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  1. #21  
    Quote Originally Posted by the_nite_owl
    ...The company benefits from me having the Treo and from me being able to sync up to my work PC. They do not have to install or support the software or the phone but they disallow me from installing it myself. In truth they would look the other way if I install the software myself except to hold it against me if they decided they wanted to cut budgets and to fire me rather than lay me off would save them on the percentages they have to pay out to the state for unemployment benefits.
    How are companies supposted to differentiate between people like you who are able to manage your own pc and keep IT away, and people who need IT to help install and troubleshoot personal software? They can't. Companies should not have to be tasked to differentiate. Giving them that task costs money. So saying that your company will save money if they let you install your own software just doesn't make sence.
    Browse over to my new forum. http://www.palmfanatic.com

    "The wireless telegraph is not difficult to understand. The ordinary telegraph is like a very long cat. You pull the tail in New York, and it meows in Los Angeles. The wireless is the same, only without the cat. " - Albert Einstein

    Palm IIIxe - Kyocera 7135 - Treo 600 - Treo 650 -> Palm Vx - Tungsten T3 - Treo 700p
  2. #22  
    Quote Originally Posted by work2fish
    Whoa, calling these IT policies draconian is a bit of a stretch, I think.
    I don't think it's a stretch at all. Somewhere along the line, corporate IT forgot that it's a SERVICE organization and that the corporate user community are its CUSTOMERS. IT does (should) not set corporate policy on matters like these. Advise, yes - enforce, yes - set, no.

    Am I saying that all bets are off, that Joe User can install whatever garbage he wants on the company's computer? Absolutely not - chaos would ensue. What I'm arguing is that corporate policy should be smart enough to make allowance for the employees who - on their own initiative & nickel - procure the tools to make themselves more efficient.

    In my company ($3 billion annually, 17K employees), the policy officially states that the company will not buy PDA's for employees, except with the expressed approval of a division president. Further, employees are not allowed to log on with local administrative credentials. However, policy also states that local PC techs are allowed to do the installs for the user. This keeps the company's property (reasonably) secure, but doesn't hinder those employees who go for PDA's.

    tdh
  3. #23  
    Companies can NOT differentiate between skill sets of clients because their own skill sets vary so much. But company policy should be flexible enough to consider exceptions rather than taking a hard black and white approach to everything. The company saves money because they did not buy or maintain the tool I have purchased. They would not LOSE money by installing on my PC the same software that they already install on other PCs in the company. The software itself is not banned, it has been tested and approved for use but the policy dictates they will only support the PDA they have purchased.
    The company loses out on the increased efficiency I can provide using the tools I purchased on my own simply because they will not allow the installation of software they have already approved the use of.
    The software is already SMS packaged. To roll it out to my desktop is just a matter of listing me to receive it on the server for a push installation.
    There was no concious decision about restricting the software from some users and not others it is just a result of a policy that first the company has to purchase the hardware before the software is allowed to be installed and the system is so inflexible that it cannot accomodate a software install for a non-company purchased device that still falls within it's hardware/software standards.

    Quote Originally Posted by BLUES
    How are companies supposted to differentiate between people like you who are able to manage your own pc and keep IT away, and people who need IT to help install and troubleshoot personal software? They can't. Companies should not have to be tasked to differentiate. Giving them that task costs money. So saying that your company will save money if they let you install your own software just doesn't make sence.
  4. skidoo's Avatar
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    #24  
    Can anyone say, "Napolean Complex?" :-) Farkin' IT dinks. Just do the Linux disk image thing and then claim ignorance later. End of discussion.
  5. #25  
    Things have become more relaxed for us but it is at a serious risk of backdooring something into our corporate LAN. Whilst we may not be directly effected, the machines we sync with will be, I know that I am less conscious of what I'm opening in a works enviroment. Most users aren't interested enough to maintain a safe enviroment and that's why I.T policies exist.

    You don't think for a second they are worried about making your one machine slightly unstable through installing an easily verified stable app? But opening up local privileges
    to people who have no interest in how a computer works is a disaster, an even bigger disaster is opening a computer to someone who IS interested in how they work.

    A firm believer in flexibility and discretion however, a more tangible way of doing this is a user ranking system. Calls for application faults marked down, a security breach is immediate removal of privileges.
  6. #26  
    I've the same problem that py9drs. In fact, I've got right now installed all the software for the Treo 600 but the company is migrating to Windows XP and in a couple of months the IT Department has indicated me that they will not install the Palm applications.

    My corporate PC is a portable, a Toshiba Satellite Pro 6100. I've no idea about hacking or things like that, I'm just another happy Palm user that does not want to lose all the capabilities that for my work my Treo offers me. I explain that because perhaps some of my ideas are too naive or even stupid but ...:

    - Is it not possible to use another computer (my homecomputer, with no adm. problems), to install the Treo applications -and Documents to go, etc.-, to copy all of that to a CD (once installed, I mean), to put the CD into my corporate computer and to copy in the HD the applications, as any other file?. I tried to do that with a little game (Strategic Command, as a matter of fact), and it works, why not with the Palm programs (all the necessary software can be copied to a CD, it is enough space on it).

    - It is not possible to buy a external plug-and-play HD, to connect it to my homecomputer, to install in the HD the Palm applications, to connect afterwards the external HD in the USB port and to use it?. I do not know if, not having adm. rights, my corporate portable will not recognize the external HD, but ... it's just another idea.

    - It is not possible to start the corporate computer with a CD with a Windows system, and, once the computer is working, to connect another external CD and to install the Palm applications?.

    Thanks in advance for your input!. I think I have no possibilities of having comprehension of my IT people, so, any system to install the software would be fantastic.
  7. #27  
    Sorry but I am pretty certain that won't work.
  8. Loolaw's Avatar
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    #28  
    I completely understand the lock down policy.. some programs often mess with company builds and the expense of troubleshooting an office full of PCs with unknown, untested software is simply too costly. Especially when you're talking about very large, global corporations

    However, what I cannot understand is any company which does not have Palm management software as an approved application. My company has a very hard line lock down policy.. can't even save files to the C drive. Palm & Intellisync comes with the standard build.
  9. #29  
    Quote Originally Posted by Busoni
    I've the same problem that py9drs. In fact, I've got right now installed all the software for the Treo 600 but the company is migrating to Windows XP and in a couple of months the IT Department has indicated me that they will not install the Palm applications. ...
    That won't work, sorry. Most software requires dll installations and many many additions to the registry Palm's software is one of these, I can tell you that for certain! About the only think you CAN do is change the checkbox from USB to Serial and back once it's installed and switch between users (not add users, mind you, just switch between them), but that doesn't really help you in your situation. You can just disk over Elf Bowling though, that doesn't make registry calls!

    About the only recourse you have left is to install the software on your home computer and email the files back and forth to sync. It's a PITA, but the only way to get around most IT network lockdowns. It's what I have to do. Our network has a policy that only official government-issue devices can connect to the LAN- my old PalmVx is OK, but my new Treo is not, ARGH!! With the OS3/OS5 differences, the only things compatible between the two are contacts and memos which I've been adding to (or deleting to) temp categories so that I can periodically send the changes to the other devices and thus manually "sync" the two. WordToGo, AutoCAD and other files all have to be emailed back and forth and hotsynced at home because my PalmVx won't support them.

    Now since you have access to your own laptop... there ARE ways to hack the admin password (surprisingly easy ways, actually), at which point you could violate your company's IT policy and do whatever you want But they don't usually take kindly to that. Can you get an SD reader on your work PC? That might help alleviate a lot of the issues...
    Last edited by SteveFehr; 09/25/2004 at 12:31 PM.
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