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  1.    #1  
    I'm a long-time PalmOS user (and programmer). I've progressed from the Pilot, through about a dozen PalmOS devices (including Palm, Handspring, Sony, Symbol, etc.), through the Treo 300 and currently to the Treo 600.

    While I still hope for many more moons use from my 600, I have become a bit envious of my wife's 650.

    However, I've been reconsidering my desire for an "all-in-one" device. Every smartphone seems to trail behind both the current high-end phones and pdas, yet costs as much as either (or both...). As a PDA, the 650, while certainly an improvement on the 600, still has a small screen, limited connectivity (802.11 / bluetooth-DUN*), etc. As a phone, it is bulky, with average sound quality. (Some might argue "below average"...)

    (* - Yeah, I know about the patch, and the promise of an official patch, but Sprint is not the speediest company when it comes to releasing such beasties...)

    I've been thinking of purchasing a separate Sprint bluetooth-enabled phone and a PDA with Bluetooth/802.11whatever/etc., and using DUN to connect to the Internet, but I am worried about the useability and speed of such an idea. How quick and transparent is a DUN connection from a PDA (or laptop)? Particularly compared to the 600 or 650 with an already-up PCS Vision connection?

    As an example, I've grown used to quickly checking my mail from my Treo whenever the mood strikes me (a bad habit from my Crackberry days...). What is the process and how much more difficult would it be to use the DUN connection from a PDA when I want to check my email (via Snappermail)?

    Has anyone tried this with any success? Your preference? (I expect bias towards the 650 here, but hope to hear some practical experience on the Bluetooth front.)

    Thanks,
    John
  2. #2  
    I've used my bluetooth cell to connect my ipaq 2210 and Palm T3 to the net, don't really see why there would be any major difference in speed, I'm using the same EDGE connection so it should be the same ( someone fill me in if I'm wrong ).

    It all comes down to personal preference, do you want to carry 1 or 2 devices? For me, definitely only 1! While it can be considered bulky, for what it does, I'm amazed at the size...
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  3.    #3  
    I can understand the complaint about the "Batman Utility Belt". Been there and done that. (The danger of working as a developer for multiple devices means that I've had up to a half dozen wireless devices in various pockets at times. Often worried about my fertility and mutations, but my daughter seems okay so far.

    I think my biggest complaint is the technology lag that the Treos have as PDAs. 802.11 still seems iffy with the Treo, but is readily available for other devices. The screen (size, resolution, and colors) lags behind other devices. I have to depend on the largesse of Sprint for OS patches and updates. Etc.

    And, please, nobody get me wrong. I like my wife's 650 (and my 600 (and our old 300's, at least until I almost got thrown out of a B?st Buy when they wouldn't replace it when the flip-cover broke))). I'm just re-considering whether the convergent route is still the best for my needs.
  4. #4  
    btw, in regards to :

    What is the process and how much more difficult would it be to use the DUN connection from a PDA when I want to check my email (via Snappermail)?
    Once you become familar with how to set it up ( and since you've worked with these before, you'll pick it up fast ) and once it is set up, it's not much more difficult...it just requires a few more clicks on 2 seperate devices instead of 1.
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  5. #5  
    I used my T3 to connect over BT to a Sony Ericsson prior to switching to the 650. The connection steps are basically the same in both cases (open up Snappermail and check mail, and the BT hookup happens automatically, assuming you leave BT active on both devices, which I did), and the network throughput once connected is roughly the same, but the time to connect seems *much* faster on the 650. There's also the fact that a Palm device like the T3 or Treo can only handle a single BT connection at a time. So when I was checking email, I couldn't have my handsfree connected in case a call came in, etc. Now the network connectivity is "native", so I can use the BT stack for other things.

    I agree with the concerns about "doing many things at an average level, rather than one thing very well". The physical size of the screen is noticeably smaller than my T3, which takes some getting used to. And the phone is larger than some people are willing to bear. But for my taste, this situation is an improvement in convenience and a simplification, with very little lost from my T3 or Sony Ericsson combination (some screen size and a loss of some resident RAM).

    The phone/PDA combination is definitely a viable option, though, and you should consider it. The only other caution I'd throw out there is that standalone PDAs are definitely a waning fad, while smartphones are gaining market share. That shouldn't totally drive your decision, but you will have fewer interesting PDA models to choose from than in the past.
  6. #6  
    Well one of the reasons I went with the 650 ( I had an m505 w/ a SE t39m that could connect via BT) was because my contact information was getting segmented. I had numbers on my t39, that I didn't have on my palm and vice versa. While the BT connection allowed my to initiate calls via my palm, keeping the data up to date became a pain.
  7. #7  
    Keep in mind that Sprint doesn't offer lots of choices in the low end phones that are BT enabled. I found only one--LG PM-325

    Whether you use T650 or another BT phone, DUN is not going to be different. You're simply connecting via dialup and working from your laptop.
  8. #8  
    I don't know if there are similar options on Windows, but iSync on the Mac keeps your PDA, phone and desktop address book in sync nicely. Does the same for calendar data, too.
  9. #9  
    I am trying out treo to replace the my h4150 and v551 combo.

    I am finding it very hard to get used to.
    cons:
    1. The treo is big and heavy.
    2. Battery life is r compared to a regular phone
    3. Can;t keep treo in cradle or i will miss calls if i walk away.
    5. Treo has small screen

    pros:
    1. faster connection
    2. better one hand operation than regular pda.
  10. cec
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    #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by menachh
    I am trying out treo to replace the my h4150 and v551 combo.

    I am finding it very hard to get used to.
    cons:
    1. The treo is big and heavy.
    2. Battery life is r compared to a regular phone
    3. Can;t keep treo in cradle or i will miss calls if i walk away.
    5. Treo has small screen

    pros:
    1. faster connection
    2. better one hand operation than regular pda.
    True the screen on the Treo is smaller than a stand alone PDA but it makes up for it with terrific resolution and brightness.

    Treo bulky? Compared to a phone/PDA combo the Treo is downright svelt - try fitting your phone and PDA in the same pocket. I think the size of the Treo is spot on. Any smaller and the keyboard and or screen becomes less usable. Any bigger and it becomes a brick. I am a big fan of the Treo form factor.

    I tried the 2 device route (Nokia 6230 - Ipaq 4705) for a while after selling my Treo 600 and decided it was just too much gear to haul around. Two batteries to charge, two cases to carry, two adapters to carry - you get the idea. Now that I have my 650, the Nokia 6230 is for sale. EBay item # 575289429 if anyone is interested.

    IMHO, the convenience of a single device outweighs any added functionality of a PDA/phone combo.
  11. #11  
    I have recently (fortnight back) got Nokia 6230 to make up for lacking BT and EDGE in Treo 600. I discovered Nokia 6230 to be handy, lighweight and very good phone. I wonder that for every feature on Treo 600 I have to pay extra, P1 provides little. It is a recurring expence - and even no proper support from P1 or software vendors. They did not release the BT driver for Palm OS 5.0 so that Palm BT card could have worked with Treo 600 and many hundred happy customers. There is no support for streaming video, no great display, no active TFT etc, no bigger ROM and RAM,..etc. I wonder why P1 does not enable Treo 600 on features required by most customers. Why it lags in leading technologies?

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