Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1.    #1  
    Could it possible that the now confirmed delay of the GSM version for "mysterious reasons" was caused by PalmOne wanting to upgrade the radio unit to UMTS??

    In a way such a move by PalmOne would make sense as the GSM operators now are rolling out UMTS networks. The Treo 650 GSM with UMTS would be really great for users, but also good for GSM operators as they need smart smartphones in order to create demand for the UMTS technology.

    Quote Originally Posted by specimen38
    So while I had the Director of Product Marketing in front of me I asked him the big question. When can we expect the GSM version of the Treo 650? He said, in the next 1 to 2 months. He clearly [EDIT] wanted to be non-committal to an exact date, but the 2 months was the absolute maximum if unless something else significant transacts to delay it. He then said, "it will be soon and you will see everthing then." The "you will see everything then" was explicitly something he could not say about why there is a delay.
  2. #2  
    No. This would be a very significant change in the radio, require recertification with the FCC, and isn't useful in the U.S. yet.
    Main Phone: Treo 270/600/650/700w/700p/750v/Motorola Q/iPhone
    Tried but sold: Motorola Q/Nokia E61/700wx/HTC TyTN/Treo 680
  3.    #3  
    Maybe, but UMTS is being rolled out by Orange in Europe where the phone is being delayed.
  4. #4  
    true or false, i thought AT&T was testing UMTS in the Seattle (washington state area) last summerish
  5. #5  
    To answer the original question: no, that is not the reason for the delay. PalmOne would be able to add more memory to the 650 easier than changing out the radio.

    To Hofo's comment: True, and they have it rolled out in at least seven markets to date. I know about Dallas, Seattle, I think San Diego and DC. I had a UMTS card back in November for a project we were working on in the Seatlle area.

    The problem with UMTS so far is that coverage (at least in the US) has been confined to major metropolitan areas. You don't even get ubiquitous coverage in those areas and the real problem is that if you don't get UMTS speed, you drop back to GPRS. At this time, no hardware available allows for a step back to EDGE speed.
  6. #6  
    I'm confused. Isn't UTMS the same thing as Cingular's EDGE?
    Newton 120 -> Newton 2000 -> Palm IIIx -> Visor Deluxe -> Visor Prism -> Tungsten T3 -> Treo 650 (Cingular | Unlocked)
    Redford, MI
    cplater AT gmail DOT com
  7. #7  
    no. edge is edge. umts as I understand it (not a gsm expert) is more along the lines of evdo with speeds in the hundreds of kilobits
    Treo 800w 8/08
    Nokia N800
    previously: Treo 700wx 12/06, Sprint 6700 3/06; Treo 650 11/04; Treo 600 1/04 (gone); Samsung i500 (gone); Hitachi G1000 11/03 (gone); Nokia 7110 5/00(best phone ever)
  8. #8  
    as I understand it
    UMTS- is part of the future w-CDMA roll out

    sprint/ verizon's CDMA radio net is better for smartphones, but a more expensive infrastructure to build

    w-CDMA improves on that and will replace GSM as we know it

    GSM was chosen because it was cheaper to set up and since many foreign Tel-co's
    were subsidized by their Govt's, price WAS a factor

    so when UTMS comes out, you will need a NEW treo (700, 750?)
  9. #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by cplater
    I'm confused. Isn't UTMS the same thing as Cingular's EDGE?
    Think of EDGE as 2.75G technology versus UMTS which is considered 3G (third generation). EDGE has a theoretical max bandwidth on the order of 384kbps versus 2Mbps for UMTS once fully implemented. EDGE is pretty much the same as GPRS except it gets better spectral efficiency with a different modulation scheme, hence higher data rate. UMTS changes are far more substantial.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by TreoBeard
    To Hofo's comment: True, and they have it rolled out in at least seven markets to date. I know about Dallas, Seattle, I think San Diego and DC. I had a UMTS card back in November for a project we were working on in the Seatlle area.
    Hey TreoBeard,

    Were you using the AT&T network? How was the UMTS service? Any problems?

    I was a junior hardware engineer at Nortel Networks when I worked on the main baseband processor card for Nortel's UMTS basestations back in 2001. There were some unresolved issues with our card when they laid off my entire group. I'm curious as to whether they were ever fixed.
  11. Minsc's Avatar
    Posts
    967 Posts
    Global Posts
    974 Global Posts
    #11  
    Are there even any UMTS phones available?
  12. #12  
    There are dozens of UMTS capable phones available mostly in Asia and Europe. Just none of them are Treos

Posting Permissions