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  1.    #1  
    Dear all,

    I was just wondering...How much can you guys actually do with 1MB (GPRS) ? Is it a lot of memory for GPRS?

    Thanks.
  2. #2  
    Well I use my Treo with PDANet so i can surf the web from my Lappy, I also use Snapper Mail, Palm VPN, VeriChat, as well as surf the web with BLazer while downloading program... It adds up quickly...
    Iím a lucky man to count on both hands
    The ones I love..

    Visor Pro -> Visor Edge -> Treo 180 -> Treo 270 -> Treo 600 -> Treo 650 -> T|T2+SE T68i -> Treo 600 -> T-Mobile MDA -> Treo 755p -> Treo 800w -> Treo 755p -> PALM PRE -> Palm Pre 2 -> HP Palm Pre 3

    Twittering about
  3. #3  
    My primary daily use includes Snappermail and Blazer (browsing and prc/zip installs). My monthly data usage averages 50MB
  4. cec
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    #4  
    If you use Blazer (or other web browser) you will go through 1 MB in no time.
  5.    #5  
    Dear all,

    No wonder so many people are whining for WiFi.

    Will there be a day when GPRS charges come down, now that it is so expensive?
  6. #6  
    From the web:

    How Much Data Is That?

    Whenever we discuss quantities of data, we tend to do it in the abstract. We speak of a kilobyte, or a megabyte or a gigabyte without really knowing what it represents.

    The following table shows various quantities of bytes, in each power of ten. Usually, they are shown with multiples of 2 and 5 also. For example, 1 Kilobyte, 2 Kilobytes, 5 Kilobytes.

    All the examples are approximate and are rounded. For example, a computer card has 80 columns. If 50 columns contain data on a card, then two cards will be 100 bytes. Also, a 3-1/2 inch diskette can contain 1.4 Megabytes. Showing it as 1 Megabyte reflects both (a) the diskette not typically being filled and (b) rounding. Finally, a CD-ROM can hold more than 500 Megabytes. However, it is listed at that level as "typical" and as the closest match.

    Bytes (8 bits)
    0.1 bytes: A single yes/no decision (actually 0.125 bytes, but I rounded)
    1 byte: One character
    2 bytes:
    5 bytes
    10 bytes: One word
    20 bytes:
    50 bytes:
    100 bytes: Telegram; two punched computer (Hollerith) cards
    200 bytes:
    500 bytes:

    Kilobyte (1,000 bytes; 10 to the 3rd bytes)
    1 Kilobyte: Joke; (very) short story
    2 Kilobytes: Typewritten page
    10 Kilobytes: Page out of an encyclopedia
    20 Kilobytes:
    50 Kilobytes: Image of a document page, compressed (JPG)
    100 Kilobytes: Photograph, low-resolution
    200 Kilobytes: Two boxes (4000) punched computer (Hollerith) cards
    500 Kilobytes: Five boxes, one case (10,000 of punched computer (Hollerith) cards

    Megabyte (1,000,000 bytes; 10 to the 6th bytes)
    1 Megabyte: A novel (uncompressed); 3-1/2 inch diskette
    2 Megabytes: Photograph, high resolution (TIFF)
    5 Megabytes: Complete works of Shakespeare; 30 seconds of broadcast-quality video
    10 Megabytes: Minute of high-fidelity sound; digital chest X-ray; Box of 3-1/2 inch diskettes
    20 Megabytes: Two boxes of 3-1/2 inch diskettes
    50 Megabytes: Digital mammogram
    100 Megabytes: Yard of books on a shelf; two enclopedia volumes
    200 Megabytes: Reel of 9-track tape; IBM 3480 cartridge tape
    500-750 Megabytes: CD-ROM

    Gigabyte (1,000,000,000 bytes; 10 to the 9th bytes)
    1 Gigabyte: Paper in the bed of a pickup; symphony in high-fidelity sound; broadcast quality movie
    2 Gigabytes: 20 yards of books on a shelf
    5 Gigabytes: 8mm Exabyte tale
    10 Gigabytes:
    20 Gigabytes: Audio collection of the works of Beethoven; five Exabyte tapes; VHS tape used to store digital data
    50 Gigabytes: Library floor of books on shelves
    100 Gigabytes: Library floor of academic journals on shelves; large ID-1 digital tape
    200 Gigabytes: 50 Exabyte tapes

    Terabyte (1,000,000,000,000 bytes; 10 to the 12th bytes)
    1 Terabyte: Automated tape robot; all the X-ray films in a large technological hospital; 50,000 trees made into paper and printed; daily rate of EOS (Earth Orbiting System) data (1998)
    2 Terabytes: Academic research library
    10 Terabytes: Printed collection of the U. S. Library of Congress
    50 Terabytes: Large mass storage system

    Petabyte (1,000,000,000,000,000 bytes; 10 to the 15th bytes)
    1 Petabyte: 3 years of EOS data (2001)
    2 Petabytes: All U. S. academic research libraries
    20 Petabytes: 1995 production of hard-disk drives
    200 Petabytes: All printed material; 1995 total production of digital magnetic tape

    Exabyte (1,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes; 10 to the 18th bytes)
    5 Exabytes: All words ever spoken by human beings.

    Zettabyte (1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes; 10 to the 21st bytes)

    Yottabyte (1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes; 10 to the 24th bytes)


    Yeah, I know this is an overkill, but I think it makes a good reference point.



    fp
    <a href=http://www.floydpinkerton.net>My Homepage</a><br>
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  7. #7  
    aw, did ya have to use base 10?
    "The danger from computers is not that they will eventually get as smart as men, but that we will agree to meet them halfway." -Bernard Avishai
    "Computers are a lot like air conditioners - they both work great until you open windows." -Anonymous

  8. Aaron C's Avatar
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    #8  
    Floyd,
    Nice list but your a tiny bit wrong with your numbers:
    1 bit is the basis of all computer information and is a represntation of on or off (1 or 0)
    8 bits is 1 byte
    1024 bytes is 1kilobyte.
    The bit either a 1 or a 0, thus everything is in base 2. The kilo and mega and gig you are familiar with from the metric system is the same here, except applied to base 2 not base 10.
    1kilobyte (kb) = 1024 bytes
    1 meg = 1024 kb
    1gig = 1024 meg
    and so on.
    The confusion begins when one looks at marketing for computer items. Because base 2 is very confusing to the average person, marketing allows for the use of the more easily understood conversion you have listed.
    In fact on a lot of items such as hard drives and memery cards you will notice a very small disclaimer stating that all sizes are based on 1 gig = 1000 meg or something similar. You can easily see this sort of marketing with the SD cards used in your TREO. A 512meg SD card will format out to about 480meg. Some of this space is lost to formating and indexing of the card (it takes some space to organize the card) but most of the space you "lose" is due to the fact that somewhere on the box or in the documenation you will see that there 512meg card is in fact based on 1meg =1000kb.

    In any case, the lists you provide of real world items and there corrosponding size are very informative.
  9. Aaron C's Avatar
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    #9  
    After all that I forgot to answer the original question:
    A meg WAS an incomprehensibly large amount of data as short as 15 years ago. 10 years ago it was a moderate amount of data. 5 years ago it was small. Now it is an insignificant amount of data. Look at it this way. 15 years ago, 1 meg of ram would have cost around $100 for your average home pc. 10 years ago, the price of ram for your home pc averaged around $75. 5 years ago it averaged $5, today, a 512 megs of ram costs $100. Floppy disks (3.5 inch) used to cost $1 a disk, now you can routinely pick up 100s of floppies for a few dollars or get them free from large companies who like to recycle.
  10. #10  
    Yeah, I know. Like I said, I got that off the 'net a while ago. The idea is just to show approx how much data equals. Since you do know your bits and bytes, here's a trivia question for you:

    8 bits=1 byte, but do you know what 4 bits is called?

    Also, does anyone remember dot matrix printers? The part that you tore off (on the sides with the holes) has an official name, do you remember what it was?

    Damn I'm getting old.


    fp
    <a href=http://www.floydpinkerton.net>My Homepage</a><br>
    <a href=http://www.totaldialup.net>TotalDialup.com</a> My business<br>
    <a href=http://www.coverupsounds.com>Coverupsounds.com</a> (my small contribution)
  11. #11  
    As a further clarification:
    Typically, data rates are measured in bits, and large numbers are done with base-2. So when you talk about a 56kbps connection, you're talking about 56*1024 = 57344 bits per second.
    As mentioned, data-size figures (including storage) are typically measured in bytes, and large numbers are done in base-10.
    For comparison: this very webpage (at the time of my posting) was 84,481 bytes. That's about .08% of the 1 Megabyte you're talking about above. Do you look at more than 100 webpages in a month?
    Finally, to make this all even more confusing, remember that there's always stuff going on in the background (usually referred to as "overhead"). It might not be much, but that stuff is also eating away at your bandwidth.

    Nareau
  12. #12  
    4 bits is a nibble. . . blame it on my work with microcontrollers.

    The whole base 10 base two thing is a pain, really imo everything regcarding a computer should stay with base 2.
    "The danger from computers is not that they will eventually get as smart as men, but that we will agree to meet them halfway." -Bernard Avishai
    "Computers are a lot like air conditioners - they both work great until you open windows." -Anonymous

  13. #13  
    Quote Originally Posted by Tekara
    4 bits is a nibble. . . blame it on my work with microcontrollers.
    Unless we're talkin a BBC microcomputer (1 nibble = 3 bits). But you've got to think back to '82 to remember those beasties.
  14.    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by nareau
    As a further clarification:
    Typically, data rates are measured in bits, and large numbers are done with base-2. So when you talk about a 56kbps connection, you're talking about 56*1024 = 57344 bits per second.
    As mentioned, data-size figures (including storage) are typically measured in bytes, and large numbers are done in base-10.
    For comparison: this very webpage (at the time of my posting) was 84,481 bytes. That's about .08% of the 1 Megabyte you're talking about above. Do you look at more than 100 webpages in a month?
    Finally, to make this all even more confusing, remember that there's always stuff going on in the background (usually referred to as "overhead"). It might not be much, but that stuff is also eating away at your bandwidth.

    Nareau
    Dear all,

    Thanks Nareau (Is it .08 or 8%). Thanks everyone for that info. But does that mean I will be downloading 84,481 bytes via GPRS if I view this page on a treo 600? How did you find out this page is over 80k bytes?

    So I guess 1MB is just too small. (over here in Singapore, 1MB = S$5= US$2.85)
  15. #15  
    Actually, 1000 bytes = 1 kilobyte. 1024 bytes = 1 kibibyte.

    I've been fighting this for 15 years. Finally (over the last 5-10) an appropriate standard has been forged for base 2 increments.

    Obviously, 1 KILObyte = 1000 bytes, since kilo literally means 10^3.

    Take a look here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_prefix

    and use Google for more info if you want it. Most modern and rapid moving operating systems have made the switch in the last few years. For example:

    # ifconfig
    eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr xxxxxxxxxxx
    inet addr:xxxxxxxxxxx Bcast:255.255.255.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
    UP BROADCAST NOTRAILERS RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    RX packets:26267758 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    TX packets:30661396 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    RX bytes:748693837 (714.0 MiB) TX bytes:3971251573 (3.6 GiB)
    Interrupt:19 Base address:0x9800

    Note the GiB and MiB figures above...

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron C
    Floyd,
    Nice list but your a tiny bit wrong with your numbers:
    1 bit is the basis of all computer information and is a represntation of on or off (1 or 0)
    8 bits is 1 byte
    1024 bytes is 1kilobyte.
    The bit either a 1 or a 0, thus everything is in base 2. The kilo and mega and gig you are familiar with from the metric system is the same here, except applied to base 2 not base 10.
    1kilobyte (kb) = 1024 bytes
    1 meg = 1024 kb
    1gig = 1024 meg
    and so on.
    The confusion begins when one looks at marketing for computer items. Because base 2 is very confusing to the average person, marketing allows for the use of the more easily understood conversion you have listed.
    In fact on a lot of items such as hard drives and memery cards you will notice a very small disclaimer stating that all sizes are based on 1 gig = 1000 meg or something similar. You can easily see this sort of marketing with the SD cards used in your TREO. A 512meg SD card will format out to about 480meg. Some of this space is lost to formating and indexing of the card (it takes some space to organize the card) but most of the space you "lose" is due to the fact that somewhere on the box or in the documenation you will see that there 512meg card is in fact based on 1meg =1000kb.

    In any case, the lists you provide of real world items and there corrosponding size are very informative.
  16. #16  
    Quote Originally Posted by Lure_Angler
    Dear all,

    I was just wondering...How much can you guys actually do with 1MB (GPRS) ? Is it a lot of memory for GPRS?

    Thanks.


    1 MB is barely enough for 65 secs of p0r|\|
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by bbarnett
    Actually, 1000 bytes = 1 kilobyte. 1024 bytes = 1 kibibyte.

    I've been fighting this for 15 years. Finally (over the last 5-10) an appropriate standard has been forged for base 2 increments.

    Obviously, 1 KILObyte = 1000 bytes, since kilo literally means 10^3.

    Take a look here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_prefix

    and use Google for more info if you want it. Most modern and rapid moving operating systems have made the switch in the last few years. For example:

    # ifconfig
    eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr xxxxxxxxxxx
    inet addr:xxxxxxxxxxx Bcast:255.255.255.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
    UP BROADCAST NOTRAILERS RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
    RX packets:26267758 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
    TX packets:30661396 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
    collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
    RX bytes:748693837 (714.0 MiB) TX bytes:3971251573 (3.6 GiB)
    Interrupt:19 Base address:0x9800

    Note the GiB and MiB figures above...

    Ok, ok...so how many ounces in a cup?
  18.    #18  
    What the...

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