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  1.    #1  
    Hi all,

    Seen several posts on the GPS topic, and it seems TomTom/Seidio 2500 GPS car kit is a popular setup for lots of folks for doing GPS. I'm a little puzzled, though, by this Sprint PCS website page...

    http://www.sprint.com/business/produ...lPcsPhones.jsp

    ...which states that the Sprint (CDMA) Treo 600 "features an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS) chip." If the chip is included, why is any extra hardware (i.e. the Seidio) necessary to do GPS? Isn't there a way to just load GPS software to use said chip?

    FYI - I'm mostly interested in just plugging in GPS co-ordinates and then seeing compasses/maps (i.e. for geocaching.com type stuff), don't need street directions or anything like that. Is this possible using the 600 CDMA embedded chip with some 3rd party software?

    Thanks!
  2. #2  
    I can reply to the feature of the GPS chip. Most phones today have this type of a chip that can be used t determine the location of the phone. There is a setting to have the chip enabled all the time or only when in emergency 911 calls. This allows the ability for your location to be transmitted.

    As far as being able to use that chip for geocaching, I am not sure, but seems to me that you would not be able to get all the data you need. You would definately need the software to decode the chip data.

    I am not sure how well the feature chip does without an external antenna in the first place. That is definately a problem.
  3. #3  
    They're referring to a technology known as "SnapTrack" bought by Qualcomm awhile ago (http://www.snaptrack.com). It's built into most Sprint phones, but Sprint has dithered forever about opening up the interface to others citing privacy concerns (so default it to off and let users turn it on per app they want to authorize!). So instead we're all buying GPS units at $100 - $200 a pop to do the same things. Painful.

    As for how the antenna works, Snaptrack isn't a true GPS chip; it's a technology that allows Sprint to tell your location by triangulation with their towers. Thus the phone knowing its location is a matter of the phone receiving the location back from the network - in other words, Sprint needs to turn it on at their end, it's not something we can just do on the phone by ourselves.
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by DougKoz
    They're referring to a technology known as "SnapTrack" bought by Qualcomm awhile ago (http://www.snaptrack.com). It's built into most Sprint phones, but Sprint has dithered forever about opening up the interface to others citing privacy concerns (so default it to off and let users turn it on per app they want to authorize!). So instead we're all buying GPS units at $100 - $200 a pop to do the same things. Painful.

    As for how the antenna works, Snaptrack isn't a true GPS chip; it's a technology that allows Sprint to tell your location by triangulation with their towers. Thus the phone knowing its location is a matter of the phone receiving the location back from the network - in other words, Sprint needs to turn it on at their end, it's not something we can just do on the phone by ourselves.
    My old Sprint phone had the ability to turn it on and for 911 only usage. That seems to me that it is also user enabled. I also have been with Nextel with work phones that had the same ability.

    It sort of sounds logical to use towers to traingulate, but that is incredibly barbaric to call it GPS. The ability to determine tower usage has beel around probably since cell towers began developing, I would think.

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