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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by imageone
    I don't think LAME has been updated since the last version of iTunes. I guess Apple break's the LAME code some how. So back to the hard way until update.
    It may be "hard" in that it requires a bit more work on the front end, but after having converted all of my purchased music using Hymn, only to have Apple break them in the next release of iTunes, I just resigned myself to burning/ripping to a full /mp3 version to avoid future hassles.

    A little extra effort at the beginning, but guaranteed to save you hassles later.
  2. nickl's Avatar
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       #22  
    Thanks, all. I will try a couple methods if I ever get time and report what worked best. The Lame thing (I always seem to be doing the lame thing) sound easiest - be nice to know if an update was forthcoming.
  3. #23  
    The latest version of iTunes (I have 4.7) will not let you burn purchased music to a CD.

    Bahstahds!

    There is a project called HYMN (Hear Your Music Anywhere) that is working on a more permanant solution to the ongoing problem of balancing the rights of consumers and the recording industry. It allows you to change the format without losing sound quality (as with going from CD format and back to MP3) while mainting "signature" puchase and identity data.

    http://hymn-project.org/

    They have solid legal backing and hopefully Apple will pull their heads out of their behinds, buy it and integrate it with a later version of iTunes.


    I fear that will only occur after 17 layers of bureaucratic BS.

    Until the needs of both sides can be met and agreed upon, people will build decription hacks and Apple will systematically quash them.

    So sad, that I can't even backup my own purchased goods onto a format that won't implode when my PC does.
  4. #24  
    >The latest version of iTunes (I have 4.7) will not let you burn purchased music to a CD.

    This works for myself and anybody else. Not sure what problem you're having.
  5. #25  
    Quote Originally Posted by imediasearch
    http://hymn-project.org/

    They have solid legal backing and hopefully Apple will pull their heads out of their behinds
    With all due respect, you need to pull YOUR head out your behind.

    HYMN does not have solid legal backing. It is only tacking the money away from the artists that give you the music you listen to. The government, the RIAA, the musicians... nobody is backing this, except for those who want to rip the musicians off.

    By the way, 4.7 can burn any format to a CD... an unlimited number of times.

    In regards to doing it without losing sound quality, anytime you output to some sort of lossy compression (like say the MP3 format that you mention) you lose sound quality. Your point is misguided anyway, as HYMN has nothing to do with CDs.

    AND in regard to your fear of losing your data, iTunes will let your burn an Audio CD, an MP3 CD a data CD or a data DVD to give you assurance of always having your music, not losing it. Oh, and any purchased music that you may have accidentally deleted or whatever can be redownloaded by contacting iTMS support.

    As far as spreading fear, uncertainty and doubt goes, I think you have failed. If you don't like iTunes, or Apple for that matter, you can always try Microsoft's store or Napster's or Walmart or Sony's Connect or Real Networks or eMusic or Disney's or Virgin or... well you get my point; People have a choice. Or you can always buy an actual music CD or DVD.

    Or in your case you can continue using the Peer to peer networks to continue stealing from the artists.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by iomatic
    btw, i'd like to take this opportunity to breathe a bit of relief, after being on so many different boards throughout these years, this has got to be the most adult, civilized, helpful, and responsive board I've been on in, like, forever. Cheers!
    Guess you haven't ventured over the the Off Topic board!
  7. #27  
    With all due respect is just about as worthless a statement as anyone can make. In your case it is an insincere attempt to dignify or add credibility to your decidedly erroneous declarations.

    If you can move beyond your patently absurd postings for a moment, try to read what I have written, instead of climbing on your horse for an unrelated rant.

    Check again on legal backing, you are just plain wrong.

    Burning purchased iTunes music onto a CD with 4.7? Again, you are wrong. iTunes produces a simple error message when you attempt to do this.

    When one attempts to burn a disc using only purchased music, the following message appears:

    "None of the items on this play list can be burned to a disc"

    At no time was I spreading fear and uncertainty, again you are wrong. I simply noted that you cannot transfer purchased music to a CD.

    I didn't say anything about ripping musicians off, you did. I specifically pointed out the needs of BOTH sides need to be met.

    As to your insinuation that I am stealing music, buddy you can crawl back into whatever hole you climbed out of and take your unfounded accusations with you.

    The rest of your misappropriated "points" are equally as pathetic and irrelevant, but I have better things to do than communicate with lowlifes who make unfounded accusations and contribute nothing worthy to a discussion.

    I will however offer you my pity, I think you deserve that more than anything else.
  8. #28  
    Quote Originally Posted by imediasearch
    With all due respect is just about as worthless a statement as anyone can make. In your case it is an insincere attempt to dignify or add credibility to your decidedly erroneous declarations.

    If you can move beyond your patently absurd postings for a moment, try to read what I have written, instead of climbing on your horse for an unrelated rant.

    Check again on legal backing, you are just plain wrong.

    Burning purchased iTunes music onto a CD with 4.7? Again, you are wrong. iTunes produces a simple error message when you attempt to do this.

    When one attempts to burn a disc using only purchased music, the following message appears:

    "None of the items on this play list can be burned to a disc"

    At no time was I spreading fear and uncertainty, again you are wrong. I simply noted that you cannot transfer purchased music to a CD.

    I didn't say anything about ripping musicians off, you did. I specifically pointed out the needs of BOTH sides need to be met.

    As to your insinuation that I am stealing music, buddy you can crawl back into whatever hole you climbed out of and take your unfounded accusations with you.

    The rest of your misappropriated "points" are equally as pathetic and irrelevant, but I have better things to do than communicate with lowlifes who make unfounded accusations and contribute nothing worthy to a discussion.

    I will however offer you my pity, I think you deserve that more than anything else.

    You are dead wrong. iTunes 4.7.1 can burn purchased music from the iTunes music store to create normal audio cd's. I do this all the time.
  9. #29  
    Well, you can... unless, you use HYMN to strip the DRM. What happens is the song will play but it still has a finger print that iTunes sees and unless that computer is registered to the song, it won't be able to burn the song to a CD.

    It shouldn't be a problem for legal music though. All you have to do "imediasearch", is go to the "Advanced" menu item of iTunes and select "Authorize Computer...". No problem, right.

    Oh, and "imedia"... a service provider in India (or whereever project HYMN ran to in an effort to get someone to host it) willing to go to court does not count as "legal backing". It means they are oblivious to the stakes at hand or are stupid and willing to take the chance in getting dragged to court.
    Last edited by archie; 04/08/2005 at 03:46 PM.
  10. #30  
    Yeah, I don't get imediasearch's problem burning itunes. s/he just needs to burn as AIFF/audio CD format.
    -mbd26
  11. gcs
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    #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by jnrjr79
    You are dead wrong. iTunes 4.7.1 can burn purchased music from the iTunes music store to create normal audio cd's. I do this all the time.
    Quote Originally Posted by imediasearch
    Burning purchased iTunes music onto a CD with 4.7? Again, you are wrong. iTunes produces a simple error message when you attempt to do this.
    You're BOTH RIGHT!

    If you try to burn an AUDIO CD, iTunes 4.7.1 will let you burn your protected music just fine.

    If you try to burn a MP3 CD, iTunes 4.7.1 will prevent you from burning your protected music.

    To remove the DRM (Digital Rights Mangement - aka copy protection), you must either use the legally murky jhymn software, or simply burn your purchased music to an audio cd, then re-import it.

    The average person will likely never hear the difference (I can't hear any difference on my studio monitors).

    Hope this helps,
    George
  12. #32  
    I can hear the difference, even on a portable CD player if I listen carefully. Definitely on my home audio system. But then I don't really listen to many mp3s on my home system.
    Bob Meyer
    I'm out of my mind. But feel free to leave a message.
  13. #33  
    Does anyone have any advice on saving the music info? (so that when I legally convert the protected AAC file to an mp3 by burning to a CD and then ripping them from the CD that I don't have to re-enter the song title, author, etc info?)
  14. gcs
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    #34  
    Quote Originally Posted by meyerweb
    I can hear the difference, even on a portable CD player if I listen carefully. Definitely on my home audio system. But then I don't really listen to many mp3s on my home system.
    If you go from AAC (protected) at 128 to MP3 at 128, you'll surely hear the difference. I just burn to CD, and re-rip as high quality AAC (removing the copy protection), and I really can't tell.

    As a matter of interest, I just used Audio Hijack Pro to capture a protected, and unprotected version of the same song, brought it into an audio editing app, reversed the phase, and copied one over the other. A duplicate version of the song, would result in a silent file. It was nearly silent, you could hear some of the song, so you're right, there is a difference between the two files, but it was hardly anything at all.

    Every time I've stayed as AAC 128 files, I really can't tell myself, but then again, years of standing next to a drummer have probably taken their toll...

    George
  15. gcs
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    #35  
    Quote Originally Posted by wcarlson40
    Does anyone have any advice on saving the music info? (so that when I legally convert the protected AAC file to an mp3 by burning to a CD and then ripping them from the CD that I don't have to re-enter the song title, author, etc info?)
    Hi,

    Actually, iTunes kept this when I just burned an audio cd, and re-imported as AAC (unprotected). It asked me if I wanted to replace my existing songs (I chose not to).

    George
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       #36  
    Quote Originally Posted by gcs
    Every time I've stayed as AAC 128 files, I really can't tell myself, but then again, years of standing next to a drummer have probably taken their toll...

    George
    What did you say?
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