Page 93 of 133 FirstFirst ... 43838889909192939495969798103 ... LastLast
Results 1,841 to 1,860 of 2657
  1. #1841  
    edited out b/c I'm confusing people. sry.
    Last edited by Tanner; 01/23/2005 at 08:26 PM. Reason: edited out b/c I'm confusing people. sry.
  2. #1842  
    Phones are quite expensive (most $100-$200+) http://www.metropcs.com/services/brand-all.shtml

    Additional Extras on the $35 plan:
    UNLIMITED LOCAL CALLING only (local within the very small coverage area),
    Call Fwd: $5/month
    Picture Msgs: $5/month
    Voicemail & CallerID (basic): $3/month, "advanced" $5/month
    Text Messages: $3/month
    You are Charged for calls made to people out of the (very local) calling area.

    If you take the $45/month plan most of that is included (except call forwarding which I use quite a bit). So now you're paying $45 month not $35 but you STILL have one MAJOR NEGATIVE .... you can't leave your local area and be able to use the phone.

    The "no contract" MODEL is great in theory, but in practice, for MetroPCS you are very limited .... if that's all you need, it's not bad.

    I'd still rather do a "no-contract" from Cingular, Verizon or Sprint after finding a cheap phone on ebay (or even a 1yr contract to be able to get all the promos).

    Also, if you think about it (and if you need more then one line) for $70 (which would be the same $35/month each) you can get 2 lines from Cing or even Verizon with all the extras (but with a 1yr contract) including nationwide calling in and out at no charge.

    Quote Originally Posted by specimen38
    Actually they don't nickel and dime you to death. It more like penny and nickel you to death. Sprint and Cingular nickel, dime and quarter you to death, especially Sprint. I have a Metropcs on one phone and it is truly for me $35/mo + tax. No contract. The "no contract" thing is awesome and eventually we will all succomb. The networks are honesty better than ATT networks in the SF Bay.
    Last edited by MisterEd; 01/23/2005 at 01:13 PM.
  3. #1843  
    Answer already posted. CLICK HERE

    HE'S WRONG. Totally. You dont believe me?

    Edit: Keep your 32K UNLESS you have an ENS phone (even then I'd keep it).

    Quote Originally Posted by Tanner
    Monkies, specimen, others... Could you comment on this? any experience w/ this bit I got? It makes "marketing" sense to tell a customer, you'll get better reception w/ this one... heck, if I believed that I'd have one, wouldn't you? Just wanna know before I lose my old one...
    Last edited by MisterEd; 01/23/2005 at 01:23 PM.
  4. #1844  
    Quote Originally Posted by Tanner
    Monkies, specimen, others... Could you comment on this? any experience w/ this bit I got? It makes "marketing" sense to tell a customer, you'll get better reception w/ this one... heck, if I believed that I'd have one, wouldn't you? Just wanna know before I lose my old one...

    "He said that he's keeping his 32K SIM b/c Cingular told him it's a new way to lock down the useage of a SIM card to a specific phone. "
    Tanner, I am a little unsure of what that post means, that I why I did not comment. Did they tell you the 64K SIM would only work in a specific phone? Possibly meaning the phone it came with? If I am correct in assuming that, I would say it is not true. I could be wrong, but I have yet to hear that, and it does not even make sense. Sounds like a misinformed person, or simply someone who was confused.
  5. #1845  
    actually SIM CDMA phones project has been in the works for a while. On the Nokia 6225 released by Bell Mobility, there is a "SIM" holder. However the port has been disabled so whatever you put there wont work.

    In CDMA they will be called RUIM
    Here is a story:
    http://www.mobile.commerce.net/story.php?story_id=1308

    and here is a pic from the Nokia 6225 inside:
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v7...fo/CDMASIM.jpg

    btw you can scream now
  6. #1846  
    Quote Originally Posted by hofo_mofo
    actually SIM CDMA phones project has been in the works for a while. On the Nokia 6225 released by Bell Mobility, there is a "SIM" holder. However the port has been disabled so whatever you put there wont work.

    In CDMA they will be called RUIM
    Here is a story:
    http://www.mobile.commerce.net/story.php?story_id=1308

    and here is a pic from the Nokia 6225 inside:
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v7...fo/CDMASIM.jpg

    btw you can scream now
    That is a good idea but not quite what I had in mind. The RUIM permits the personalization to be placed on a chip and moved from CDMA phone to CDMA phone. What I was thinking of was a chip that could be placed in a GSM phone and permit it to be used on a CDMA network.

    (I have a SIM that permits me to receive calls to my Sprint number to be received on a GSM phone and network to charge calls made on a GSM phone and network to be charged to my Sprint Account.)
  7. #1847  
    yeah i know my bad

    but i was doing this at this line; Imagine a CDMA/PCS SIM.



    thats cool what sprint offers you; but the charges must be out of this world

    we're lucky...there is solid coverage from coast to coast, whereever there are people..ie 93% of the populated zones have signal...that 7% is in the void
  8. #1848  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    What I was thinking of was a chip that could be placed in a GSM phone and permit it to be used on a CDMA network.
    That is impossible, as you probably already know. It does remind me of what I know to be called GATE phones Seimens made some and the SOny Ericsson T62U was supposed to be one too (I have a GS only T62U). Those phones could work on eiter GSM or TDMA. They had to switch between networks when camping and as far as I know only on one carrier - I guess you could get a GSM SIMfrom one carrier and activate the TDMA part on another carrier if the phone was not locked.
  9. #1849  
    Quote Originally Posted by noahs
    That is actually not accurate. When Cingular introduced their 64k "smart SIM", they enabled a feature called Enhanced Network Selection (ENS). If your phone supports ENS and you have a 64k SIM card, then the old model of network selection (as helpermonkey describes) is supplanted by a more intelligent system.

    While non-ENS phones/SIMs had a single home network that the phone would always prefer, ENS uses "load balancing" between both the blue and orange networks. Essentially, ENS examines the load on blue and orange and selects the network that is the least overloaded. This system is much better for Cingular, so they can more efficiently manage their spectrum capacity while they work to physically merge blue and orange over the next two years. ENS is essentially an interim solution. Once the two networks become one, it will become unecessary.

    For some users, ENS has a side benefit of selecting a better signal. While non-ENS phones would always try to lock onto the home network no matter what (blue or orange, depending on what service you have), ENS phones will freely switch between the two. In some areas, for example, the orange signal is weak but your phone locks onto an almost unusable signal. ENS makes it less likely this will occur. As far as I understand it, the network switching is based on load balancing (which network has the fewest number of active connections) as opposed to signal balancing (which network has the strongest signal). That said, it's a good thing to be on a less congested network, as congestion impacts the quality of your connections, dropped calls, busy signals, etc.

    They key, however, is that you must *both* have a 64k SIM and a phone that supports ENS. 64k SIM cards are backward compatible with non-ENS phones, but they obviously won't use ENS. So, if you put a 64k SIM in a 600 (which is not ENS capable), it will work exactly the same as a 32k SIM.

    Cingular is shipping most new phones with ENS enabled in the firmware, so one would think since palmOne is customizing each model to the particular needs of the carrier that the 650 would support ENS. However, I haven't seen any confirmation one way or the other on this, so I guess we'll just have to wait and see once the Cingular 650's start shipping.

    For a more in-depth discussion of ENS and 64k SIMs, see this thread on HoFo:

    http://howardforums.com/showthread.p...hreadid=492681
    noahs, after talking with Kilo, the starter of the tread you posted the link to, I am quite sure I understand the feature the same way he does (in general anyway) and I am quite sure that I am correct . I am not going to say my explanation might not be misunderstood, but I do know doubt my understanding of ENS or the 64K SIM. It is simply for changing your home network as I stated. If I find info that corrects me or anything like that I will post it.
  10. #1850  
    Quote Originally Posted by helpermonkey
    That is impossible, as you probably already know.
    Right. It ranks with the 650 GSM. Both seem to require more than a little magic. Actually, the easiest place to converge the networks is in the handset.
  11. #1851  
    Quote Originally Posted by hofo_mofo
    yeah i know my bad

    but i was doing this at this line; Imagine a CDMA/PCS SIM.



    thats cool what sprint offers you; but the charges must be out of this world

    we're lucky...there is solid coverage from coast to coast, whereever there are people..ie 93% of the populated zones have signal...that 7% is in the void
    It is about as bad as it gets but not as bad as it used to be. In addition to paying about the worst international roaming rates, one also has to have a GSM phone.
  12. #1852  
    Looks like we have past the 1850 hurdle and will clearly top 2000 before the 650 GSM is real. I am still worried about 5000.
  13. #1854  
    Quote Originally Posted by helpermonkey
    Do you know of any links to official documentation on ENS? I would like to see them if you do, like white papers or whatever. Something other than a discussion is what I am looking for. I will look on Google, but so far I just see forum links.

    I am reading the first posts in that thread and there are what I believe to be errors in the first post about how the phone even behaves under normal conditions. So it is not doing much to convince me that I am wrong as of yet.

    According to your description of ENS, the phone selects the less congested network? Or is it the network telling the phone? There is no way for the phone to know which network is loaded more.

    edit:

    Another question, does anyone know the kind of processing power that would be required for the netowrk to keep track of the load balance and then switch users from one home network to another, on the fly, in a market with say 1- 2 million subscribers? Maybe I am thinking about it wrong, but it seems like a lot of resources are going to get eaten up to do something that doesn't really need to be done - that being switch between networks on the fly. Why is it even necessary to do that? The orange and the blue customers were doing relatively fine before the two companies became one. I could go into a bunch of other reasons this would be difficult and pointless to do on the fly.

    Once again ENS is for load balancing, but a user should only need tobe switched from one network to another once and a while if not only once.

    Also, why are people reporting having there phone's network preference changed from orange to blue and vice versa after their complaining to customer service (usually at a higher level than basic service)?
    Perhaps we are talking past one another. ENS uses load balancing to select the home network between blue and orange. It does not use this to switch you between cell sites during a call, as that requires physical handoffs between the sites that do not exist yet.

    As for calling customer service to change your home network, this can be done with either a 32k SIM card or a 64k SIM card. They can send you an OTA update that will manually change your home network in the list of the SIM, and for anyone who finds superior coverage where they live on one network or the other, it makes sense to have it set as your home network regardless of what SIM you have.

    Here's an explanation of ENS from a news article:

    Besides this overall improvement, Roger Entner, a wireless analyst with The Yankee Group in Boston, said Cingular will further improve coverage for some customers on both carrier's networks through a load-balancing technology.

    Starting in about two months, customers getting new phones or upgraded service plans will get a new subscriber identity chip for their handsets. At the same time, the carrier will activate new technology that identifies -- within each of 47,000 cell sites -- the available calling capacity on the former AT&T and Cingular networks. The new chips and technology upgrade will electronically steer subscribers toward whichever network has more capacity, improving overall coverage and reducing all-circuits-busy error messages.

    "Your network experience will improve," Entner said.

    http://www.rednova.com/news/display/?id=97411
  14. #1855  
    Quote Originally Posted by noahs
    Perhaps we are talking past one another.
    Yes I think you are right.

    Quote Originally Posted by noahs
    Here's an explanation of ENS from a news article:

    Besides this overall improvement, Roger Entner, a wireless analyst with The Yankee Group in Boston, said Cingular will further improve coverage for some customers on both carrier's networks through a load-balancing technology.

    Starting in about two months, customers getting new phones or upgraded service plans will get a new subscriber identity chip for their handsets. At the same time, the carrier will activate new technology that identifies -- within each of 47,000 cell sites -- the available calling capacity on the former AT&T and Cingular networks. The new chips and technology upgrade will electronically steer subscribers toward whichever network has more capacity, improving overall coverage and reducing all-circuits-busy error messages.

    "Your network experience will improve," Entner said.

    http://www.rednova.com/news/display/?id=97411
    The part I quoted and made bold is the part I don't understand. It could be right, but I sure haven't heard anything about it (and if it is going to get done I should be one of the people hearing about it). It still sounds fishy to me. There is no nead to do this dynamicly. Someone can watch over capacity levels from the office (not in real time - it is not necessary because if capacity is that bad you have botched up your network big time anyway) and from decisions they make you could just decide to push people from one network to the other. If both netowrks are being cared for properly, switching people over in real time would never be needed. You would just be switching in emergency sitiuations (or to prevent emergencies from happening), or you would be migrating people, hopefully permanently, from one netowrk to the other. This is my logic (I am not saying I could not be worng).

    What is your take on my explination? Maybe you are seeing something I am missing?
  15. #1856  
    Quote Originally Posted by whmurray
    Looks like we have past the 1850 hurdle and will clearly top 2000 before the 650 GSM is real. I am still worried about 5000.
    At the rate we are posting I don't expect the Treo to be released before we hit 2000 posts, that is for sure. That will probably be tomorrow... I hope you are wrong about the 5000 posts though. People will be rioting in the streets for GSM 650s
  16. #1857  
    Quote Originally Posted by helpermonkey
    Yes I think you are right.



    The part I quoted and made bold is the part I don't understand. It could be right, but I sure haven't heard anything about it (and if it is going to get done I should be one of the people hearing about it). It still sounds fishy to me. There is no nead to do this dynamicly. Someone can watch over capacity levels from the office (not in real time - it is not necessary because if capacity is that bad you have botched up your network big time anyway) and from decisions they make you could just decide to push people from one network to the other. If both netowrks are being cared for properly, switching people over in real time would never be needed. You would just be switching in emergency sitiuations (or to prevent emergencies from happening), or you would be migrating people, hopefully permanently, from one netowrk to the other. This is my logic (I am not saying I could not be worng).

    What is your take on my explination? Maybe you are seeing something I am missing?
    I think your logic makes some sense, but I also think you're missing the fact that the networks are vastly different in different parts of the country. While blue may have sufficient spectrum capacity in one area, orange may be running up against their spectrum limits there (and vice-versa in different areas of the country). However, without ENS there was no way for the carriers to dynamically change customers' home networks as they travelled from region to region.

    The best way to resolve these spectrum issues inherited from the AT&T merger is to merge the networks completely, but this is not a trivial process. According to Cingular's timetables, the network merger will be done one region at a time, and they will also be upgrading their technology in each region to UMTS/HSDPA as they merge. All together, the process is not expected to be completed before the second half of 2006. See here: http://media.corporate-ir.net/media_...104_Slides.pdf

    So, ENS is the stopgap solution to most efficiently use their available spectrum on two independent networks until they become one.
  17. #1858  
    Quote Originally Posted by MisterEd
    As I posted in my previous message you can still buy "Blue" minute plans, "blue" data plans, "blue" phones and "blue" sims from both Amazon and Cing/ATT B2B. Now if the "Blue sim" doesn't put you on the old ATT network, then I stand corrected (and the fellow offering to set it up at the B2B number is lieing). I didn't ask, he volunteered that I'd be better off (plan wise) to get 650's on the "blue side" and gave me the choice of a blue or orange 650.
    Do you know if I would get a discount on a T650 for signing up with AT&T for a 1 year contract?
  18. #1859  
    Quote Originally Posted by noahs
    I think your logic makes some sense, but I also think you're missing the fact that the networks are vastly different in different parts of the country. While blue may have sufficient spectrum capacity in one area, orange may be running up against their spectrum limits there (and vice-versa in different areas of the country). However, without ENS there was no way for the carriers to dynamically change customers' home networks as they travelled from region to region.

    The best way to resolve these spectrum issues inherited from the AT&T merger is to merge the networks completely, but this is not a trivial process. According to Cingular's timetables, the network merger will be done one region at a time, and they will also be upgrading their technology in each region to UMTS/HSDPA as they merge. All together, the process is not expected to be completed before the second half of 2006. See here: http://media.corporate-ir.net/media_...104_Slides.pdf

    So, ENS is the stopgap solution to most efficiently use their available spectrum on two independent networks until they become one.
    Ok, good points. I will have to look into it further... but I don't see users traveling from region to region being the cause of much of a capacity issue for a market of any real size. With a market of say 500K - 1M subscribers, it seems that people traveling from other markets will have only a small impact. Once again, if the capacity is being managed properly, it should not be an issue. As you mentioned in a network that one side - blue or orange - is strapped for capacity due to radio limitations, transport, switching or spectrum, then you should load the other netowrk up right away and start resolving the capacity problems imediatly. If this is done, there will be no need to bounce people from orange to blue or vice versa. It seems like a temporary solution, not something you would want to do over and over again.

    There should be no real spectrum problems resulting from the merger, in fact the merger should result in more than enough spectrum (for most markets anyway). Allowing or an easier upgrade to UMTS.

    I don't think the networks will be merged one region at a time though. This would mean it would take several years to merge the netowrks, and that is not Cingular's timetable. Was that in the pdf you linked to some place? I did not read all of it yet but I did read Ralph de la Vega's part of the presentation - I figured since he is the Cheif Operation Officer, if it wasn't there it wouldn't be in the rest of it.

    As it mentions the top 15 or 20 markets will see UMTS launches this year as UMTS is overlaid onto their existing GSM and TDMA (and analog if present) networks. The remaining markets will see UMTS deployment in 2006.

    And yes ENS is just a stopgap to make the GSM network integrations as seemless to the end user as possible.

    How did you find that presentation btw?
  19. #1860  
    Quote Originally Posted by MacUser
    Do you know if I would get a discount on a T650 for signing up with AT&T for a 1 year contract?
    look back a few pages, someone already listed discount pricing for one of the Cingular sides...

Posting Permissions