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  1.    #1  
    Just started a job where they lock all the PCs so you don't get local admin rights so I can't install Palm to play with some freeware Palm apps (

    Theres no work to do today since the server I'm working on is down due to an expired license ) hence I'm extremely bored and the mind wanders.....

    I'm sure others have had this problem and I was thinking how one might get around it...

    I figured using PilotInstall would be a good start as its a standalone .exe so I can run that fine. Trouble is I need the USB driver to be installed...

    Since I can't do that the usual way through XP, I figured copying USBPORT.DLL into the PilotInstall directoy might work - of course I can't get hold of that file because I can't instll the palm software!

    Any chance someone could send me the file?

    ...or offer an alternative way to get files into my palm from a PC with USB but no way to install the usual USB driver...? (no IRDA port unfortunately)

    Tried USBTest but that doesn't get past the first "Please Wait" step...
  2. #2  
    Put the Palm install program on your desktop and rename it to calc.exe and then try that.

    It works for me when I want to get around the corporate 'Admin rights' thing.

    Good luck
    www.gsmworld.com
  3.    #3  
    No such luck I'm afraid (I assume you meant rename the installer for Palm Desktop... rather than pilot install).

    The installer kicks me out with a "Come back when you have admin rights" type message!

    Any other ideas anyone? The usbport.dll trick (as per the help in Pilot Install) does not seem to be working either...

    cheers,

    Dan.
  4. z3bum's Avatar
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    #4  
    Palm Hotsync won't run at all without local administrator rights. It's been that way since Windows Nt days. But help is possible. I found a site on internet that let's you download a Linux Boot disk image to a cd or floppy, that cracks the Windows Passwords! It's very cool, fast, free and it works. The only problem is that it resets the administrator password to whatever you like, and you can't restore it. Basically, you set the local administrator password, login as administrator, and add your domain user as a local administrator. Then, reboot the pc, and login as yourself on the company domain. Now you will be able to install whatever you like. There might be corporate ramifications to giving yourself rights on your desktop, so you should read your company's computer policy very carefully. I will dig around on internet and post the site here.
    Palm III -> Palm V -> Blue Palm Vx w/Omnisky -> Treo 270 -> Treo 600 -> Treo 650 -> Treo 680
  5. z3bum's Avatar
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    #5  
    go to this site and download the disk image! It works very well.

    http://home.eunet.no/~pnordahl/ntpasswd/
    Palm III -> Palm V -> Blue Palm Vx w/Omnisky -> Treo 270 -> Treo 600 -> Treo 650 -> Treo 680
  6. #6  
    Email the file from the PC to an email account that you can access from the Palm. Then detach and install the file via the email client.
  7.    #7  
    Hmm... yeah, I don't think attempting to crack the admin password is an option - I don't intend to do anything too underhand - just access the palmtop with the access rights I do have - a standalone executable (I can run these) should have worked and the help in PilotInstall suggests you can do this using usbport.dll and/or the 'USB Test' application.

    Maybe theres a project in this for someone?


    As for email, in the UK we have to pay for data by the kilobyte and its expensive so most people don't use their smartphones for mobile internet access (and hence, like me, don't even bother to set up their mobile email...). I've always tended to save sites at work using JPluckX (a Plucker replacement app in JAVA) to read on the train home (theregister, slashdot, BBC news etc).

    I think my only remaining option will be to use the USB mass storage driver for the Treo (the one that turns the phone into a SD/MMC card reader as far as Windows is concerned). Since the driver for Universal Mass Storage comes with Win XP, I don't think I'll have a problem transferring files - only trouble is, will I be able to get these into the phone's memory from the SD card?

    Dan.
  8. #8  
    If you copy .prc files into the /PALM/Launcher directory on the SD, you will be able to "copy" them to the T600's ROM from the application launcher "App" menu.

    You can also use a program like "FileZ" to move files from anywhere on the SD to the T600 ROM.
  9. #9  
    I have been looking for a solution to this as well.
    I have admin rights on my PC at work but am restricted by policy NOT to install any software. They scan PCs for installed software so anything I installed would be detected at some point.

    I know this is not a suitable workaround for most people since they are not able to do initial installations but here is what I did on my work PC.

    I used a portable USB device to launch the setup application for hotsyn and I used that device as the destination for the installation so the software is not installed to the corporate PC. This is not perfect since registry entries are created and program groups are added but the application itself resides on my USB device. I then removed the program group and edited the registry to remove the application from the installed software menu so it would not show up in SMS scans (I think this will keep it from being detected).
    Now when I want to run the software I plug in the portable USB memory device, execute the sync software from there and then press the sync button on my sync cable.

    I tried using the usb installed software on a PC where the installation was not originally run and it failed. My assumption is that without the registry entries the software does not know where to look for it's own files. With a bit of effort reviewing the registry entries a workaround might be found for placing any needed dll files into the execute folder for the software but this may or may not work depending on how the software works locating it's own files.

    I would be happy to know if anyone else has been able to accomplish running the sync software on a locked down PC and how they have accomplished it.

    The funny thing in my company is that Palm devices are supported (though they are pushing everyone towards Blackberry) but only if it is a company purchased device. If you bought your own, they will not allow you to install the software to make use of it.
  10. #10  
    Quote Originally Posted by z3bum
    Palm Hotsync won't run at all without local administrator rights. It's been that way since Windows Nt days.
    You absolutely need admin rights to install Palm Hotsync- no way around that one at all It's not so much the ability to run .exe files (you most likely have no problem doing that) but the installation requires the application to write to the registry, which you'd need admin rights for. Once it's installed, you no longer need admin rights to hotsync, but an admin must set it up.

    I have a Palm Vx through work (one of the very lucky very few due mainly to a convenient beaurocratic slip-up!) but they won't let me install the USB drivers for my Treo. And policy prohibits use of personal PDAs, which frustrates a good many of us who would just like to be able to sync up. So, I sit, having to hotsync at home and do a protracted manual beaming to get info back and forth, and I guess I should be happy I can at least do that much. *sigh*
  11. #11  
    I help administor a corporate network and have to listen to alot of people who are unhappy with IT policies that prohibit them from installing this or that onto their computers. Companies do not provide computers, and pay an IT staff, for their employee's so that they can play with their new Treo's. My workload would triple if I had to support everyones favorite app every other day.

    I know it sucks not being able to sync your treo at work, but there are valid reasons why you shouldn't be able to. Granted, there are people out there (especually Treo 600 fanatics like us) that are capable enough to be able to manage their own pc's without the help from their IT department, but most people are not that savvy.
    Browse over to my new forum. http://www.palmfanatic.com

    "The wireless telegraph is not difficult to understand. The ordinary telegraph is like a very long cat. You pull the tail in New York, and it meows in Los Angeles. The wireless is the same, only without the cat. " - Albert Einstein

    Palm IIIxe - Kyocera 7135 - Treo 600 - Treo 650 -> Palm Vx - Tungsten T3 - Treo 700p
  12. randyg's Avatar
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    #12  
    Have you even considered asking the IT person to install it for you? I am the IT geek at my office and we do it all the time...depending on the app of course. We also provide some users with PDA's so it's essential to have it on some machines. If they will not do it then it is best left alone, as you can probably be fired for putting non-approved sw on your machine...at least that's what we do.
    a dirty mind is a terrible thing to waste
  13. #13  
    As an IT guy -- Don't install your crap on our company computers. Use them for work and play with your Treos at home!
  14. randyg's Avatar
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    #14  
    Quote Originally Posted by Joebar99
    As an IT guy -- Don't install your crap on our company computers. Use them for work and play with your Treos at home!
    Yeah, we used to have IT guys like this at work...we fired them.

    I'm telling you, your IT guy can be a big asset to you if you try being nice to them! Unless their just obnoxious turds that think they know everything.
    a dirty mind is a terrible thing to waste
  15. #15  
    Yeah...really "outside the box thinking"...have you thought of going to IT and saying...I would really like to use a palm to stay more organized and on top of things...would you mind installing this for me?
  16. #16  
    Why mess with HotSync at all if all you want to is install PRC's? Download the file, copy it to your SD card via a $15 card reader, then install it by opening it with Blazer.

    From Blazer, open the file with the URL: file:///filename.prc.

    On second thought, it might be easier just to go to work for a company without such a draconian IT policy.

    tdh
  17. #17  
    Quote Originally Posted by tdhood
    Why mess with HotSync at all if all you want to is install PRC's? Download the file, copy it to your SD card via a $15 card reader, then install it by opening it with Blazer.

    From Blazer, open the file with the URL: file:///filename.prc.

    On second thought, it might be easier just to go to work for a company without such a draconian IT policy.

    tdh
    Whoa, calling these IT policies draconian is a bit of a stretch, I think.

    As mentioned in earlier posts, these computers are owned by a corporation, not an individual, after all. The IT staff are being paid to maintain the integrity and stability of the corporate computing network. When you have a large number of users, there are more bad apples who, with administrative privileges, can really put a drain on the IT staff's workload. I'm actually a sysadmin turned manager, so I do have some experience with people who complain that their computers don't work and when we take a look there is all sorts of non-work stuff on them that we are expected to fix. No thought is given about the rest of the real work we have to do! Having the ability to lock down PCs in this way has been a godsend and way overdue in the Windows world, IMHO.

    Anyway, I agree with others that the best approach would be to ask your IT staff. In some cases, they may even give you temporary administrative privileges which can be reset after the install and a reboot.

    Regards,
    Mike
    Last edited by work2fish; 09/02/2004 at 10:41 PM.
  18.    #18  
    In the end I've installed the trial version of Softick Cardexport II (I finally set up my GPRS email on Orange and emailed the PRC). This is fine for what I want to do...

    I agree that asking IT is usually the best thing, and they're a nice bunch here, but I get the impression it'll be too much hassle due to the red tape they have to adhere to - will probably have to fill in several forms and wait 6 months... Besides, I get the impression they have a massive workload so I don't want to bother them with 'just for fun' stuff...

    Since I just want to try out various progs in my lunch hour or install something to play with on the long commute home )

    I'm reading a damn good book at the moment (OT: The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown - 'bestseller' thriller type thing - highly recommended!), but I'll probably get around to installing JpluckX (should be OK since its JAVA) and transfer PDBs via Cardexport and Universal Mass Storage once I've finished that and train journeys are boring again )

    Since
  19. #19  
    Our IT guys are idiots.
    I work for a large company who has decided the best approach to business is to fire anyone who has been here a long time and has worked themselves into higher salaries. They then replace a small percentage of the vacant positions with young kids just out of school for about 40% of the pay.
    As a result we have inexperienced and generally not too bright IT people trying to fill the role formerly supported by a larger number of very experienced people.
    To make the situation worse the IT folks pushed for a received absolute control of IT support from areas originally dedicated to the IT support of specific divisions and departments. Each area is a highly specialized business or support area with highly individualized needs that the overworked and underexperienced IT folks cannot begin to understand. As a result these IT guys have to come to me to fix their problems for them quite frequently. I do not have the ability to log into and repair a machine or do the software installs (except on my own PC) so they have me come over, they log into the PC, I fix the problem for them and then they go away and write one more problem solved.

    Our IT department has become such a victim of corporate politics and cost cutting that they retaliated by drawing in as much power and control as they could get in order to preserve what jobs they have left and secure their position. Both corporate policies and IT's response hurt the clients in the long run but it will be a few years yet before things swing the other way again and the business becomes more service focused.

    As with many large companies the policies are inflexible. There is no room for debate or even for the local IT guy to "Do you a favor" here. Palm based devices ARE supported within the company but only when purchased BY the company. One would think that if the only point of contention is the software and that same software is allowed and supported on some company machines then it is not an exceptional thing to allow it on others. After all the reason for limiting hardware and software is to reduce the amount of support related issues based on unknown hardware and software. Once a software is proven to be safe in a given environment and the company has even SMS packaged it for automatic rollout then the issue of whether the already approved hardware model being privately or company owned is not truly a support issue and giving that client the software is not an issue either.
    Our IT guys do not support the hardware at all. If it breaks you go buy a new one. Their sole excuse for holding back the software at this point is that it is against company policy.

    Quote Originally Posted by randyg
    Yeah, we used to have IT guys like this at work...we fired them.

    I'm telling you, your IT guy can be a big asset to you if you try being nice to them! Unless their just obnoxious turds that think they know everything.
  20. #20  
    Mike, I agree with you despite what impression my previous rant may have given everyone.

    I worked our HelpDesk for 4 years and desktop support for several more.
    The average user just should NOT have the ability to install software. It is impossible to stay legal with licensing and the desktops are a hundred times less stable. Locking down desktops greatly reduces the number of support calls by eliminating many of the causes of software conflicts and infections.

    My complaint is simply that the policies are created a little too broadly with little consideration to how that policy impacts some areas of the company.
    Policy is treated as black & white with no gray area here. There is no room for rational thought or even discussion becasue the IT department is afraid of losing ANY control. Hey, it's understandable. Those guys are trying desperately to hang onto their jobs. But it hurts the company in the long run.

    The guy down the hall can have a company purchased Treo and all the software that comes with it. If I purchase my own I cannot have the software on my work PC because it is against company policy. The company benefits from me having the Treo and from me being able to sync up to my work PC. They do not have to install or support the software or the phone but they disallow me from installing it myself. In truth they would look the other way if I install the software myself except to hold it against me if they decided they wanted to cut budgets and to fire me rather than lay me off would save them on the percentages they have to pay out to the state for unemployment benefits.

    Quote Originally Posted by work2fish
    Whoa, calling these IT policies draconian is a bit of a stretch, I think.

    As mentioned in earlier posts, these computers are owned by a corporation, not an individual, after all. The IT staff are being paid to maintain the integrity and stability of the corporate computing network. When you have a large number of users, there are more bad apples who, with administrative privileges, can really put a drain on the IT staff's workload. I'm actually a sysadmin turned manager, so I do have some experience with people who complain that their computers don't work and when we take a look there is all sorts of non-work stuff on them that we are expected to fix. No thought is given about the rest of the real work we have to do! Having the ability to lock down PCs in this way has been a godsend and way overdue in the Windows world, IMHO.

    Anyway, I agree with others that the best approach would be to ask your IT staff. In some cases, they may even give you temporary administrative privileges which can be reset after the install and a reboot.

    Regards,
    Mike
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