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  1.    #1  
    I am a salesperson and travel from customer to customer. Many times after leaving a sales call I find myself wishing I could correspond with the customer with an afterthought or a piece of info I needed to research. The easiest way to do so is via an email, but I find that hard to do on the Treo with the tiny keyboard and me driving in my car. I have a voice recorder on my Treo that I use to keep my thoughts in order and my sales calls documented. I am wondering if there is an easy way to record an audio file and email it. The email program on my Treo only lets me attach pictures, ring tones, and documents. I am searching for a solution or a choice of solutions.
  2. #2  
    kinbells, try sendit it may solve your problem.
  3. #3  
    AudioMail will work very well in that application. Just record your file, link to your contact list and make a selection. The email address is pulled into the Audacity application. Then press the up navigation pad and the file is sent. The receiver just double clicks the file and it plays. Go to www.AudacityAudio.com, Products, Palm, Treo 600 Specific + AudioMail.
  4.    #4  
    Thanks for the tip. I tried them both.

    I first tried Sendit. The file got sent as "Filename.WAV.pdb. Windows media player would not play it so I deleted the .pdb. Windows media would still not play it. For some reason it was not recognized as a WAV file.

    I next tried Audacity Audio's Professional Edition along with AudioMail. I was somewhat skeptical after my first attempt, but after talking with Audacity Audio, I tried it. Audacity Audio helped me set it up. It worked quite well and is very easy to use. Two thirds of my files go to my assistant and the balance go to mainly sales contacts. I set the default to go to my assistant. I just record, hit the up navigation pad, and it goes. At the receiving end, just click on the attachment and it plays. If I want to send a note to a sales contact, I just tap a square to link to my contact list. I make a selection and the email address is pulled into the Audacity application. I record and send like before, but the new email address overrides my default setting. Very slick and very handy. I also noticed that the file transfer was much faster with Audacity. I'm not sure why that was as the record time was pretty equal in my testing.
  5. #5  
    Kinbells, you mention that the Audacity files transferred much faster. There is a reason. An audio file, in its native format, is generally very large. Audacity provides a choice of several record formats. A compressed format is recommended for AudioMail as the cellular network is very slow. The format Audacity recommends is less than a tenth as large as a standard PCM8 format. This enables the file to transfer much quicker. The file is decompressed at a midway point so the receiver can easily play it.

    Most record programs, at least the cheaper ones, do not provide compression at all. Some do, but watch out for different compression formats. There is a significant difference in file size and record quality. I know of one program that claims to support compressed files, but they use a zip process. First, zipping requires a post-record step and a pre-listen step. Second, while zipping a text file works well, it only saves about 20% on an audio file.

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