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  1.    #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by larry91403
    Yeah and I was able to download the exe to my windoze box. Why isn't there a mac client??? Why is everything all about Outlook???

    But I digress...

    OK - can't use this cause it wants me to sync with my windoze box. I can't even begin to tell you how much that irritates me.
  2. #22  
    Goodguy, you are 100% correct. It's always irked me that Sproqit claims it is secure when it requires every employee to leave a gateway to their computer just waiting for someone to bust open. Blackberry is 100% centralized with IT people looking after it. They can take actions to fix problems. When you rely on your desktop, IT has no idea what's going on.
  3. #23  
    The other plus is remote wipe. A device that is lost or stolen can be remotely erased from within the IT department. Sproqit, from my cursory review, looks like an IT nightmare.
  4. #24  
    Larry- 90% of the world is on PC yet Mac is such a superior product.
    Sorry it does not work for you. Good convo guys I am still a Sproqit fan and think it is more secure then the serve.
  5.    #25  
    I didn't want to admit this but I just installed chattermail....and I actually like it!
  6. #26  
    Port 443 is the web port and always open. Sproqit uses outgoing only also- where are you getting your info from? The nice thing about Port 443 is IT does not have to open it- but it is open
    What is "positive acknowledgement"? And how is that related to store and forward?

    Sproqit is coming out with a server for work groups which will alliviate some of your concerns. Bottom line I am glad there are a bunch competing, we consumers need it.

    Blackberry is very expensive- not sure why. Once I got my Treo I decided to try Sproqit and am content with it- I have not experienced any problems.
  7. #27  
    Guys, Sproqit also has a server version that's being released next month. Unlike Good, Sproqit connects the device directly to the Enterprise rather than sending all the messages through their data center like Good does. If you dont think that is a security risk, you should read this article about the sidekick which has the same security model as Good and Blackberry: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1320155/posts

    Of course, Good doesn't want you to know that they do this, so most of their literature conveniently leaves it out. Furthermore, GoodGuy, I've run test comparing Good and Sproqit back-to-back, and Good has a much longer lag than 5-10 seconds, whereas Sproqit is immediate.
  8. #28  
    Clipfan, if having a NOC is such a security risk, why did the government approve GoodLink and RIM? Secondly, Good uses end-to-end AES encryption, which is much more secure than SSL. SSL has been hacked before. AES has not. Sproqit's own diagram shows a two way connection through the firewall.

    As for your T-Mobile story. It was not the wireless network that got hacked. It was T-Mobile's internal servers that had nothing to do with the wireless network nor the email traveling on that network. It was the user information that was stored on T-Mobile's servers that got compromised. No user information is stored on Good's servers. Be that as it may, in Good's model, the information is encrypted before it hits the NOC, so as it travels through the NOC, it is still encrypted and stays that way until it hits the device. The reverse is true as well. Good is extremely proud of the security model and has never held anything back as it relates to that model. The information on Sproqit's webpage is referring to a pull model where the message is stored on a server until it is retrieved by the device. Since GoodLink is push technology, the traffic hits the NOC and is then immediately sent to the device, not sitting there waiting for a command from the device to get it. The only time it doesn't hit the device is when they (the devices) are out of coverage. This is where positive acknolwdgement comes into play. The NOC sends out a ping to the device to see if it is in coverage. If it is, the email goes. If not, the email is stored, still encrypted. When the device comes back into coverage, the email is sent.

    Sproqit is not an email application. It is a desktop control application, a redirector of sorts. Your desktop is off, you have nothing. You have to have both the Desktop agent open as well as the client running on the device. You close the client, you don't get email. Your desktop crashes, power goes out, anything that causes the Desktop Agent to close, you have nothing. This is not a push email solution. Yes, the features of accessing files and the speed enhancement from being directly connected, at first glance is very appealing. The SDK is also nice to allow futute development. However, there isn't an IT manager in the world that is worth his or her salary that is going to allow an entire enterprise of wireless email users to all have access to their desktops via a handlheld with the ONLY security being a password that he (the IT manager) can't force, only recommend. No fleet management, no IT control (they make it sound like a benefit) over devices, management, monitoring. This application will never fly in the enterprise. Doesn't appear as if their current version is meant to go after that space. If they have a newer version with a different security model (which it sounds like with this server model, they will) and they can still offer the same features, then it will be very interesting to see what happens.

    As for speed, I cannot say I have run Sproqit and GoodLink side by side, but I can tell you I have seen, literally 1000's of emails sent via GoodLink and never have seen a delay that was caused by GoodLink or the NOC. I run GoodLink and my emails hit my device before my inbox 9 out of 10 times and the 10th is literally seconds between when it hits my inbox and then my device.
  9. #29  
    This thread started by asking about Blackberry connect for palm....not Good or Sproqit.

    Please stop the ad campaigns discussing why Good or Sproqit are so much better. If you feel you must discuss that, please start an appropriate thread.

    The fact is, Blackberry servers ARE ALREADY in use in MANY organizations. As a result, MANY people are interested in a client that allows them to use their Treo in conjunction with a BES, instead of the lousy Blackberry hardware options out there.

    So back to the topic at hand....anyone know of a release date?
    "Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen."
    - Albert Einstein
  10. #30  
    agreed. My apologies for getting 100% off topic. Back to the discussions at hand. The release date, IMHO, is not as important as the functionality at this point. All signs are pointing to BBC only offering email support and nothing else (contacts, calendar, etc). The press release announcing BBC was May of last year, but I don't know of anyone (outside maybe beta testers) who has seen it.
  11.    #31  
    Quote Originally Posted by GoodGuy
    agreed. My apologies for getting 100% off topic. Back to the discussions at hand. The release date, IMHO, is not as important as the functionality at this point. All signs are pointing to BBC only offering email support and nothing else (contacts, calendar, etc). The press release announcing BBC was May of last year, but I don't know of anyone (outside maybe beta testers) who has seen it.
    I'll take email only!
  12. #32  
    Email and Calendar would be perfect, contacts are not essential as long as you can lookup against the corp directory.
    "Common sense is the collection of prejudices acquired by age eighteen."
    - Albert Einstein
  13. #33  
    GoodGuy, you are really way off. As a coutesy to Jo, I'll start another thread. But for the record, Sproqit is push not pull and has a server product as well. See you on the other thread.
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