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  1.    #1  
    I just got a Stowaway keyboard and am looking for a good little word processing program. Anyone got any good ideas?
  2. #2  
    If you are using a keyboard, pedit is definitely the way to go! Possibly the most keyboard friendly palm app ever :-) You can get the latest versions from http://www.math.ohio-state.edu/~nevai/palm
  3. #3  
    Originally posted by dkessler:
    If you are using a keyboard, pedit is definitely the way to go! Possibly the most keyboard friendly palm app ever :-) You can get the latest versions from http://www.math.ohio-state.edu/~nevai/palm
    It looks good, however a $20 aplication is a little expensive for me. As a student I'm looking for a freeware or maybe a $5 to $10 good shareware.

    let me know if anyone knows about one...

    Al

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    Stowaway is the Visor way to go..!
  4. #4  
    I have used pedit since January and think it's great. There are many features that are more advanced than a liberal arts major like me will ever use, but I find it very easy to use for my purposes. I take lots of notes during the day and pedit has become my default notetaking device. I particularly like the ability to switch between memos, jump to the top or bottom, and select large blocks of text with double taps; by word, sentence or paragraph; or by location of the cursor. I also use it with the Stowaway regularly and have had no problems. As far as the price, it costs the same as SmartDoc, MagicText and QED. The only thing that I would improve is the manual, which appears to have been written by a math major. But I understand that the author is working on this. By the way, there is a new version of pedit-4.02-posted on PalmGear today.
  5. #5  
    Which version of pedit do you use (there are 3)?

    peditLite, pedit, or pedit32

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    MarkEagle - Ice is nice!

    [This message has been edited by MarkEagle (edited 07-16-2000).]
  6. #6  
    I vote for pedit, too. I use the new PeditPro, which combines pedit and pedit32 in a single program.

    For me, the biggest pedit advantage is that it creates documents in MemoPad format, so you can hotsync them to your desktop through the MemoPad conduit. Unfortunately, longer documents (which require pedit32) must be broken up into 3k chunks for hotsyncing, and then reconstructed on your desktop. Pedit has loads of functionality, some of which I've found found very helpful and others I've found useless (although other people probably differ on which functions are best).

    In the other programs, you create DOC files which are hotsynced through the Backup conduit and then must be converted into a desktop word-processing program. (To my knowledge, no converters exist for Macs, only PCs.) You can also transfer DOC files to your desktop through the DocsToGo conduit, but not in the other direction (where it translates them to its own proprietary format which can't be edited).

    SmartDoc seems to be a good program if you want to work in the DOC format, although it doesn't have as much functionality as pedit. TakeNote! creates documents in either format, depending on size, which is useful. But larger documents can only be created in DOC format, and can't be broken into smaller chunks for hotsyncing. I tried QED, but I found the interface extremely confusing. (Pedit's interface is unusual, too, but more intuitive and contains much more functionality.)

    You can also translate pedit files into DOC format to share them or read them with other programs, if you want.

    PeditPro is expensive at $32, but I found it worth the money. TakeNote! seems to be a good program but it's even more expensive. SmartDoc seems to be a better deal in the DOC format at $20.
  7. #7  
    "Mac Palm Doc" converts doc files into text. I've been using it ever since I got my Stowaway. It is fast and easy, plus it remembers your backup folder so you can get to your doc file faster. It also converts text files into doc files. I think I found it at Palmgear. There is an option to register, but so far it hasn't bugged me or given me any time limit. Check it out if you have a Mac.
  8. #8  
    Maybe I'm just being pedantic, but aren't all the programs mentioned (Pedit, TakeNote!, SmartDoc, et al) all 'text editors' rather than word processors?

    In what way do they process the words, as opposed to the document as a whole?
  9. #9  
    Thanks, lennonhead. Mac Palm Doc seems like a good program. Don't know how I missed it!

    Maybe you are being pedantic, Nurcombe, but maybe you're not. What's the difference? I mostly use the Visor/Stowaway combination for long text entry or composing while traveling, and format the document back at my desktop. I suppose that qualifies as text editing, but why wouldn't you consider it word processing, too?
  10. #10  
    This is a rant I've had elsewhere in the forum, so I'll keep it brief.

    I want to be able to format the document on the handheld, rather than having to go through the document again, on the desktop.

    That is my personal definition of word processing.
  11. #11  
    Originally posted by nurcombe:
    This is a rant I've had elsewhere in the forum, so I'll keep it brief.

    I want to be able to format the document on the handheld, rather than having to go through the document again, on the desktop.

    That is my personal definition of word processing.
    I agree with you 100%. I think a lot of it has to do with the state of the PalmOS/hardware. As the devices get more powerful, there will no doubt be more powerful (true) word processors. Paragraph formatting, character styles, margins, spell check, etc..etc.. I believe the best compromise with regards to size and features is probably the Pocket PC with its Pocket Word app.

    However, I have found that for a lot of data entry tasks that require me to use the Visor (ie, note taking @ school or biz meetings, etc..), I don't have a lot of time to format my document. So taking the doc and doing some formatting in word (if necessary) isn't too big of an issue for me.

    It will be nice when the day comes that I can store editable PDFs (or some other format) on my handheld, type in what I want it to say (or have a database with a report) and be able to print it out to an IR printer (or hook up to a customers wireless LAN and transfer the document to their email/desktop/etc..) When that day comes, it will be the PDAs that have the formatting/graphics/spell check/high end functionality that will definitely have the edge.

    Joe
  12. #12  
    I'm not sure I agree with you guys. I think you're asking a PDA to be a computer and not taking it on its own terms. What you're looking for is a laptop computer reduced to the size of a handheld. Yes, one day the technology will get us there -- but it's not there yet.

    On the other hand, a PDA offers one key advantage which more powerful laptops can't. It's so small and portable you can carry it with you all the time. But to get there -- for the time being -- you have to sacrifice the functionality of a larger and more powerful machine. The genius of the Palm OS is that it provides simple, functional, no-frills but effective capabilities that take maximum advantage of the PDA's principal advantage, its portability. (See Jeff Hawkin's speech at last month's PC Expo.) Windows CE and Newton failed because they didn't understand that.

    I'm not sure I'll want to use my PDA as a full-fledged word processor even when it gets the capability. That seems to me to be a function better served by a computer with a permanently attached keyboard, which would make the PDA too large to carry around with you all the time, which would defeat the very purpose of a PDA in the first place.

    Why don't you guys look into the Psion or PocketPC which offer more traditional computer capabilities?
  13. #13  
    I'll add that word processing isn't going to work well without WYSIWYG capabilities that are impractical on a handheld. Even the PPC doesn't have enough resolution for a useful Print Layout view (Microsoft Word speak). If you really want word processing, you need to look at the larger form factor CE based products, like the Jornada 690 or 820. Of course, by the time that you get to the 820s 640x480 screen and $800 price tag, maybe it is time to just get a real laptop!

    [This message has been edited by yucca (edited 07-20-2000).]
  14. #14  
    Originally posted by rosswords:
    I'm not sure I agree with you guys. I think you're asking a PDA to be a computer and not taking it on its own terms. What you're looking for is a laptop computer reduced to the size of a handheld. Yes, one day the technology will get us there -- but it's not there yet.
    I don't agree, I'm afraid.

    First, there have been many large (5000 word+) pure-text documents written using the Palm OS and editors like QED. I've done several and it's not hard to find people who will say that it's quite practical to write large documents using a Palm device and a keyboard.

    In 1981, I purchased a $4000 IBM desktop computer with a screaming 8Mhz processor, 64K of RAM, and *two* high density floppy drives, each capable of holding about 1.3 megs. The $249 Visor Deluxe has three times the total memory and twice the speed. The only thing the IBM could do which the Visor can't is edit a formatted word processing file.

    The Palm OS should be able to handle a formatted word processor file, even without a WYSIWYG display.

    There's a project -- WordStar for the Palm OS. If I remember corrctly, WordStar was only about 800k or thereabouts. That's huge for a Palm OS program, but if it were written to run from a Flash ROM module this wouldn't be a big problem.

    Why don't you guys look into the Psion or PocketPC which offer more traditional computer capabilities?
    I prefer the Stowaway keyboard to the keyboard on my Psion Series 7. The Psion 7 costs around $900 and it's more difficult to carry. Finally, I'm already carrying the Visor around anyway. In fact, my impression is that most people who use a P7 use it almost exclusively for editing MS Office documents on the go.

    The big drawback to the Palm OS for this is, of course, the screen. I'm not sure that a full-featured word processor for the Palm OS would completely replace a laptop or large handheld, but it would likely see some use.
  15. #15  
    "The Palm OS should be able to handle a formatted word processor file, even without a WYSIWYG display."

    It can! Just learn some basic HTML markup. Then you can use any ordinary text editor such as pedit or even the standard memopad to create documents that will be nicely formatted when you bring them into a PC wordprocessing app. The basic html tags for bold, italics, headings, when viewed in source form really don't hurt readability a bit. Anyone who learned to use the DOS version of WordPerfect should be very comfortable working in this "reveal codes" mode :-)
  16. #16  
    The one thing I have against using the html tags in a document is output. I have found on several occasions I will be working with a group and using the Visor for data input. It would be nice to get some formatting in the document so i could then take the document and print it out on a IR printer.

    Sure I *COULD* technically type in codes, hotsync to the computer, convert to a word doc, then run a macro or something that would convert it to how i wanted it to look, then print it.. however, it seems much easier to me to type a doc, have some formatting built in and then IR print and be done with it.

    In anycase, the current setup is still a HUGE improvement from handwriting notes and then having to retype them if wanted.. so I can't complain too much..

    Joe
  17. #17  
    Wordstar for the Palm. Sounds very interesting - where can one find it?

    thx
  18. #18  
    If you're going to use tags then go all the way...

    LaTeX
  19. #19  
    Originally posted by acajigas:
    It looks good, however a $20 aplication is a little expensive for me. As a student I'm looking for a freeware or maybe a $5 to $10 good shareware.

    let me know if anyone knows about one...

    Al

    1. Paul Nevai may give you a discount as a student. You will need to prove that you are a student somehow. Email him.

    2. As a student myself, I've tried SmartDoc and QED. They're O.K., but are lacking. pedit (and its various flavors) is really what you are looking for. I used QED for the Fall/Spring semester, been using pedit32 for the summer session, and wish I had it from the beginning.
  20. #20  
    Originally posted by dkessler:
    It can! Just learn some basic HTML markup. Then you can use any ordinary text editor such as pedit or even the standard memopad to create documents that will be nicely formatted when you bring them into a PC wordprocessing app.
    Oo -- good thought! That hadn't occurred to me at all. And, of course, it's a good idea to learn HTML codes anyway...

    I guess you'd create the documents using, say, pEdit or QED, bring them over to the desktop, convert the PDB in your backup directory to a .TXT, change or rename the .TXT to a .HTML, and then open it in an HTML editor like, say, MS Word.

    Nifty -- it would be nice if there were a Palm based program which could automate this a bit.


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