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  1. #21  
    Yes, Sprint has had 800 MHz analog/digital roaming for quite some time, but they still do not operate any 800 MHz towers. They roam off of Verizon, Alltel, and all those other CDMA operaters that predominately use 800 MHz.

    Also, Sprint didn't buy Nextel; it was a merger of equals. Furthermore, the FCC ruled that Nextel had to give up its frequencies because they interfered with some emergency band radios. What did they receive in exchange for their spectrum? Lot's o' 1900 MHz bandwith all over the place.
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by Minsc
    Can you provide a link to anything to back this up? I'm not sure how carrying more bandwidth would affect building penetration.
    I could offer you plenty of papers I've written on the subject that use IEEE articles as sources, but that kind of stuff is not available online. I was researching this stuff years ago when 3G technologies were known in the networking world but not yet released.

    I'm speaking more in terms of general bandwidth and related interference (buildings, other signals, whatever). Although for each actual case the variables may differ.

    You can accept whatever you want regarding the matter. Bottom line is that each person has to use what works best for them.
  3. #23  
    My Sprint T650 is the first phone I've had that works in the elevator of my condo building. The 600 always lost connection. Others in my building ask what I have because their phone never works in the elevator, Sprint or otherwise. There must be something extra sensitive about the Sprint 650.
    Sprint Pre, Mugen 2800mah battery
  4. #24  
    Folks,

    Just to clear up a few points here:

    1) Sprint only has 1900 Spectrum, though they may share w/o roaming some 800 Mhz towers.
    2) The 800 Mhz spectrum from Nextel is not the same as tradtitional cellular or PCS, and therefore will never be seen by your Treo.
    3) 800 Mhz (Most Verizon, Alltel, some CIngular/AT&T) will always get through buildings better than 1900 (Sprint, T-Mobile) will. Someone was mentioning Verizon in florida -- I beleive Verizon is actually 1900 Mhz in much of florida...
    4) Signal strength on Treo's means nothing. For GSM it does approximate signal stength, while on CDMA it is more of a Signal to Noise ratio.

    I used to use Verizon CDMA in MA and have been on Sprint for the last few years. The drop off in coverage was much less with Verizon than it is with Sprint when you are in buildings.

    Glenn
  5. #25  
    Figuring out which carrier will give better building pen. is voodoo. Knowing that I went village witch doctor ( hey he has FAR more training than the average Sprint CSR) He informed me that sprint was good for the village but I would pay more when I was out in the bush
    keocera 7035>> treo600>> treo650>>700p>>755
    Notalent, but I make up for it with lots of practice
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by Glenn_Butler
    Folks,

    Just to clear up a few points here:

    1) Sprint only has 1900 Spectrum, though they may share w/o roaming some 800 Mhz towers.
    2) The 800 Mhz spectrum from Nextel is not the same as tradtitional cellular or PCS, and therefore will never be seen by your Treo.
    3) 800 Mhz (Most Verizon, Alltel, some CIngular/AT&T) will always get through buildings better than 1900 (Sprint, T-Mobile) will. Someone was mentioning Verizon in florida -- I beleive Verizon is actually 1900 Mhz in much of florida...
    4) Signal strength on Treo's means nothing. For GSM it does approximate signal stength, while on CDMA it is more of a Signal to Noise ratio.

    I used to use Verizon CDMA in MA and have been on Sprint for the last few years. The drop off in coverage was much less with Verizon than it is with Sprint when you are in buildings.

    Glenn

    I've already said most of what you just said. The signal strength bars shown on the phone mean nothing; however, if you look up the RSSI (?) information in the debug menu, that actually means something. Those bars are just a graphical depiction of your signal strength. ZLauncher shows I have full signal almost all of the time, but my phone app consistently shows one bar.
  7. #27  
    You cannot make accurate assumptions about building coverage based upon one person's experience. In any given situation there are many factors involved with signal strength...the particular mobile phone of the caller, the network configuration of that particular area, channel pollution in CDMA systems etc. People have been talking up the CDMA vs TDMA (example: Sprint/Verizon vs Cingular/Tmobile) for a few years now. I do know that CDMA systems can direct the callers phone to up the transmit power if the particular phone isnt already at its maximum due to the fact that they are inside as it is...thus explaining why coverage may be better for CDMA systems while inside. However channel pollution is much more a factor with CDMA so keeping site coverage overlap to a minimum is a must. In a heavily populated area a carrier must have the both the bandwidth to handle the necessary amount of callers and also branch the distance to the next site. A balance between both is ideal to reduce channel pollution. In this sense it is possible for a TDMA system to have more towers in a heavily populated area which will in turn result in better signal in-building. So the argument goes on... So far my experience is that CDMA systems have a more stable connection at lower signals then TDMA systems. I have used Verizon, Sprint, TMobile, and Cingular...with the exception of Cingular I have used the other 3 in the area I live in currently. Both Verizon and Sprint provided a better indoor connection that either Cingular or TMobile....especially TMobile. But as I said above this can change from area to area.
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