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  1.    #1  
    Does anyone know what the SAR rating is for the Treo 650 GSM?

    Seen a couple of number over 1.2 or so. Isn't that kind of high, considering now many phones are under 0.5.

    Just wondering if anyone has any concerns of high SAR rating for the Treo.

    Thanks
  2. #2  
    I personally think the evidence is still up in the air on the SAR topic. I use headsets most of the time though. I remember when the rumors surfaced that wired headsets actually channeled more of the radiation directly to the ear.
  3.    #3  
    Yes I have been told that as well, regarding headsets being even worst!!!

    Someone even told me they read its not recommended to carry phone in the front pocket, especially for men, around the groin area. Cause for concern :P

    Anyways, i've had the Treo 600 for about 1 yr, so i guess its too late. Was hoping they would improve and lower the SAR rating for Treo 650.
  4. #4  
    As long as I don't drop calls, I don't care. Everything gives you cancer these days. Just use a handsfree headset as much as you can, and you should be fine.
  5. wahili's Avatar
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    #5  
    speakerphone.
  6. #6  
    The radio frequencies that are used for cellular phones can't give you cancer. Cancer is the result of damage to your DNA. And DNA is rather sturdy. And replication is a tightly controlled process involving many highly specific proteins with many checks and balances, and repair mechanisms.
    Damage typically results from EM radiation with a wavelength in the UV range or smaller (ie higher energy). And the damage that results depends on the wavelength. UV produces pyrimidine dimers which mess up the replication process. X-ray and higher (ionizing radiation) will produce breaks in the phosphate backbone. High energy radiation (again UV or higher) could produce ionized radicals which could interfere with your DNA replication.
    BUT Radio frequencies are way longer (ie lower energy) and can't even knock an electron out of its quantum level. At best they could vibrate molecules, which just means increasing the temperature of the system slightly. Not produce permanent damage to you genetic code.
    Most of the studies that show a link had major experimental flaws, or results that were not statistically significant.

    Bottom line: Don't worry about a cell phone giving you cancer. Worry about that McDonalds you just ate giving you a coronary.
  7. #7  
    sentinal10 - Physicist, Engineer, or Doctor?
  8. #8  
    Molecular Biologist in Medical School.
    My CV

    BA in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Boston University
    MA in Biotechnology, Boston University

    Currently
    2nd year Medical Student at the University of Rochester
  9. 1SFG's Avatar
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    #9  
    that it won't cause your gas tank to explode either. Scientifically squashed urban legend.
    1st SFG (A)

    if at first you don't succeed - RELOAD!
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by sentinal10
    The radio frequencies that are used for cellular phones can't give you cancer. Cancer is the result of damage to your DNA. And DNA is rather sturdy. And replication is a tightly controlled process involving many highly specific proteins with many checks and balances, and repair mechanisms.
    Damage typically results from EM radiation with a wavelength in the UV range or smaller (ie higher energy). And the damage that results depends on the wavelength. UV produces pyrimidine dimers which mess up the replication process. X-ray and higher (ionizing radiation) will produce breaks in the phosphate backbone. High energy radiation (again UV or higher) could produce ionized radicals which could interfere with your DNA replication.
    BUT Radio frequencies are way longer (ie lower energy) and can't even knock an electron out of its quantum level. At best they could vibrate molecules, which just means increasing the temperature of the system slightly. Not produce permanent damage to you genetic code.
    Most of the studies that show a link had major experimental flaws, or results that were not statistically significant.

    Bottom line: Don't worry about a cell phone giving you cancer. Worry about that McDonalds you just ate giving you a coronary.
    Sentinal10, your Radio Frequency explanation is the best that I have ever heard. Thanks for such detailed info.

    However, don't cell phones still emit some EM radiations that may damage your DNA? Just curious.
    Pager > Nokia ???? > Nextel i1000 > Nextel i1000 plus > T-Mobile Sidekick (B&W) > Nokia 3650 > Treo 650 GSM Cingular - Bought via TreoCentral (Feb 2005)
  11. #11  
    Quote Originally Posted by sentinal10
    Molecular Biologist in Medical School.
    My CV

    BA in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Boston University
    MA in Biotechnology, Boston University

    Currently
    2nd year Medical Student at the University of Rochester

    "Let me control the nation's money and I care not who makes its laws." -****** ******
  12. #12  
    Quote Originally Posted by techjunkie
    However, don't cell phones still emit some EM radiations that may damage your DNA? Just curious.
    I can't think of a way that they could. Cell phones, radio towers, etc produce EM radiation (radio signals) by accelerating electrons up and down a wire or antenna. As the electron moves it generates an EM wave. Remember moving charged particles produce a magnetic field with an electric field orthoganal to the magnetic field. This process is fairly limited as to what frequencies it can produce. I think microwaves would probably be shortest easily generated signal. (electrical engineers and physicists feel free to correct me on that one)

    To produce higher energy EM radiation you need to do something different. For example heat a wire by running current through high resistance. As the wire heats you get a sort of a standard distribution of EM radiation with the mean output being determined by the temperature. This is how a lightbulb works.

    If you get an object hot enough you could produce all kinds of damaging radiation. The sun outputs mostly visible light but the tail end of the standard distribution explains why we also get UV from the sun.

    Other ways are to put a charge through a gas. If you add enough electrical energy to a system eventually you excite the electrons into higher energy quantum states. As they fall back to their ground state they give off the energy as photons of light. This is how fluorescent lights work. By the way those flurescent lights actually produce UV light that is then absorbed by the coating on the inside of the bulb. The coating then re-emits light in the visible spectrum.

    For really high energy stuff like x-rays you can shoot an electron gun at a plate of metal. And higher stuff gamma rays etc I would probably have to go for certain radioactive compounds.

    But in anycase i'm fairly sure that cell phones produce EM radiation limited to the radio frequencies.

    If you ever see your cell phone antenna start glowing like a lightbulb and shift through the visible spectrum past blue and purple...
    1. get very far away from the phone.
    2. go talk to a professional and tell them you are having visual halucinations.

    But seriously I can't think of a way that a cell phone could produce radiation of a wavelength short enough to cause damage.

    But I would be interested if someone with more knowledge of radio signal production could chime in on this one.
  13. #13  
    Discussed here.

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