in calculator is invaluable for calculating value (aisle) divided by length (quantity), and I use the price column to store this value. The list is sorted in descending order on price so that the highest priority item comes out on top. I use the categories to distinguish between reading for work and for pleasure, and I use the stores to record books I've finished reading and books I've started but not finished (because I tend to have several things on the go at the same time).

    Recipe Database - submitted by Gretchen Cawthon - This is extremely easy to build. Use the 'stores' list to create categories, such as meat dishes, pastas, seafood, sauces, appetizers, etc. Then use the actual categories function to make a more detailed sort - like crockpot, holiday, favorites, etc. Add the title of the recipe in the description field and attach a note with the recipe instructions. This is quite handy for keeping track of recipes found on the net (copy/paste from memopad) and also helpful for jotting down recipes on the go.

    Remodelling a House - submitted by Maria Popoli - I'm using it to remodel our house!! The categories are rooms, exterior elements, substructures. The stores are subcontractors, our own elbow grease, or particular stores for required purchases. We redecorated our son's room in a weekend because we had everything ready to go like a kit - no trips to the hardware store. I've got another database for the landscaping, categories are: nursery for purchases, existing design, gardening chores pending, failures, and growers. Stores are locations within my yard. No wasted money at the nursery and a beautiful garden.

    Restaurants - submitted by David Jacobs - I have created a restaurant list using the "Stores" filed for "Style" of food (Asian, Vegetarian, Seafood, etc). This allows restaurants to be categorised by multiple "Styles". The categories field could be used to denote locations and the priority field for quality rating. The price field could be used to give an average cost for a meal.

    Software List - submitted by Rosemary Lewis - Under categories, I use Accessories - Software. Under Stores, I use Author, (Seller names I use), Demos, Freeware, In ROM, Not Purchased, Purchased, Removed Permanently and Shareware. Of course each product can appear in a number of "stores" but this gives me the ability to keep track of every program I have ever tried out. What happened to it, my comments on each in Notes, see cost as Demos move to Purchased and of course, the total amount of $$ spent on this project. I am VERY happy with this effort!

    Training - submitted by Bruce Chappell - thought you might be interested in how I use your HandyShopper program. I am a Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) (Part Time), and am responsible for training other EMTs in a hospital. Because of the dynamics of Emergency Medicine, I can't always start teaching a, then b, then c, etc. So I use Aisles to group things, such as Heart Monitors Aisle 5, then list the various things I have to cover, Alarm Volume, How to alter preset limits, etc.


    Wine Database - submitted by David Jacobs - well you get the idea.


    whoops.... forgot the link

    http://www.freewarepalm.com/database...-english.shtml
  4.    #4  
    Try AutoBuddy. It's freeware, and I think it does what you are trying to accomplish.
    Thanks but I did check out Auto Buddy and I can only find an alarm by date and time, not by odometer reading. I have several vehicles that get driven different amounts and different times of the year. There is no way to predict what date that a particular vehicle is going to reach the required mileage.

    I did just come across an app called CarCare http://www.carcaresoftware.com/mobile/top_intro.htm

    According to the description, it might just be able to do what I want it to. Anyone have any experience with it?
    Last edited by TheTechChik; 03/28/2005 at 02:44 PM.
  5.    #5  
    What you basically need is a database program. HandyShopper has been used for this
    And this will automatically trigger an alarm every 3000 miles for an oil change and every 5000 miles for tire rotations???

    I used HandyShopper a couple of years ago and never saw any features like that unless perhaps if you're an experienced programmer which I am not.

    I thought HandyShopper was basically just a filing cabinet of sorts. In other words it would be great for keeping a log of past repairs but not reminding me of upcoming needs except by date and time perhaps. Again that's not what I'm looking for.

    If HandyShopper can do what I want, I'd imagine it would take a considerable amount of time to set it up. I would prefer a program that is already designed to do that.
  6. #6  
    Quote Originally Posted by TheTechChik
    And this will automatically trigger an alarm every 3000 miles for an oil change and every 5000 miles for tire rotations???
    Dumb question, but how is the Treo supposed to know how many miles your car has?

    Have you tried TealAuto?


  7. #7  
    I use Quickmile Deluxe. It does exactly what you want, but you pay for what you get. $15 for the basic version, $25 for the deluxe version. It comes with a desktop conduit. www.quickmile.com
    Palm V-->Visor Deluxe-->Visor Prism-->Visorphone-->Treo 180-->Treo 600-->Treo 650 on Sprint-->Treo 700p-->Centro-->Diamond-->Pre-->HTC EVO 4g???!
  8.    #8  
    Dumb question, but how is the Treo supposed to know how many miles your car has?
    Not necessarily a dumb question but the answer is in my original post...

    Even though I don't care to track gas mileage, I wouldn't mind entering the current odometer reading at every fill up if that information could trigger an alarm on my palm that a maintenance need is due.
  9.    #9  
    I use Quickmile Deluxe. It does exactly what you want, but you pay for what you get. $15 for the basic version, $25 for the deluxe version. It comes with a desktop conduit. www.quickmile.com
    I'm heading over to check it out right now. Thanks.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by TheTechChik
    Not necessarily a dumb question but the answer is in my original post...
    Hmm good point


  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by TheTechChik
    Does anyone know of any palm software that will do that? I would really appreciate any recommendations.

    Mandy
    I've started using AutoMobile. I think it will get you what you want but it's a bit pricey at $20. http://linkesoft.com/automobil/
  12. #12  
    TealAuto - it does all of it for you.
  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by Lorea
    TealAuto - it does all of it for you.
    I use it to track mileage and car maintenance....but the only problem is, it doesn't seem to really support the 5-way Nav
  14.    #14  
    And The WINNER Is............. Teal Auto!

    Teal Auto presents a "Service Reminder" pop-up as well as a beep tone when you open the program if service is due. Most of the other apps that claim to have maintenance reminders require you to dig deeper into the app to find them instead of a pop-up alarm with an audio alert. I definately insist on a pop-up alert with an audio alert just like a calendar alarm. The whole point is, we are very busy people nowadays and I for one will not remember to look to see if maintenance is due. If I could remember that, then I'd remember to get those things done in the first place. If you make a habit of logging your odometer reading while the gas pump is running every time then it will always be up to date. I think I can remember to do that much.

    Teal Auto also has a decent built-in database of services and recommendations for service intervals for many types of service as well as the ability to add your own. Many of the other programs didn't support anything other than oil change notifications and no way to add additional services. After you perform a scheduled maintenance and log it, Teal Auto automatically schedules the next one based on current date and odometer reading for the next scheduled recommended mileage or time frame. No other user input required. Very convenient.

    Teal Auto also has a preference setting to alert you when you are within ____ days or ____ miles of a service due. You can set those numbers to whatever suits you.

    Some of the apps I tested had limits on the number of vehicles supported. Since I currently have 5 vehicles, that ruled those out. I haven't tested the upper limit of Teal Auto but the developer claims it supports an unlimited number of vehicles. I'm even thinking about putting my 2 generators in there so I can setup annual reminders to change the oil and add a fuel stabilizer right before winter.

    Lastly, some of the apps I checked out were not very user friendly whereas Teal Auto is. Check it out, decide for yourself. Unless there's one hiding out there that I missed, Teal Auto will be my choice.

    Again, my viewpoint and review is based on future reminders and not on past record keeping. Mind you, records will be there if you log them but that's not the major feature I was looking for.

    http://www.tealpoint.com/softauto.htm

    Mandy
  15. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Joebar
    Have you tried TealAuto?
    ahem

    congrats


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