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  1.    #1  
    I've never owned a palm device before. I'm heavily dependent on MS Outlook 2003. I use it for almost everything. I know that the activesync protocol has been licensed by Palm and that it will somehow allow direct connections to my Exchange 2003 server. What capabilities will I have? Will I have access to Contacts, Tasks, Calendar, Journal Items, Shared Calendars, Notes, Public Folders? Will some of these things only be updated when I do a "hotsync" with the cable? Will some of these things be unaccessible? If not are there some resonably priced 3rd party apps. I called Good awhile back and they're server package is way to expensive for this little 3 person office. I'm the only one in our office that needs this kind of access. Should I be looking at ppc? I have sprint so my choices are pretty limited.
  2. #2  
    At the Roadshow yesterday, P1 indicated that email and calendar and synced via the ActiveSync protocol. WHile it will wirelesslt sync, it is pull, not push.

    I used Good personally and love it. There are Good resellers out there. Might worth looking into -- is seems far more robust that the Exchange 2003 ActiveSync protocol
  3. #3  
    Quote Originally Posted by scsanden
    I'm heavily dependent on MS Outlook 2003. I use it for almost everything. I know that the activesync protocol has been licensed by Palm and that it will somehow allow direct connections to my Exchange 2003 server. What capabilities will I have? Will I have access to Contacts, Tasks, Calendar, Journal Items, Shared Calendars, Notes, Public Folders? Will some of these things only be updated when I do a "hotsync" with the cable? Will some of these things be unaccessible? If not are there some resonably priced 3rd party apps. I called Good awhile back and they're server package is way to expensive for this little 3 person office. I'm the only one in our office that needs this kind of access. Should I be looking at ppc? I have sprint so my choices are pretty limited.
    I do not believe there is an easy answer to your question. Here is what I have learned - Please do not take me to be an expert. Others on these boards know more.

    My understanding is that Exchange ActiveSync which will be the "out-of-the-box" solution for the 650 and is the packaged solution for PPC devices will sync your Calendar, Contacts & email but will not do tasks, journal, notes, shared calendars or public folder items.

    Also, the only difference between P1's implementation and PPC is that the PPC can be configured for essentially "push" in that the exchange server can send a message to the device to initiate an activesync.

    Look at Sproqit personal edition or a similar desktop redirector for more support for tasks and notes.

    Or accessing your exchange data via a vpn client using the mobile browser might be an option for the other data.

    The following is from Microsoft's white paper and discusses Exchange ActiveSync. There is more on Outlook Moble Access, but most people will probably not go that far and stick with the basic solution. MSFT Mobile Access

    Built-in server support for over-the-air synchronization with Exchange ActiveSync-enabled devices such as Windows Mobile 2002- and 2003-based devices (Microsoft Pocket PC and Smartphone devices). Synchronization can be on demand or scheduled, based on various settings from the device. This includes remote access to e-mail, calendar, and contacts, and coupled with Outlook Mobile Access, allows access to tasks and the Global Address List. Below is a comprehensive list of Exchange ActiveSync features:
    • Built-in support in Exchange Server works without requiring additional mobile synchronization servers or desktop redirectors.
    • Transfer of data over a secure connection directly between the mobile device and the server. Data is not stored on any intermediary servers in either the corporate or mobile operator networks.
    • Synchronization of e-mail, calendar, and contacts data between Exchange Server and mobile devices.
    • Optimization for efficient use of low-bandwidth high-latency networks.
    • Synchronization support for multiple e-mail folders.
    • Use of standard technologies such as HTTPS networking and XML data format.
    • Support for a variety of underlying network technologies, including GPRS, 1xRTT, and 802.11.
    • Wireless Binary XML (WBXML) support for compressed transmission of XML elements.
    • Support for device-initiated synchronization using a variety of methods: manual, scheduled, or in response to a notification from the server.
    • Server-side handling of all synchronization logic, including conflict resolution, which simplifies the client software.
    • Support for partial download of e-mail messages. The client determines how much of each item to receive initially and can subsequently ask for the entire item.
    • Support for download of e-mail attachments using a variety of options including automatic, on-demand, and manual. Automatic downloads can be based on file size or type.
    • Support for time limits on device-side storage of e-mail and calendar items to reduce memory usage. For example, only the last three days of e-mail and two weeks of calendar entries may be stored. Time-limit filtering is managed by the server, with no need for filtering on the client.
    • Support for forwarding and replying to e-mail directly from the server, without having to download and then upload the message.
    • Support for recovery from communications errors.
    • Synchronization of multiple mobile devices to the same server data.
    I hope this helps. Good luck.
  4. #4  
    I have a solution for Shared Calendars on Goodlink with Treo www.whoisbusy.com

    jcookATcookconsultingservices.com

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