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  1. Minsc's Avatar
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    #41  
    The thing I don't get is what exactly Shadowmite's sound patch "fixed." Clearly there are some 650 owners who are unaffected by sound problems, and haven't loaded a patch of any sort. This makes it seem more like a hardware problem than a software problem.
    Either that or we've got a classic problem of "what sounds fine to one person is garbled to another." Not an unlikely scenario given the subjective nature of cell phone sound quality.
  2. #42  
    The 650 is quite an improvement sound wise and over my Sanyo/Samsung freebie whatever it was. Keeps a call better in my place too (where I used to get frequent drops with my old phone). I am getting used to the cool things it can do and am starting to wish for more stuff (multi-tasking, taking calls while on the web on my CDMA version). Hopefully I will be moving overseas in a year or so, a great excuse to upgrade to whatever is out. Great tool now as is though!
  3. faisal's Avatar
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    #43  
    I saw this and laughed. This was their approach to the problem. Why didnt they just forward everyone to www.shadowmite.com



    < Home < Support
    Support Knowledge Library








    Solution ID: 29556


    Improving voice quality with Treo smartphones

    The Treo smartphone's handset is one component in a sophisticated communication chain connecting you to the person you are calling. Many things can contribute to the quality of voice on a single call:

    Wireless network issues
    Echo cancellation technology
    Signal strength
    Environment (loud traffic, weather, noisy gatherings, solar flares, etc)
    The recipient's phone
    The individual connection between the two phones
    ... and much more.

    We'll try to help you with the factors you can control.

    Is the other person hearing an echo?
    Echos can result from external factors mentioned above (network issues, low coverage, environment, etc.).

    Here is what you can do to improve voice quality if the other person hears an echo when they talk to you:


    Turn it down: Try decreasing your smartphone's volume to avoid coupling or feedback on the receiver's end (i.e. the other person hears their voice as it goes through your speaker, is picked up by your microphone, and gets sent back to them with a slight delay as it travels through the network). This applies to both speakerphone and the built-in ear speaker.

    Hold it correctly: Position your smartphone's handset closer to your ear, to prevent sound from leaking back to the microphone. Be sure you're holding the smartphone so that your hand is not near the microphone hole. Your hand (or any other reflecting surface) will tend to conduct the speaker sound down to the microphone, and cause echo on the recipient's end. Try holding the device with your other hand or keeping your palm away from the microphone hole.

    Flip it over: If you're using speakerphone mode with the device lying on a flat surface, try turning it "face-down" so that the screen is facing the surface. This will prevent the surface from reflecting sound into the microphone hole on the back.

    Adjust your case: Are you using a third-party case with your smartphone? Some users have noticed that if the case's microphone opening is misaligned so that it covers the microphone, the recipient hears an echo. Make sure the microphone is completely uncovered.

    Is the other person hearing extra noise or distortion?
    Again, extra noise or distortion can happen due to many factors, some of which may be out of your control. Here is what you can control:


    Charge it: When the other person hears distortion, first check your battery level. If it's extremely low, give it a quick charge and see if your voice quality improves.

    Try another: Does the issue occur for all callers, and not just one or two people? If some recipients hear distortion, but others don't, the issue is probably not occurring on your Treo smartphone, and there's not much you can do to remedy the situation, other than follow general guidelines for being in areas of strong wireless coverage.

    Other wireless possibilities: As always, make sure you're in an area with ample wireless coverage. Specific network issues or signal reflections may cause distortion. If the issue happens only sporadically (not constantly), try to make and receive calls in places where these wireless issues don't interfere with your conversation.

    Drop test? Have you dropped, banged or bent your phone, possibly causing internal damage? If the microphone or speaker becomes damaged, the other person may hear extra noise or distortion when they speak to you. To restore your smartphone to working order, you'll need to arrange for a repair. Information on the repair process.

    Are you hearing your own voice echo?
    As with any mobile phone, if you hear your own voice echo, the echo is originating at the other person's handset, and not yours. The reason is the same as above (you're hearing your voice filtered through the other person's speaker, back through their microphone, back to you). Ask the other person to turn down the volume on their phone, or hold the speaker closer to their ear so that you don't get the feedback.

    Hearing intermittent static?
    The cause of static is usually a physical barrier between your smartphone and the cell tower with which it is communicating. If you're in a moving car, you might hear this static when you pass under a bridge, for example.

    Try and get a good path between your communicator and the cell tower. Since you don't always know where the cell tower is (and they're often well hidden), our general advice is to steer clear of physical obstacles that could block the path.

    Is your voice too quiet on the other end?
    This is also something that can be dependent on the connection, or the recipient's phone. One useful bit of advice (that might seem obvious but you might not always think about it) is to be sure to hold the microphone close to your mouth. This has been known to dramatically improve voice quality on all types of phones, because the microphones are optimized for certain distances between the handset and the source of the sound.

    If you are using a hands-free headset, try positioning the microphone closer to your mouth.

    Note: the presence of a third party product in this article should be not be construed as an endorsement of that product, nor should its absence be considered a denigration. palmOne does not manufacture any third-party products mentioned above, and cannot provide support for them. If you purchase a third-party product and require help with it, contact the manufacturer.


  4. #44  
    Quote Originally Posted by faisal
    I saw this and laughed. This was their approach to the problem. Why didnt they just forward everyone to www.shadowmite.com



    < Home < Support
    Support Knowledge Library








    Solution ID: 29556


    Improving voice quality with Treo smartphones

    The Treo smartphone's handset is one component in a sophisticated communication chain connecting you to the person you are calling. Many things can contribute to the quality of voice on a single call:

    Wireless network issues
    Echo cancellation technology
    Signal strength
    Environment (loud traffic, weather, noisy gatherings, solar flares, etc)
    The recipient's phone
    The individual connection between the two phones
    ... and much more.

    We'll try to help you with the factors you can control.

    Is the other person hearing an echo?
    Echos can result from external factors mentioned above (network issues, low coverage, environment, etc.).

    Here is what you can do to improve voice quality if the other person hears an echo when they talk to you:


    Turn it down: Try decreasing your smartphone's volume to avoid coupling or feedback on the receiver's end (i.e. the other person hears their voice as it goes through your speaker, is picked up by your microphone, and gets sent back to them with a slight delay as it travels through the network). This applies to both speakerphone and the built-in ear speaker.

    Hold it correctly: Position your smartphone's handset closer to your ear, to prevent sound from leaking back to the microphone. Be sure you're holding the smartphone so that your hand is not near the microphone hole. Your hand (or any other reflecting surface) will tend to conduct the speaker sound down to the microphone, and cause echo on the recipient's end. Try holding the device with your other hand or keeping your palm away from the microphone hole.

    Flip it over: If you're using speakerphone mode with the device lying on a flat surface, try turning it "face-down" so that the screen is facing the surface. This will prevent the surface from reflecting sound into the microphone hole on the back.

    Adjust your case: Are you using a third-party case with your smartphone? Some users have noticed that if the case's microphone opening is misaligned so that it covers the microphone, the recipient hears an echo. Make sure the microphone is completely uncovered.

    Is the other person hearing extra noise or distortion?
    Again, extra noise or distortion can happen due to many factors, some of which may be out of your control. Here is what you can control:


    Charge it: When the other person hears distortion, first check your battery level. If it's extremely low, give it a quick charge and see if your voice quality improves.

    Try another: Does the issue occur for all callers, and not just one or two people? If some recipients hear distortion, but others don't, the issue is probably not occurring on your Treo smartphone, and there's not much you can do to remedy the situation, other than follow general guidelines for being in areas of strong wireless coverage.

    Other wireless possibilities: As always, make sure you're in an area with ample wireless coverage. Specific network issues or signal reflections may cause distortion. If the issue happens only sporadically (not constantly), try to make and receive calls in places where these wireless issues don't interfere with your conversation.

    Drop test? Have you dropped, banged or bent your phone, possibly causing internal damage? If the microphone or speaker becomes damaged, the other person may hear extra noise or distortion when they speak to you. To restore your smartphone to working order, you'll need to arrange for a repair. Information on the repair process.

    Are you hearing your own voice echo?
    As with any mobile phone, if you hear your own voice echo, the echo is originating at the other person's handset, and not yours. The reason is the same as above (you're hearing your voice filtered through the other person's speaker, back through their microphone, back to you). Ask the other person to turn down the volume on their phone, or hold the speaker closer to their ear so that you don't get the feedback.

    Hearing intermittent static?
    The cause of static is usually a physical barrier between your smartphone and the cell tower with which it is communicating. If you're in a moving car, you might hear this static when you pass under a bridge, for example.

    Try and get a good path between your communicator and the cell tower. Since you don't always know where the cell tower is (and they're often well hidden), our general advice is to steer clear of physical obstacles that could block the path.

    Is your voice too quiet on the other end?
    This is also something that can be dependent on the connection, or the recipient's phone. One useful bit of advice (that might seem obvious but you might not always think about it) is to be sure to hold the microphone close to your mouth. This has been known to dramatically improve voice quality on all types of phones, because the microphones are optimized for certain distances between the handset and the source of the sound.

    If you are using a hands-free headset, try positioning the microphone closer to your mouth.

    Note: the presence of a third party product in this article should be not be construed as an endorsement of that product, nor should its absence be considered a denigration. palmOne does not manufacture any third-party products mentioned above, and cannot provide support for them. If you purchase a third-party product and require help with it, contact the manufacturer.

    This support article is an insult.
  5. #45  
    Does anyone know how I can listen to music via Itunes or pocket tunes using the bluetooth headset?
  6. #46  
    I am pretty sure that it will require a different bt 'profile'. Search for this.
    Palm III-->Palm IIIxe-->Palm 505-->Samsung i300-->Treo 600-->PPC 6600-->Treo 650-->Treo 700wx-->BB Pearl--> BB Curve

  7. #47  
    I just upgraded to Treo650 GSM, the call quality is good.
    Kiah Nyame
  8. #48  
    Quote Originally Posted by petemeister
    Well, I have noticed that my Cingular 650 sounds much better through my BT headset. When I use the handset, I still notice a fluttering sound. I have been in three states the past three days and have noticed the same sound issues: Low volume, background noise (more that my T-mobile Treo 600), fluttering and static.

    Will any of the existing hacks fix this or do i have to wait for P1/Cingular? Or return and wait for my unlocked Treo 650? Comments please...
    Hmmm, your headset actually sounds better than the handset? It is the other way around for me. I am using the HBH-660 headset. Either way though I find the quality acceptable on both.
    Last edited by helpermonkey; 02/10/2005 at 05:20 AM.
    Treo 650 GSM
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