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  1. #21  
    Ghileman,

    Fact! The sfbacell.com site needs updating. However, that should not cause us to disregard its value as it specifies some significant infrastructure facts & details about the Bay Area's wireless networks that are in place today. You can't deny that. I am an AT&T guy, but the objective and subjective data points to Verizon as having the best infrastructure in the Bay Area to support the Treo 650. Stu/Spsims gets it.

    Quote Originally Posted by spsims
    MC2714 asked about several things...

    First, if he's on AT&T's old TDMA service he will be forced to change phones and service in the next year or two. AT&T (and Cingular) are dropping their TDMA coverage entirely - in favor of GSM. During the transition, AT&T has essentially half the bandwidth it would normally have. Half for TDMA and half for GSM. It's much more complicated than that, but that the simple explanation. Because the TDMA to GSM transistion areas have some/half their bandwidth is tied up on the "other" system AT&T customers in those areas see a lot of "drops", poor call quality, etc. That will slowly improve over the next year or so as AT&T/Cingular converts the rest of the TDMA customers to GSM.

    Second issue in the Bay Area. Cingular and T-Mobile used to share the 1900Mhz band. Cingular bought ATTWS and has to divest the 1900mhz frequencies they were sharing with T-Mobile in CA, NV, NY and some other areas. That transition apparently starts on Nov 15th - which will drop more Cingular people on to the old ATTWS frequencies. T-Mobile users should see less congestion and better data rates as bandwidth opens up on their side.

    The net/net of all this is that I believe Cingular/ATTWS users are going to suffer even more in the SF Bay area for the next few months.

    Your best coverage in the SF Bay area is going to be Verizon (800Mhz), followed by Sprint (1900Mhz).

    If it were me buying a new Treo 650 on a new service plan, I'd get the Sprint Treo 650 because they have a good data plan, decent rates, and excellent nationwide roaming. Best of all, both Sprint & Verizon are CDMA and Sprint has an option called Free & Clear America that allows you use both Sprint's network and Verizon's network without paying tons of roaming charges. The only thing you lose is Verizon's analog coverage in the boonies, but the Treo doesn't do analog anyway - so analog is a moot point.

    My two cents....

    Stu
    Last edited by specimen38; 11/12/2004 at 10:40 AM.
  2.    #22  
    thanks to everyone for their good feedback on SF. Very helpful!!
  3. Iceman6's Avatar
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    #23  
    The EVDO revolution begins in January, when you can start buying EVDO service from Verizon for a phone (as opposed to a laptop card). I don't know about you, but I'm not buying a new phone until I find out what the EVDO rollout schedule is for my neck of the woods.
  4. #24  
    Yeah,

    Unfortunately, EVDO won't reach the Treo 650 until the next generation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman6
    The EVDO revolution begins in January, when you can start buying EVDO service from Verizon for a phone (as opposed to a laptop card). I don't know about you, but I'm not buying a new phone until I find out what the EVDO rollout schedule is for my neck of the woods.
  5. #25  
    AT&T is offering UMTS now. It's been around for more than a year in the Bay Area. Data speeds above 300-500 kps. Punch in your Zip Code at the link below.

    http://www.attwireless.com/umts/coverage.html

    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman6
    The EVDO revolution begins in January, when you can start buying EVDO service from Verizon for a phone (as opposed to a laptop card). I don't know about you, but I'm not buying a new phone until I find out what the EVDO rollout schedule is for my neck of the woods.
  6. #26  
    Quote Originally Posted by oldtimetechie
    Get Sprint w/ plan that has unlimited roaming and you'll have Verizon anywhere its a much stronger signal than Sprint.
    Let me make sure I understand this - First, I assume the Verizon network doesn't just "kick-in" whenver you lose a signal, only when you go "off the reservation", correct?

    Here is the description of the $5/month Sprint add-on for free-roaming (from Amazon's plan page):

    "PCS Free & Clear America: Free Off-Network Roaming on included minutes: Receive additional off-network roaming minutes for use when traveling off the digital PCS Nationwide Network. Additional per-minute charges apply for domestic long-distance calling."

    This suggests they give you free roaming (on Verizon's network, I assume) when you travel "off the reservation" but charge you for long distance (which would be most of the calls, when you travel). I suppose the answer is "yes, they charge you, but you wouldn't have a signal otherwise." Does this sound right?
  7. #27  
    Thanks, all, for helpful feedback (especially SPSIMS).

    I managed to answer one of my own questions-- 'how do I tell if I'm currently on GMS or the AT&T legacy network?', uhhh, READ YOUR DAMNED MANUAL, BONEHEAD! Since I discovered that I am NOT using GMS now, my good experience to date with AT&T is pretty much meaningless. Everything points to Sprint for me at this point...
  8. #28  
    see attachment

    Verizon is not the low price leader. Verizon's rates, if you go just by peak minutes, are the highest (at least on the national plans). But if mobile to mobile minutes are useful to you (friends, family, and colleagues also using Verizon) then Verizon's rates are competitive. The negatives about Verizon are 1) no international roaming (except South Korea, Canada, Mexico), and Sprint has a better selection of CDMA phones. If you are choosing a regional plan then AT&T and Verizon are almost tied, but I'd still give the edge to Verizon because of their better selection of phones (as well as their data capability).
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