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  1.    #141  
    You said it, spec. We're definitely in lots of good company.
    Pager > Nokia ???? > Nextel i1000 > Nextel i1000 plus > T-Mobile Sidekick (B&W) > Nokia 3650 > Treo 650 GSM Cingular - Bought via TreoCentral (Feb 2005)
  2. #142  
    How do you start a poll in here? Or perhaps it has already been done
  3.    #143  
    Just start a new thread. Then check the Poll option.
    Pager > Nokia ???? > Nextel i1000 > Nextel i1000 plus > T-Mobile Sidekick (B&W) > Nokia 3650 > Treo 650 GSM Cingular - Bought via TreoCentral (Feb 2005)
  4. #144  
    I'll do a search to see if one exist already. Then try it.
  5. #145  
    I'm staying with Tmo all the way!!! My favorite thing with T-Mobile is that while I am listening to a voicemail, I can tap 88 to automatically return the call. This saves me time and headache of searching for number or writing it down. Do any other carriers offer this feature?

    To the person who asked about if voice AND data on foreign local sims, I know that if u r in china, You can get CHINA MOBILE M-ZONE Card for voice/gprs/sms/mms
  6. #146  
    Quote Originally Posted by specimen38
    Thanks for the dialogue about 4 post up. Good reading for me.

    Specifically, the necessity for Verizon and Sprint to merge now that Cingular and AT&T have joined which ostensibly includes TMobile as well.

    I still have a question though. Understandingly, WCDMA in the U.S. is not a world standard compatible with European GSM. Does a Verizon/Sprint merger have the potential to support a world standard? Perhaps you said and I misinterpreted it, but Verizon and Sprint don't seem very concerned about Europe and the Far East.
    My comments are based on speculation. Clearly the industry moves in ways that are not always logical. The carriers want to lock a customer to them. This is an opposite motivation from interoperability and universal standards. Universal standards work in favor of phone manufacturers and users. In addition, the phone carriers consider themselves the customer of the phone manufacturer, not the user. It all becomes an confusing mess...

    What should happen, but won't, is that all of the CDMA carriers in the US, Canada, and Korea need to work out common issues so handsets work in all markets. Then the GSM camp and the CDMA camp need to meet and find a way that the next generation of CDMA2000 and WCDMA (advanced GSM) will merge into a mutual standard. Then all of the carriers need to update their networks to the new standard. If this happend, it would probably take years, but in the end we all would benefit. There would still be differences geographically due to local laws and the specific spectrum licensed, but with quad band phones, this is not a real problem.

    Of course it won't happen since all of the carriers seem to be working to not be interoperable and to differentiate themselves even more, but it is a nice dream.

    Verizon does not worry about Europe or the Far East as their minority investory has that covered (Vodaphone). In the long run, the CDMA/GSM phones (one on the market from Samsung) solves their interoperability issues.

    SprintPCS is isolated as a US company.
  7. #147  
    Quote Originally Posted by specimen38

    ".....buyout of Verizon Wireless by Vodaphone and eventual adoption of WCDMA as their GSM varient in Europe" This would apparently need to be a 1900 mhz varient in order expand market share for Verizon.
    Not really. Verizon has a mixed network, mostly at 800 mhz. SprintPCS is at 1900mhz only. A future Quadband GSM varient of WCDMA would solve those problems. Of course that is the future planned for Cingular.

    As mentioned elseware, CDMA2000 and WCDMA are similar but different enough to require different support software in the handset. I would hope that they could merge in future versions. That is of course a pipe dream.
  8. #148  
    Quote Originally Posted by Smartphone Fan
    My comments are based on speculation. Clearly the industry moves in ways that are not always logical.
    Ha ha ha, isn't that the truth. Point in case: AWS

    Quote Originally Posted by specimen38
    Specifically, the necessity for Verizon and Sprint to merge now that Cingular and AT&T have joined which ostensibly includes TMobile as well.
    Sprint may be insulated for some time, I see Verizon absorbing AllTell or US Cellular first, IMHO. Sprint has a landline compnay backing them, plus several MVNO's (Mobile Virtual Network Operator) as cash cows such as Virgin and ATT has announced that they will launch an MVNO on Sprint PCS after AWS is dissolved. Sprint landline will want to continue to offer bundled wireline and wireless services, expecially to big business.

    Quote Originally Posted by specimen38
    I wish the Treo came in any color for any carrier. I hope I am not whinning either. However, black is my favorite also.
    me too

    Quote Originally Posted by specimen38
    Understandingly, WCDMA in the U.S. is not a world standard compatible with European GSM.
    Actually, the WCDMA used in the USA is just as much the global standard as the WCDMA used in Asia, Europe, and Australia. Just as in USA GSM, the frequencies are different but the technology, the air-interface is the same. The only oddball when it comes to WCDMA is NTT's FOMA because it is an earlier release.

    Quote Originally Posted by specimen38
    Does a Verizon/Sprint merger have the potential to support a world standard? Perhaps you said and I misinterpreted it, but Verizon and Sprint don't seem very concerned about Europe and the Far East.
    No, they are using a minority technology, CDMA2000. Remember though, CDMA2k is a domestic technology. Furthermore, CDMA2k is alive an well in S. Korea, Japan, Australia, SE Asia, and in N. and S. America. But its actually a smattering when compared to GSM and the GSM upgrade path to WCDMA account for 80 percent of cellular subscribers. Actually though CDMA2k has begun to be implemented in many rural areas of Europe and Asia on the old NMT (analog) 450 mHz frequency. Interesting development. EVen if all the CDMA2k companies got together and used the same technology on the same frequency, they would still only have 20% of the world, hardly a standard.

    HOWEVER, they are not worried because the fact is most people stay close to home and use whatever technology fits them best. There's a lot of hoopla about a 4g technology called WiMax that may provide a global standard, but who knows. A true global standard will require governmental legislation mandating only one technology, or else a free market will allow for multiple technologies to grow. I mean, EU countries all mandated GSM, so 900 and 1800 are GSM, but now they are starting to adopt CDMA2k on the 450 which is not governed by law.

    All that said, look to the USA to become a major development area in wireless. Currently, we use 850 mHz and 1900 mHz. In 2007, 1700 mHz and 2100 mHz will be auctioned off. That will be 4 spectrum blocks used here. Now, globally in various areas 450, 850, 900, 1700, 1800, 1900, and 2100 are used. So, the USA will have 4 of the major spectrum blocks open for traffic, so it is possible that global handsets will be much easier to come across.
    La Vie En Diaspora: Enfin, une émission qui raconte votre vie aux Etats-Unis

    Treo 600 in December '03, Treo 650 in February '05, HTC TyTN Pro in August '06, and back to Treo 750 in January '07, find me at MyTreo.net

    About me: story of the 100thMonkey
  9. #149  
    Quote Originally Posted by Smartphone Fan
    A future Quadband GSM varient of WCDMA would solve those problems. Of course that is the future planned for Cingular
    Quadband WCDMA? I know that globally, 2100 is the main frequency. Here AWS's markets are currently on 1900 and Cingular has issued an equipment request for WCMDA 850 that we may see a few years, but what is the fourth frequency that WCDMA will run on?
    La Vie En Diaspora: Enfin, une émission qui raconte votre vie aux Etats-Unis

    Treo 600 in December '03, Treo 650 in February '05, HTC TyTN Pro in August '06, and back to Treo 750 in January '07, find me at MyTreo.net

    About me: story of the 100thMonkey
  10. #150  
    Eventhough both systems are Code-Division based. Cdma2000 is still much better than Wcdma. Cdma2000 is much more spectrally efficient than Wcdma and is also backwards compatible and cheaper to deploy. Wcdma techs are still having a hard time with getting GSM/GPRS as a seemless fallback for UTMS. Cdma2000/EvDo/EvDv will always be a few steps ahead of UTMS.

    Personally, I prefer GSM over CDMA currently because of voice quality, Sim cards, and being the World Standard. Once UTMS takes over, voice quality will drop and superior battery life will dissappear. Hopefully, OFDM will be the Future.
  11. #151  
    Quote Originally Posted by 100thMonkey
    Quadband WCDMA? I know that globally, 2100 is the main frequency. Here AWS's markets are currently on 1900 and Cingular has issued an equipment request for WCMDA 850 that we may see a few years, but what is the fourth frequency that WCDMA will run on?
    The four GSM frequencies of 850/900/1800/1900 mhz.
  12. #152  
    Quote Originally Posted by 100thMonkey
    I'd love to get a Blue one, personally, even if it is preproduction
    me too...the blue looks good on the palm
    Naveen

    Current:Cingular 8525 w/Faria R32

    Next Phone:
    Something from HTC because Palm sucks, so I want a Touch Pro, Touch HD, or a Treo Pro.
  13. #153  
    Quote Originally Posted by Smartphone Fan
    The four GSM frequencies of 850/900/1800/1900 mhz.
    I hear you, something like a quadband GSM phone for WCDMA. I think that at this time, a world WCDMA handset would be triband with 850/1900/2100. Unless another country adds a new frequency. But actually, for now a dual band 1900/2100 WCDMA handset would allow to use it in all WCDMA networks, except NTT's FOMA since that is a bit older
    La Vie En Diaspora: Enfin, une émission qui raconte votre vie aux Etats-Unis

    Treo 600 in December '03, Treo 650 in February '05, HTC TyTN Pro in August '06, and back to Treo 750 in January '07, find me at MyTreo.net

    About me: story of the 100thMonkey
  14. #154  
    Quote Originally Posted by 100thMonkey
    I hear you, something like a quadband GSM phone for WCDMA. I think that at this time, a world WCDMA handset would be triband with 850/1900/2100. Unless another country adds a new frequency. But actually, for now a dual band 1900/2100 WCDMA handset would allow to use it in all WCDMA networks, except NTT's FOMA since that is a bit older
    You understand, but the problem I foresee is that there will not be universal adoption of WCDMA at the same time. The sets also need to support 850mhz, 900mhz, and 1800mhz for backward compatibility with GSM. You cannot assume GSM will go away soon.

    So that makes it a 5 band phone....
  15. #155  
    ouch! that's gonna drive up the cost of a handset for all that R&D to make a quinband dual mode handset work
    La Vie En Diaspora: Enfin, une émission qui raconte votre vie aux Etats-Unis

    Treo 600 in December '03, Treo 650 in February '05, HTC TyTN Pro in August '06, and back to Treo 750 in January '07, find me at MyTreo.net

    About me: story of the 100thMonkey
  16. #156  
    The following is the Quad-band description of the Treo 650 posted at ATTWS site:
    http://www.attwireless.com/midtolarg...lmone650.jhtml

    "...Quad-band GSM™/GPRS world phone—provides voice coverage in more than 130 GSM countries with features like 6-way conference calling*, speakerphone and voice-activated dialing. "

    I started thinking after reading the dialogue in the previous 8 post. 100's "Ooouch" in reference to the cost of a 5 band phone. Hmm. I started wondering exactly how much is quad-band technology costing PalmOne to manufacture. And do the abudance of Palm CDMA users/phones subsidize the cost of producing/manufacturing the technology of the more sophisticated GSM phones? Perhaps the CDMA phones are more costly to make and GSM users/phones subsidize them? Perhaps each technology pays it's own way?

    In my opinion, I think the GSM phones are more technically advanced than the CDMA phones. They are certainly lighter in weight. The GSM networks seem to be more feature rich. Wow! "6 way conference calling, etc."

    Thoughts?
  17. #157  
    Without any hard data to support the following supposition, I think the GSM and CDMA chipsets are probably very close in cost. Rationale: the relative inferiority of the CDMA chipset is counterbalanced by the "economies of scale" advantage of quad-band GSM chipsets.

    Someone please feel free to correct my very ignorant best guess.
    Off to iPhone land...
  18. #158  
    I'd be lying if I acted like I honestly knew, but I do know from HoFo that increasing the amount of frequencies that a single antena can transmit/receive at does increase the R&D cost
    La Vie En Diaspora: Enfin, une émission qui raconte votre vie aux Etats-Unis

    Treo 600 in December '03, Treo 650 in February '05, HTC TyTN Pro in August '06, and back to Treo 750 in January '07, find me at MyTreo.net

    About me: story of the 100thMonkey
  19. #159  
    i dont see gsm disappearing anytime soon. even though gsm is older than cdma, it is so much more widely used. a device that supports both cdma and gsm(4) would be awesome. one of the new motos(a840?) is both a gsm and cdma handset. i think gsm users will be happy when utms is fully rolled out
    Naveen

    Current:Cingular 8525 w/Faria R32

    Next Phone:
    Something from HTC because Palm sucks, so I want a Touch Pro, Touch HD, or a Treo Pro.
  20. #160  
    Gotta be careful, some of the those dual mode GSM/CDMA handsets that you see support GSM 900/1800 and CDMA2000 on 850/1900, thereby allows Verizon and Sprint subscribers to access GSm networks in other countries while still remaining on the native CDMA2k network domestically. Big difference there in WCDMA and CDMA2k. Gotta watch out for that my man
    La Vie En Diaspora: Enfin, une émission qui raconte votre vie aux Etats-Unis

    Treo 600 in December '03, Treo 650 in February '05, HTC TyTN Pro in August '06, and back to Treo 750 in January '07, find me at MyTreo.net

    About me: story of the 100thMonkey

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