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  1.    #1  
    http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759...04dtx1k0000599

    Worth a read. Discusses Cobalt OS struggle (PalmOne vs. PalmSource). Also says next month on Treo 650.
  2. Iceman6's Avatar
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    #2  
    Wow! Thanks for the link. So there will be maybe a dozen NEW Palm-based smartphones between now and mid-2005. And some of them will be Cobalt phones! This throws a whole new monkey wrench in my upgrade plans.
  3. #3  
    I would be mostly interrested by the RIM email client!
  4. #4  
    Quote Originally Posted by MobileDave
    http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759...04dtx1k0000599

    Worth a read. Discusses Cobalt OS struggle (PalmOne vs. PalmSource). Also says next month on Treo 650.
    Show's how out of touch P1 is...
  5. #5  
    I think there are some factual errors in this article. Treo 650 has been on the drawing board for a while, while the Cobalt 6.1 is just now coming out. So the statement of P1 "rejecting Cobalt for its eagerly awaited Treo 650" doesn't make any sense at all.
  6. #6  
    Here is the infoworld notice
    Tony A

    PalmSource unveils Cobalt 6.1 OS
    OS now supports open source Eclipse environment



    By Ephraim Schwartz September 27, 2004



    PalmSource will ratchet up the competition among wireless OS vendors this week by announcing Cobalt 6.1, the latest version of its mobile operating system. The main emphasis of the new PalmSource OS is on wireless connectivity, putting it on a par with Microsoft’s (Profile, Products, Articles) Windows Mobile and Nokia’s (Profile, Products, Articles) Symbian mobile OSes.


    Cobalt 6.1 will now support both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, whereas licensees previously had to integrate support. The integration of telephony features also has been enhanced with improved call management. Users will be able to temporarily interrupt a data synchronization session to answer a voice call and return to synchronization when the call is complete without restarting the sync session.

    For handset licensees, support is built in for one-handed screen navigation. The new OS also supports multiple connections, giving users the ability to browse the Web while using a Bluetooth headset.

    John Cook, product marketing manager at PalmSource, said the latest version of the OS gives handset makers what they want. “They say, ‘Bring us a finished phone, and we will be glad to carry it,’ ” he said.

    PalmSource also appears to be serving developer interests. Tony Meadow, president of Bear River Associates, a mobile application developer, said he is pleased with the new PalmSource browser. He also said PalmSource’s support for a plethora of different resolution sizes will allow hardware manufacturers to create a variety of products. “They could make a real interesting electronic book, for example,” he said.

    Although Meadow said that in some ways PalmSource has caught Cobalt 6.1 up to Windows Mobile and in other ways has made it more advanced, he also said the company still faces a challenge in appealing to corporate developers.

    The new support for Java using the open source Eclipse development environment is a good step, but in a large enterprise, PalmSource needs to support multiple development tools, Meadow said.

    Analyst Gerry Purdy, president of MobileTrax, said the enhanced support for multitasking and multithreading puts PalmSource on par with Windows Mobile and that Symbian still has a way to go in terms of wireless data support. Symbian currently supports Bluetooth and will add support for Wi-Fi later this year. Windows Mobile supports both standards.

    But as the OS vendors leapfrog each other with the latest features and functions, will they get consumers and business users to switch?

    A wireless middleware vendor, iAnywhere Solutions (Profile, Products, Articles), polled more than 3,200 of its customers who use PDAs and found usage divided at 50 percent for Palm devices, 40 percent for Windows Mobile devices, and 10 percent for other operating systems. A full 85 percent planned to stay with the same OS with their next purchase
  7. #7  
    I just looked at what look like authentic pics of the Treo 650 on this URL:
    http://www.engadget.com/entry/2746522431029510/

    There is a weird inconsistance going on here.
    The photos show a removable cover on the back, which indicates battery replacement, which indicates NAND memory support, which indicates that the OS is 6.1 Cobalt ! Seems too good to be true, but this is what I understand from the PalmDev conference in Munich last week.
    As far as I know, Garnet can't do NAND. Any other developers out there with an idea?

    Rob.
  8. #8  
    Sorry, but I can't seem to get to the article. Can you paste another link or direct this incompetent soul to the right place. Thanks!
  9. Iceman6's Avatar
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    #9  
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob010101
    I just looked at what look like authentic pics of the Treo 650 on this URL:
    http://www.engadget.com/entry/2746522431029510/

    There is a weird inconsistance going on here.
    The photos show a removable cover on the back, which indicates battery replacement, which indicates NAND memory support, which indicates that the OS is 6.1 Cobalt ! Seems too good to be true
    Rob.
    Yes, Treo 650 has a removable battery. No, it's not a Cobalt phone. We all wish it were!
    P.S. those pictures were originally posted on this website. Where ya been???
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman6
    Yes, Treo 650 has a removable battery. No, it's not a Cobalt phone. We all wish it were!
    P.S. those pictures were originally posted on this website. Where ya been???
    Not only that, but have been superceded by even newer ones on teh Sprint specific model with separate color numeric pad.
    Remember, the "P" in PDA stands for personal.
    If it works for you, it is "P"erfect.

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